Heart of a Southern Woman

A snapshot of life one blog post at a time.

Honoring the College and University Level Teachers in Our Family, Past and Present

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Teachers teach all other professions

During the months of September and October, 2015, we’ve been honoring and recognizing the Educators in our Family Tree, past and present. I am presenting quite a few educators in today’s blog post. I am sure that there are many more whom I either have not identified, or did not know. Please feel free to comment and tell me about those I have missed so that I can either include them here with a correction or write an addendum.

It just so happens that I had the blessing in my life to teach children with behavioral and emotional issues in first  through sixth grade right out of college. After being at that level for three years, I moved to the Junior High level where I taught students aged 12-16, they would be classified middle and high schoolers today.  When we first moved to Raleigh, North Carolina in 1980, I had the opportunity to teach Interpersonal Communication at North Carolina State University for 3 years as a “Visiting Lecturer”. Most of you know, with my BA from Greensboro College and my MA in Clinical Psychology from Chapman College,  I went on to become an individual and family therapist for twenty years after that.  My point is to say, having taught at the different levels, and known so many teachers over the years, I can say that teaching is challenging at all levels! The challenges are different for sure, but the ultimate goal  is to educate, and every single level is needed to create success at the next level! We cannot skip any level of development and learning and expect to have a well-educated person! As the saying above aptly states, “Teaching is the profession that teaches all other professions!”  Nothing could be more true! Why then don’t we make the salary of our CEO’s!  I’d vote for that!  It’s past time the importance and value of our teachers be more highly recognized by our States and National Government budget makers!

We have amazing people in our family–I hope you will enjoy “meeting” these people  and knowing just a bit about what they do and where they teach, if you want to be in touch with any of them, let me know and I will ask them to get in touch. I am presenting them in alphabetical order by first name, we are family after all!

Carol E. Winters, 2013Carol E. Winters, PhD, RN, CNE (Doctorate, Registered Nurse, Certified Nursing Educator) my cousin through the Scottish Hogue family, is currently a Professor of Nursing at East Carolina University in Greenville, NC.  She is the Director of the MSN Nursing Education Concentration–she teaches Graduate level nurses to be Nursing Educators! Carol served as the Dean of the School of Nursing at Hawaii Pacific University in Hawaii for 16 years before returning home to North Carolina.  Carol has a BA in Christian Education from Greensboro College in Greensboro, NC, then an M.S. in Nursing at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. She earned her PhD at the University of Pittsburgh in Pennsylvania.  Not only has she these teaching , leadership accomplishments, but so much more! She is a published author, has been a hands-on nurse of obstetrics, and since 2009, has been a Faculty Advisor for the NFLA, Nurse Faculty Leadership Academy, a national organization sponsored by Sigma Theta Tau, the International Nursing Honor Society jointly with the Elsevier Foundation. There is so much more I could tell you about this dynamic woman who happened to be my college roommate and friend of almost 50 years! We only discovered our cousinship last year through my genealogical research!  She has three children, five grandchildren, and has done vast amounts of volunteer work in her communities, and served and led many committees.

 October 1, 2015,–Carol Emerson Winters was honored as the 2015 Nurse Educator of the Year by the NCNA, the North Carolina Nursing Association! CONGRATULATIONS! AN HONOR WELL DESERVED! congratulations in gold

My Hogue cousin, Dee Horn, has tutored College level     Dee Horn also   English at two  different colleges over the years. I have known many college level tutors. When I was at NC State University I quickly learned how invaluable they were to many students–like those who had learning disabilities, some who were blind, and  even some who were valuable sports team members who needed extra help to keep up with academics during their physically demanding playing and practice seasons. We take our hats off to one on one teachers! 

Donna Miller 3Another Hogue cousin  Donna Miller earned her degree from Indiana University of Pennsylvania and taught Business Education  at the High School level, in Business Schools, and at Community Colleges.  Life, marriage, and children took her from Pennsylvania to Connecticut and Rhode Island.  In Norwich, Connecticut, for 23 years, she taught at a business school and served as an Academic Dean!  After retirement, she worked  part-time at Three Rivers Community College.  

When I asked Donna about some memories, she  said several things which I wanted to share.  One was a simple teaching technique but fun: “I liked making the students think about what they were doing. Sometimes I would purposely make a spelling or grammatical error on a test and then tell the students that they would get extra points if they found it.” That’s the kind of thing that adds an extra challenge and a bit of fun for students!   She went on to say: “It’s the one profession where students have actually come back and said, ‘Thank you for believing in me,’ or ‘pushing me,’ or ‘making me realize that I can do . . . .’  When you are finished teaching, you know that despite some of the negatives (there were stressors), you feel that you have done something positive with your life.”  Oh yes! I know a lot of the educators we have profiled feel this way, and it is why we admire and love them so!  When a teacher’s philosophies so resonate with you, you know you’d love to have that teacher for yourself, or for your children, and you know with certainty that they are a GREAT teacher! 

My first cousin James Goodell, great-great grandson of Goodell, James McClainJ.Steptoe Langhorne, has taught computer sciences for many years at Menlo College in Atherton, California. He studied at the University of Freiburg located in Freiburg im Breisgau, Baden-Württemberg, Germany.  He currently serves as President of the Goodell Corporation, a family real estate school and business his father founded.

Youngblood, LarryLarry Youngblood is one of our multi-leveled/multi-talented teachers as well! For years he has home schooled his grandchildren through all the levels of education!  Having studied at Texas A&M University Larry  has taught at Private Catholic Schools, Business Schools and Universities.  For several years now, Larry has been the Administrator of the International Youngblood DNA Project researching the  different family lines of Youngbloods evidenced by their dna.  He is currently writing a book about the Youngblood/Jungblut/Jungbloedt families. Thank you Larry! 

Pat Spangler, PhD, my second cousin, son of Charles Langhorne Spangler and Kittie Cockram Spangler, grandson of  Fanny Langhorne, and Great Grandson Spangler, Pat, PhD 2014of J.Steptoe Langhorne is a geophysicist in a family with three close cousins who are/were geophysicists! What honor he and they bring to our family!  You can read a previous blog post featuring them  at  Buck, Spangler and Houchins, Three Cousins Who are Geophysicists as Well!   Pat Spangler, PhD, is retired from the University of Florida, and thus his title is now Associate Professor Emeritus of Geology. Pat has published extensively and is highly respected in the academic community as well as in his family community.

Rick White, PhD, Donald Richard White, Professor, 3x gr grandson of James Steptoe LanghorneI am thrilled to introduce to many of you, our cousin Dr. Rick White, PhD, Chemist. Rick is the second great-grandchild of James Steptoe and Elizabeth Rachel Omohundro Langhorne, same as James Goodell, Roger Buck IV, PhD and I are. Pat Spangler above is their great-grandson. Rick is a Professor of Chemistry at St. John’s River State College in Jacksonville, Florida after a twenty plus year career in industry. He has also taught at Florida Southern College, and at the University of Tampa. He earned his PhD at the University of Florida and did post doctoral studies at King’s College in London. (At the time of his post doctoral work, the school was called Queen Elizabeth College, but Margaret Thatcher consolidated the colleges in the mid-1980’s and it became King’s) Rick has three sisters by the way, more cousins for us to enjoy. Another extremely accomplished professional, Rick has over 25 peer-reviewed publications, and over 200 internal company reports from his time with industry.

Rick worked for over twenty years for Procter and Gamble. Twelve of those years were spent in their Food and Beverage business before moving to their Health Care business where he worked for another ten years! He was an analytical chemist, supporting all aspects of product development, from inception to launch. Some of the products he worked with included brands you will recognize like Folger’s Coffee, Pringles Potato Chips, Citrus Hill Orange Juice, Pepto-Bismol, Metamucil, Crest Toothpaste, and Vick’s cough and cold remedies! Just think, from now on when you pick up one of those products, you will know that our DNA is part of the brain that helped develop them! We are very proud to be related to you Dr. Rick White!

Voorus House, Dorothy Pearl

Voorus Home in PA

Robert Voorus, 1891-1985, my cousin through the Spangler and Hogue families, had brothers and sisters  who were featured in the earlier educator posts. Robert worked in the Library of Congress as a young man. When he moved back to Pleasantville, Pennsylvania he taught at a Business School in Oil City, Pennsylvania. He is remembered by family as an excellent educator. 

Roger Buck,III was a master’s level Marine Biologist. He spent Buck, Walter Roger Buck, IIImost of his professional life researching for the Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Gloucester Point, VA, which is now part of William and Mary College for their Oceanography Concentration.  Roger not only researched heavily, but he taught at William and Mary College and earlier at Duke University. With all of his major accomplishments, Roger, my Uncle by marriage to Katherine Langhorne Kerse, was a kind and genteel man who raised a son and a daughter who both earned their  PhD.  His son, W. Roger Buck IV,  became an educator and research scientist as well, while his daughter Tyler Buck is a financial analyst and advisor with her own company.

Roger Buck, IV,PhD, my first cousin through the Kerse, buck, Walter roger Buck IVHouchins, Langhorne families, is a Professor of Geophysics at Columbia University in New York. His speciality is earthquakes and he researches through Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory in New York.  He has traveled the world lecturing and researching as he says, from “collecting rock samples for radiometric dating in Egypt, and in the Mojave Desert, to diving on the Reykjanes Mid-Ocean Ridge in a Russian submersible, and helping with GPS surveys on Iceland.” What amazing adventures this cousin has experienced!

I just want to make a couple observations regarding our families. The Langhornes were a wealthy family from England. But James Steptoe Langhorne became blind, several of his children, grandchildren and more, were blinded by the same inherited disease, his only natural son drowned at age 16, and after the Civil War, he was land poor and devastated!  Wouldn’t he be amazed and gratified that his grandchildren and greats would grow to be such good and educated people, and educators! He and his wife Elizabeth started a school and a Sunday School in Meadows of Dan, Virginia both of which were very important to them. We have carried on that philosophy–because it is imbedded in our DNA?  It is interesting!

The Hogues emigrated from Scotland, the Youngbloods from Germany, while the Voorhees originated in the Netherlands.  They fought in our Revolutionary War and our Civil War and many others. They were honorable people who supported their new country, but most of all, the Voorhees and  Hogues were Presbyterian Ministers and educators. It is amazing to me to see the traditions and/or the DNA at work in such a continuing fashion.

 What accomplishments for all of us to be proud of, and thankful for! Thank you our family members who educate all of us– for your inspiration, your wisdom, and your hard work! We honor all of you as you have honored us!

Teaching quote, wisest-mind-george-quote

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How the American Civil War Affected This Southern Woman and Many of Us–150 Years Later!

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–This blog post was originally written for and published on the blog “Worldwide Genealogy~A Genealogical Collaboration,” which you can access at: http://worldwidegenealogy.blogspot.com/2015/03/how-american-civil-war-affected-this.html

 

–from ancestry.com depicting Rebel vs. Yankee in Civil War

At my current age of sixty-six years, it was mostly my 2nd Great Grandfathers, eight in number, who fought in the Civil War. That whole generation was affected–those born in the 1830’s and 1840’s and dying in the war or after 1880. I remember how surprised I was to look at my family tree and realize that. I had put a little picture beside all the folks who fought in the war, and when I looked at my pedigree, there they were, all lined up–my 2nd Great Grandfathers!  One young 1st Great Grandfather lied about his age and entered the war early, and a couple of elderly 3rd Great Grandparents served as well, but mostly this was a tragedy for my 2nd Great Grandparents, who, thank heavens, had children before the war, or after, so that here I am, a product of all eight of them.

“The Civil War” as we call it in America, was fought between April, 1861 and April 1865. Many issues entered into the conflict, but the overriding matter of the day was slavery, especially the expansion of slavery into the western areas of the growing United States. Altogether, eleven  Southern States of the United States seceded, decided they no longer wanted to be a part of the United States of America, but wanted to join together as the Confederate States of America, often called the Confederacy, the South, or the Rebels. The United States forces were called the Union, the Yankees, or the North! After four years of battles, burning, and destruction, Wikipedia reports http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Civil_War that there were an “estimated 750,000 soldiers and an undetermined number of civilian casualties. One estimate of the death toll is that ten percent of all Northern males 20–45 years old, and 30 percent of all Southern white males aged 18–40 died.” We genealogical researchers in America have all probably noticed the many, many widows and fatherless families on the 1870 and 1880 censuses due to this terrible war. 

The Confederacy lost, the slaves were freed, and the South had to slowly rebuild and learn a new way of life.  After the war, almost everyone in the South was poor, their confederate money was no good.  Even the plantation owners were “land poor,” unable to afford to hire their former slaves or other workers to work their large fields!

This is the world in which I find my 2nd Great Grandparents living. For some reason, this was a shock to me. Until I started my genealogical research in 2012, I cared little for history, I am sorry to admit.  A person with a Master’s Degree, I did poorly in history classes, as they only meant dates and event names to memorize to me. Why didn’t someone ever explain to me that my family was there? It wasn’t just the movie “Gone With The Wind” that I should have modeled my scant knowledge of the Civil War upon–of all historical events. Did my parents really not know that their 1st Great Grandparents fought in the war, or was it that they were so busy surviving the depression and World War II, that history paled in comparison. Now that I am more aware, I am trying to correct that situation by writing stories of our ancestors and how they participated in and were affected by historical events. Now I know, that their participation in those events, affected me and my family’s choices in life, experiences in life…let me give you some examples:

Robert_E._Lee, public domain Wikicommons (1)

Robert E. Lee, public domain, Wikicommons

Growing up in Richmond, Virginia, the former Capital of the Confederacy, with statues of Robert E. Lee, Jefferson Davis, Stonewall Jackson, and JEB Stuart adorning our major thoroughfare, Monument Avenue, one could not help but feel a sense of pride in being “Southern.” Stories were everywhere, and the pride of being Southern lay not in the reality of the war, but in little girls’ visions of verandas and sweet tea, white gloves and hoop skirts! It had nothing to do with slavery, especially since even in 1960, when I was eleven years old, blacks were pretty much completely segregated from whites.  As a white child, I didn’t know it should be different, I am sorry to say. By the time I was six, I knew the “Rebel Yell,” which we used to summon our playmates when we went outdoors to play. The South was highly glorified of course. As I grew up, I learned that there was so much more to the story, of course.  My genealogical research helped me truly understand.

One of my four maternal 2nd Great Grandfathers  was Robert Kerse, an Irish emigrant arriving in America in  1850 at age 18.  He married and had three of his ten children by 1861, then fought in the Civil War as a Confederate, protecting his own city of Richmond, Virginia.  His one and only horse was shot out from under him! Right on Fold 3, a genealogical site for military research, I can find his muster roll sheets, and letters from his superiors attesting to the fact that his horse was shot out from under him in battle, and that his claim against the US government after the war, to get a new horse, should be honored.  Oh my gracious!

Robert Kerse– in the U.S., Civil War Soldier Records and Profiles, 1861-1865
Name:
Robert Kerse
Rank at enlistment:
Private
State Served:
Virginia
Service Record:
Enlisted in Company B, Virginia 2nd Infantry Regiment.
Sources:
Index to Compiled Confederate Military Service Records

Another maternal 2nd great grandfather, James Steptoe Langhorne, called Steptoe, was blind, but owned a huge, 13,000 acre plantation in Patrick County, Virginia. His family stretches back to Jamestown. He did not fight in the war obviously, but he did have the experience of having the Yankee forces steal his horse! The story, involving Steptoe and his daughter Fannie  was originally told to me by my cousins. (cousins found through genealogical research) brothers, and Fannie’s grandsons: Harvey Langhorne Spangler and Dr. Daniel Patrick Spangler, PhD)     

“At the time Miss Fannie Langhorne was ten, and the Civil War was being fought, Stoneman brought his Yankee army from Tennessee down what is now the J.E.B. Stuart highway. In passing they annexed one of Mr. Langhorne’s horses which happened to be his favorite. He, though blind, accompanied by his small daughter Fanny, insisted on following the army to Stuart in search of his horse. There the captain agreed to allow him to retrieve his horse if he could recognize him. Mr. Langhorne set Fanny to hunt the animal. After walking down the long line of horses hitched to the racks along the road and back again, she was unable to find him. On her return, however at one side, away from the rest, she saw her father’s mount and immediately squealed in delight. Mr. Langhorne was led over to a tall roan mare, not his, but near the one Fanny had discovered, and told to see if that were his. Fanny squealed to the contrary, but Mr. Langhorne turned to her and said, “You don’t understand the joke”. Then his hand was placed on another, his own; this time he said, “This is my horse, but not my bridle”.   (If you’d like, you can find this story here: http://www.mtnlaurel.com/mountain-memories/406-fannie-langhorne-spangler-an-interview-from-1935.html) That took courage and audacity, on his and young Fannie’s part!   

My third maternal 2nd great grandfather, William W. Stoops also served in the Civil War. He served in Company G, 21st Regiment, Virginia Cavalry.  It was made up of older men who could not do the long marches so it was a cavalry that stayed close to home to protect railroads, bridges, and mines.

My fourth maternal 2nd Great Grandfather was an Italian Immigrant, Louis Botto. It looks like he arrived in America perhaps about 1844, and he and his wife, my grandmother, Catherine Revaro Botto, had their first child in Richmond, Virginia, in 1857. I believe he had a brother named Frank Botto, and we can clearly see Frank registered to fight in the Civil War. Unfortunately, although I can find Louis Botto in the 1860 census, I’ve yet to find him anywhere else, except that his wife is listed in the phone book as the widow of Louis Botto and by 1866, she has remarried.  I wonder if Louis was killed in the war? Did he get sick and die? Did he leave the family, as I find Louis Bottos in several other areas of the country? I still have a ways to go in my research to prove this.

While part of my mother’s family traces back to Jamestown, the founding colony of America, as you can see, my family is a melting pot of nationalities. So as I grew up “basking in the glory” of being a “Southern Belle” (not really, not from age 12 on), what about my paternal side?  I did realize, as I grew older,  that my father’s side of the family were Yankees.  Not only that, when I started doing my genealogical research, I discovered that my father’s  Grandfather, my first great grandfather, Lewis Jacob Youngblood, 1846-1919, fought in the Battle of Petersburg,Virginia, as part of a New Jersey Cavalry Regiment!  After the war, he came back and lived in Petersburg where he had fought, because supposedly he “thought it was such a beautiful area.”  This past year, one of my cousins’ found Lewis’s discharge papers from the Civil War!  I got to see them as well as his sword, and his gun, all owned now by different cousins!  Kay Youngblood Fuller, my cousin, owns not only his discharge papers, but found his own journal which explains that he was an IRS tax collector for the Federal Government, and that he readily foreclosed on farms, and often bought them himself–farms in the Petersburg area– when recovering Confederates were unable to pay! What a way to get revenge on your enemies! He was a carpetbagger! My own Great Grandfather was a carpetbagger! “In United States history, a carpetbagger was a Northerner (Yankee) who moved to the South after the American Civil War, especially during the Reconstruction era (1865–1877), in order to profit from the instability and power vacuum that existed at this time.”   –http://www.history.com/topics/american-civil-war/carpetbaggers-and-scalawags–also the source for this illustration below:

carpetbagger-AB

One cousin told me that when Lewis moved to Petersburg, he joined the local Methodist Church, Gary’s Methodist Church.  They say he was so hated, that when he came into the church and sat down, the whole congregation stood up and moved to the other side of the church! My poor grandfather and his siblings had to grow up this way! How would Lewis Jacob  feel to think that 100 years later, he had a great granddaughter who prided herself in her Southern heritage!

Youngblood, Lewis Jacob, discharge papers from Civil War

-for pictures of Lewis Jacob Youngblood’s rifle and sword from the Civil War, see my blog post at https://heart2heartstories.com/2014/11/05/lewis-jacob-youngblood-1846-1919-52-ancestors-in-52-weeks-44/

 

Hugh Jackson Hogue, 1825-1870, Pennsylvania is my 2nd great grandfather on my father’s side, and is of Scottish descent. He, along with his son, my great grandfather, Robert Fulton Hogue, 1850-1924, also fought at the Battle of Petersburg, and Robert came back to settle there as well! Robert was underage, only 15,  when he joined his Dad in Petersburg, and served as a bugle boy, a water boy, and took care of the horses. In later  years,  Robert’s daughter, Helen Blanche Hogue married Edwin Spear Youngblood, son of Lewis Jacob Youngblood, both children of Yankees who relocated to Petersburg, Virginia, both families members of Gary’s Methodist Church.  Had the fathers met in the war, or did they meet in church when being shunned by others?  What would it have been like to grow up in a small southern town, a yankee revenue agent for a father, just after the Civil War? How is it that Edwin  and Helen’s son married a Southern girl from Richmond, Virginia? Of course, she was only partially a  “Southern girl”–she, my mother, was Irish and Italian also, and proud of those heritages.

My other two paternal great grandfathers did not participate in the Civil War, one, Edwin Speer whose ancestors hailed from the Netherlands and Germany,  was too old, with the next generation too young. The other was a German emigrant, Gustavus Voelkler who only arrived in America about the time the Civil War was ending. Lucky them.

Again, the melting pot is evident. Dad’s family includes Scots, Germans, and Netherlanders mostly. Mom’s English, Irish, and Italian mostly. It always amazes me! The Kerse’s of Ireland, were originally the DesCearsais family of France!

One hundred fifty years from now, 2015, will be the year 2165. It’s possible I will have a 2nd or 3rd great grandchild who is my age by then. What will I have done that they might discover that will affect the way they think of me, or the way they think period, the way they regard history? Wow, that’s a humbling thought, yet now I know that my ancestors affected history, they fought, they struggled, they were there. They have affected me by sharing their beliefs, their courage and strong wills, their desire to make a difference–traits I feel in myself today!  

Would I have been a Confederate or Yankee if I were alive during the Civil War?  If I were a child, of course, I’d have done whatever my family did, and possibly been a southern Confederate. However, after all these years of being proud of my Southern heritage, I could never support slavery…so I suspect I would have been a Union sympathizer if not an outright flag waving Yankee! I see this same type of civil strife continuing everyday of my life. Our country in 2015 is about as polarized between the Democrats and Republicans as it was in 1861! Some even think we’re moving again towards a Civil War! While I feel very strongly about my political views, would I pick up a gun and shoot someone over it? I can’t imagine!  I might get angry at a neighbor or family member who believes so very differently from me– that doesn’t mean I don’t respect their right to have those views, just not to force them on me. Having strong beliefs can lead to conflicts, broken families, even wars, I see it in my own family, and in our world.

What might your descendents think of you, of your lifetime? –our lifetime? It’s a lot to consider, but our genealogical research leads us to these questions.

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Youngblood, James C. 1841-1897, My Great Grand Uncle Is Found! –52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks, #43

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James C Youngblood has been missing ! (Only from my family tree!) I didn’t have him in the list of children born to Jacob and Mariah Charlotte Cooper Youngblood, and now that I have added him, I have only found him in one other family tree in Ancestry.com, which tells us he is not well-known!  Of course, this makes me wonder how many other “children” I might have left out of the large families popular in days gone by! I hate to think of it! My own husband’s great, great-grandfather was left out of  the line of Holshouser children born to his family, and his whole line of Holshousers were not invited to the extended Holshouser reunion for 25+ years, until a wise genealogist “discovered” his line! It can make a huge difference! Because of this personal experience, I have generally tried to be very careful to pick up all the children in a family, and to try to get them in the correct order. It is not easy, and not always possible! Censuses, wills, all help, but they are not panaceas! 

John H. Youngblood, born in Germany in 1780, my third great-grandfather, was our first American immigrant in this family line. He came over and settled in New Jersey, in the town of Frelinghuysen, Warren County.  He married Mary whose maiden name is unknown. We have not been able to trace his parents or his town of origin either. I have them as having only two children, which is very unusual those days. Their children were Jacob Youngblood, 1807-1887, and Elizabeth Youngblood, b. 1810. Elizabeth married one John Case and together they had eleven children. Jacob Youngblood, her brother, from whom I descend, married Mariah Charlotte Cooper and they had six children it now seems. Their six children included:  

We have a Youngblood family group on facebook where we share pictures and discuss all kinds of things including dna and genealogy. It is helping us get to know cousins far and wide. Almost everyone in our group at this point, is a descendant of Lewis Jacob Youngblood above. Recently, I found the gravestone of Jacob Youngblood and his wife Mariah on Billion Graves.  I could plainly see that there were two other names on the stone, and planned to figure out what it said, and who they were, but I was so excited, I went ahead and placed the picture on Facebook in our family group! It was then that my eagle-eyed cousin, Kay Youngblood Fuller, immediately called my attention to it, asking “Just who is that James C. Youngblood whose name is on the stone? ”  I was like, ” Hmm…I don’t know! ” I had assumed it was a child of his, but when I checked his family, there was no James C!  The interesting thing is, Kay Youngblood Fuller’s  father was James Cooper Youngblood b. 1917. and her grandfather was James Cooper Youngblood, b. 1875!! They were both children of Lewis Jacob Youngblood b. 1846–the brother of this James C. Youngblood. Yet, James C. Youngblood was the son of Mariah C. Cooper, where the name came from, did he not have children? We know he married, because his wife is buried with him, it says so on the stone. In fact, it says Jacob died in 1887, his wife Mariah Cooper in 1869, James C. in 1897, and his wife Mary Frances Lawrence in 1908. James C. was 56 years old when he died, yet, he and Mary had one child born in 1880 I believe, named Frank! 

James C. Youngblood ended up being an interesting person to get to know. Part of that is because I was with my cousin Kay Youngblood Fuller, and we researched him together! On his US Civil War Draft Registration Records, available on ancestry.com, we find James C. listed as a “law student” at age 22 in 1863.  According to the U.S. Civil War Soldier Records and Profiles, James C. Youngblood enlisted in Company E, New Jersey 1st Infantry Regiment on 27 June, 1863. It says he mustered out on 24 July 1863, at Trenton, NJ. This is available on Ancestry.com, provided by the register of Officers and Men of New Jersey in the Civil War, 1861-1865. One Month! Only one month? Good job if you can get it! I’ll have to see if I can find out more about this in further research. 

On the 1880 Census, James C. is listed as a lawyer,  is living with his wife Mary Frances Lawrence, at 356 Madison Street, Morris, New Jersey,  and they have  a 3 month old son named Frank!  Also living with them is his mother-in-law Hannah Lawrence,  his own sister Hattie Youngblood, age 21, and a cook named Rosa McDonald. I assumed Frank was the child of Mary Frances Lawrence and James C. Youngblood, but look beside his name on this census. It looks to me like it sas “McD son”–is he the son of James C. Youngblood and his cook, Rose McDonald? ! I did try tracking Rose McDonald, and on the 1920 census she has a son named Frank McDonald. However, our Frank has married, divorced  and moved to Michigan by 1920. 

Youngblood, James C. 1880 census

 Of course, all the 1890 censuses burned, and James C. died in 1897, so what happened to Frank? We find Frank alive and well, living with Mary Lawrence  at the age of 20 on the 1900 census!  In 1910, we find Frank in Philadelphia, working as a mechanical engineer, and living as a boarder with the Westbrook family, by then his Margaret Lawrence  had also died. 

I did find a passport for Frank. Here we learn that his full name is  Francis (Frank) James Youngblood. Apparently  named for both his mother and his father. He was born March 14, 1880, in NJ, and has Hazel eyes, an oval face, and dark brown hair.  He is living in Boston at this time, 1909, and he is 29 years old!

Youngblood, Frank, passport

 

 In 1918, we find a  Draft Registration Card for WWI in the US for one Frank J. Youngblood. His nearest relative is listed as Lina May Youngblood. (Thanks to Aquilla and Cathy Meder Dempsey for their help deciphering this.)  They are living in Philadelphia.  I found  later records , one listing a Francis J. Youngblood married to a Lina May in 1920. Another lists a Frank J. Youngblood with a sister named Lina May! Amazing! I have come to believe that this Registration Card is not even for our Frank! By 1920 he was divorced from Lillian May (very close!) but living in Wayne Michigan! Its so confusing! This is when you have to remember that all research is a process, as you gather and sort information. I would have just left this out entirely, but in my first post, before I corrected it, I had asked for help,a nd I appreciate those who responded, greatly! We shall see where all this leads. 

Youngblood, Frank, Draft Registration Card for WW1

 On the 1920 census, we find Frank working as the automotive mechanical engineer he is, in an automobile factory in Michigan! But how sad, he is divorced! A bit more research comes up with a marriage certificate to one Lillian May Shallow in 1910, with a divorce from her in 1912. As far as I can tell, they did not have children. On the 1930 census Frank still lives in a hotel in Wayne, Michigan, alone, and still works as an automotive, mechanical engineer.   James died in 1934, at the age of 54, in Essex, Ontario, Canada. It appears he had traveled there on business and had only been in the country 4 days according to his death certificate. A friend was the informant, and did get his father correct, his place and year of birth and other things. He died of tuberculosis, which it says he’d had for 3  years! I am shocked that he was allowed to continue working, and to travel between the US and Canada! How sad to have the line end this way. Obviously Frank and his Father James C. were intelligent and talented, one a lawyer, and one a mechanical engineer. It’s sad that he did not have children for us to get to know! 

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Gardener Extraordinaire–Helen Blanche Hogue Youngblood, 1881-1964-52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks

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Could I have inherited my love of gardening from my paternal grandmother? Helen Blanche Hogue Youngblood, 1881 – 1964, was my father’s mother and lived with us until she died when I was 15 years old. She loved to garden so we always had beautiful flowers in our yard.

 

 

Grandma, as we called her, was always a bit distant but kind to me as a child. However, she had a reputation of being a no-nonsense woman. She ruled the roost, and always had for her own four children and her husband, Edwin Spear Youngblood. She was German and Scottish in ancestry, the daughter of Robert Fulton Youngblood, 1850, who fought in the Civil War. After the war her family moved to the South from Pennsylvania.  Settling in Petersburg, Virginia, they were known as carpetbaggers, and her family of six children was generally rejected by the community. There is a story passed down in the family that says when they would attend church at the Methodist church in Petersburg, people near them would rise and move to the other side of the church! Emotions ran high towards “yankees” in the South after the Civil War. Helen’s father and husband were farmers, but she and her husband lost their farm when the Great Depression hit the United States. By that time, Grandma  had four grown children, and her two sons built a house for them in Richmond Virginia. My father Cecil, bought out his brother Fulton’s half of the house after he was married, Dad’s father had died, and he decided to raise his own family of four children in the house he had helped buy for his mother and father. I spent the first 22 years of my life living in that lovely stone house.

 

Every spring and every fall,Grandma had a ritual. She had about 50 plants in pots that she kept in her large bedroom and walk-in closet upstairs in the stone house. Every spring we would form a line and carry every pot outside! The pots had to be lined up exactly right along the edge of the stone front porch. Every fall it was back again—up the stairs onto the tables and garden display racks. This ritual marked the beginning and end of our summers as clearly as Memorial Day and Labor Day.

  I remember the joy also, the joy of having a huge garden full of daffodils in the spring that we were free to pick and carry to our teachers, neighbors, and whoever we chose. I loved doing that. We always had snowball bushes, and grandma told us that when the snowballs fell off the bushes in May, we could begin to go barefooted outside. I can remember clearly shaking those bushes vigorously along with my brother in hopes that the snowballs would fall to the ground and we could run around outside without our shoes.

 Along our back walkway grew Lily of the Valley. They smelled so sweet as you walked from the driveway to the entrance. When I was  about 10 years old, my grandmother was President of the local garden club and they held a contest for children to create and enter a dish garden. I remember Grandma and myself  working together to design a dish garden that illustrated the song, “White Coral Bells”. I remember planting the Lily of the Valley in my dish garden along with little pebbles for the walkway which illustrated the song perfectly. Amazingly, in researching newspaper archives for my genealogical research, I came across a newspaper article about my winning a blue ribbon for that entry. What a surprise!

lily of the valley “White choral bells, upon  a slender stalk. Lily of the Valley grace my garden walk. Oh how I wish, that I could hear them ring. That will happen only when the faires sing.”

 There is so much more I’d like to tell you about this complex woman. Her mother Helen Voelkler was the daughter of German immigrants. They were a musically talented family, with my second great-grandfather Gustavus Voelkler born 1834 in Altenburg, Saxony. Gustavus owned his own music school and was principal of the music department at Dickenson Seminary in Williamsport, Pennsylvania

 Her father Robert Fulton Hogue, however, was Scottish. If he was anything like his son, my great-uncle Robert Clay Hogue, he was quiet, contemplative, and intense. There was abuse in the family and my own grandmother Helen had a history of being abusive to some people. Where did that come from? Who had the uncontrolled  temper? The German Voelklers, Youngbloods, or the Scottish Hogue’s? 

My mother always worked outside of the home as did my dad. Therefore Grandma was in charge of our family life when I was a child. I remember that we went outdoors to play in the morning and were required to be home in time for dinner at 6:00 pm. We always had dinner around the dining room table at 6 pm, you were not allowed to be tardy for fear of corporal punishment. My job was to set the table for the seven of us-Mom, Dad, four children and grandmother. After dinner, my sister and I washed and put away the dishes.  We did this everyday, day in and day out for many years. My sister had a repetitive dream that she was 113 years old, I was 107, and we lived together, and were doing dishes together still! (It makes me laugh.) She always washed and I always dried and put things away. The boys of course were required to do “boy’s work” like mow the grass, empty the trash, and work on the car if need be. With four children in the house, however, there was always fun to be had no matter what else was going on.

 Grandmother had a keen sense of smell. She was almost deaf, and nearsighted. But we all knew she could smell trouble. Since our parents left early for work, we  children would catch the school bus and go to school on our own. I remember one day, when my little brother was in nursery school still, and my older sister was off in high school, but Cecil and I went to the same elementary school. That morning we missed the school bus because we were late getting out to the stop. Instead of walking to school as we could have and should have, we decided to play hooky. Instead of staying outside and playing all day somewhere away from the house, for some reason we sneaked back into the house and hid in our parents’ closet. At lunchtime, after Grandma went upstairs for a nap, we sneaked out to get something to eat. Not thinking about grandma’s keen sense of smell, we cooked some Campbell’s soup! Not only that but we carried our bowls of soup into the closet along with our crackers and drinks. Our parents would have killed us if they had known!. We cleaned up the kitchen but just as we were slipping back into the closet with our soup, down the stairs came grandma! We could hear her searching from room to room as she muttered under her breath, “ I know I smelled something, there was something cooking, what could it possibly have been? It smells like something’s burning.” She was looking behind every chair and curtain . We froze in the closet –sure of imminent discovery. Amazingly grandma did not find us that day. We were very lucky and we knew it. My brother and I agreed that our skipping school days were over, and that it was easier just to go to school! I can only laugh when I remember the trauma/drama of that day.

 Today I love my flowers. In the spring and summer I rush outside every morning anticipating what new bloom I might see! I usually have my camera with me. But it’s also interesting, that while I am quite nearsighted, and slightly hard of hearing, I also have a keen sense of smell. Could I truly have inherited a love of flowers and a strong sense of smell from my grandmother? Better to enjoy the magnolias, the gardenia, and the Lily of the Valley, say I! Thank heavens I do not have an anger issue and have never been abusive. I do believe we have broken that cycle. The  issues of dna, and nature versus nurture are interesting ones, but I already  know, as I explore my own gardens, that I inherited this interest from my paternal grandmother. It is a gift I appreciate greatly. 

 

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