Heart of a Southern Woman

A snapshot of life one blog post at a time.

Childhood Recollections of Our Goat Billy– as told to this author by her Cousin Ron Hogue on his 80th Birthday!

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Ron Hogue

Ron and I met on Ancestry–we have never met in person!  We are fourth cousins through my father’s mother’s line!  (Let me hear you say that five times!) Our mutual interest in genealogy and family history, plus our DNA match sealed the deal, leading to our great friendship! Yesterday, Ron turned 80 years old–or maybe that was 8, a mere child, according to him!  LOL  

We talked via video chatting on Facebook, we are so tech savvy!  LOL  After the “congratulations”, we talked about his sadness over the loss just a few months ago of his beloved wife  Dorie Hogue. Turning eighty didn’t feel as great without his best friend of 62 years!

However, as we talked, Ron shared a phone conversation he’d had earlier in the day with his sister Sue. Ron lives in Wisconsin, Sue is  in Minnesota, and I am in North Carolina!  They had reminisced about their childhood, in a rural area just outside of Park Falls, Wisconsin.  Many of the stories brought our laughter bubbling up from the depths of our souls!

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https://kids.spcaeducation.org.nz/animal-care/goats/freedom-from-pain-injury-or-disease/

We were talking about pets, as he just got a new kitty for his birthday. He recalled that when he was a boy, his family had chickens, dogs, cats, and his especially beloved Billy Goat!  He recalled  tussles with the rooster pecking at him and other family members.  He could clearly describe the fascinating hens  with their red feathers and green feather topknots! But Billy—was his love, and his nemesis!  LOL

 

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Stubborn Goat

Ron recalled that it was his job to put the free-ranging goat back into his cage every night!  Of course, the goat wanted no part of leaving his beloved freedom, so he turned into a stubborn Donkey!  Twelve year-old Ron could be seen wrestling with the goat–determined to “be the boss”, LOL–as he tugged the goat while the goat just dug his front legs in deeper and lowered his head, but never charged our Ron!  LOL

The story I loved however, was when Ron told me that he remembered his grandmother spoiling Billy the Goat as if he were her baby.  Billy would come to a back hall door of the farm house in which they lived.  He’d bleat until Grandma would come to the door to say  “Good Mornin’ Billy!”  Then she would step back, swing the door wide, and Billy would trot right into the house–head held high and a big smile on his face–trotting right through other rooms until he reached the kitchen!  There he stood right in front of the cabinet holding the bread box, and began to bleat loudly again!  Grandma would say “Okay, okay, its coming Billy, be patient!”  LOL  Then she would open the bread box and take out one slice of bread–giving it to the hungry, expectant goat!  Nodding his head in thanks, Billy clamped the bread tight in his mouth, turned, and trotted right back out the back door!  Once outside, he gobbled his tasty morsel and bleated his thanks again as he ran off to play with the other animals!

 

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Wow!  Can’t you see it, can’t you feel the charm, the love, the sense of family and community! What a story! Thanks so much for sharing it with me cousin Ron Hogue!  What a treasure–both you and the story! So glad we both love family and genealogy! 

 

 

 

 

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Family Pictures Found–Unidentified–Part 3

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Youngblood sibs in snow, Gwendolyn, Cecil, Helen, unknown and Fulton

You might want to read the last two posts before reading this one–it might make more sense if you do.   You can find part one here, and part two here.

We are discussing pictures found recently by this author Helen’s sister in Richmond,Virginia. There were about fifty pictures of family members found in a small album never seen by any of the living siblings of this family, all in our  60’s and 70’s now. Only two of the fifty pictures were identified, but thanks to that, and to  other family pictures allowing us to identify  some others, we decided that more than likely, these were pictures that belonged to our Father’s family–his Dad’s German Youngblood family,and his mother’s Scotish Hogue family.

Since I am the active amateur genealogist of the family and family historian, who is also most in touch with other family members, cousins, and DNA matches, through social media groups, etc., I eagerly took pictures of the newfound 100 year-old photographs to work on trying to identify as many as possible.

Who are the most likely family members in these pictures? For that answer, I went to our family tree.  Even  though I include all the parents and siblings, I truly believe most of these pictures come from the family of Edwin Spear Youngblood and his wife Helen Blanche Hogue, which includes my father.

 

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The family of  Robert Fulton Hogue, Sr. b. 1850, with his children and grandchildren.  One of those children is my father’s mother i–Helen Blanche Hogue, child III.

 

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The family of Lewis Jacob Youngblood with his siblings, his children and grandchildren.  My father’s family is shown with  his father Edwin Spear Youngblood as child  #5.

 

With that in mind, I wonder if Edwin Spear Youngblood and /or his wife, Helen Blanch Hogue  Youngblood, my paternal grandparents, are in any of these found pictures!  Two of my cousins wrote to me yesterday to identify Helen B.  –and look–these are known portraits of them that I have on my own living room wall.

 

 

What happens if I compare these to some of the found pictures on the family search compare-a-face site? Yes!  Helen is a match!  

 

Helen Blanche Hogue Youngblood known on left, and unknown

 

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unknown picture to identify, now seen as Helen Blanche Hogue-Youngblood

Here below, is an older, known picture of my paternal grandmother, Helen Blanche Hogue Youngblood that I took myself when I was about age 15! She would have been 84. How does it compare to  the picture of her younger self above?  Wow!  95%! Wow!

 

 

Below is one of the unidentified pictures of a young man–it looks a bit to me like it could be Edwin, could it be?  I’m not at all sure, but look,family search compare-a-face says it is more than likely! What do you think?

 

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Edwin Sear YOungblood compared with younger self maybe

 

Here’s another unknown single young man, is this Edwin Spear also?  

 

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This is so very interesting!  I hope a lot of relatives will stop by to comment and give advice, on ancestry, Facebook, or where ever you find me!  Thanks and happy ancestor hunting!

PS, I think there might have to be one more post—  part 4, and I promise to stop then!  LOL Well…maybe. 

 

 

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The James River of Virginia, Flows Through My Family’s Life–from Jamestown to Present Day

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James River near the Huguenot Bridge, Richmond,Virginia. Photo by Betty S. Conner, with permission.

In the last few days, I had the joy of visiting my home town of Richmond, Virginia.  A couple of friends from my youth, Betty S. Conner and Karen Bonner Allen, took me on a tour of our old neighborhoods which included a leisurely roll by the James River–a river that ran through our neighborhoods, our city, and our state. As I gazed at the river, reminiscing with friends, memories swelled within me of all the lifetime moments–adventures, joys and sorrows associated with that beautiful river!

Upon returning home and sharing these thoughts with others, a cousin reminded me of how prominently the James River had featured in the life of our family since the inception of  our country and the Colony of Jamestown!   Wow!  I had not thought of it that way…suddenly my thoughts expanded and encompassed  not only my own life, my immediate family’s life, but my  grandparent’s, my 3rd Great-Grandparents, and all the way back to, yes—the 1650’s when my 8th Great-Grandfather John Langhorne (1642 -1687) born in England, sailed to Virginia. There on the James River he established the Gambell Plantation, east of the Colony of Jamestown.  I grew up on that same James River–only about 60 miles west of the plantation settled by John Langhorne.

 

This article from Wikipedia gives a great description of the size and scope of the James River:  “The James River is a river in the U.S. state of Virginia that begins in the Appalachian Mountains and flows 348 miles (560 km)[3] to Chesapeake Bay…. It is the longest river in Virginia and the 12th longest river in the United States that remains entirely within a single state. Jamestown and Williamsburg, Virginia’s first colonial capitals, and Richmond, Virginia’s current capital, lie on the James River.”–https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_River

Developing a timeline helped me think about and realize the true scope of the James River’s importance to and influence on my mother’s ancestral family, the Langhornes especially. Our historian cousin, Betty Smith shared her knowledge and insight as to the importance the river served in our family. (read more in former blog post:  https://heart2heartstories.com/2014/12/30/jamestowne-colony-ancestors-20-grandparents-including-capt-christopher-newport-52-ancestors-in-52-wee )

1607: 

Jamestown in the Virginia Colony was founded.  My 9th Great-Grandfather, Capt. Christopher Newport, (1561–1617)  “was an English seaman and privateer. He is best known as the captain of the Susan Constant, the largest of three ships which carried settlers for the Virginia Company in 1607 on the way to found the settlement at Jamestown in the Virginia Colony, which became the first permanent English settlement in North America. He was also in overall command of the other two ships on that initial voyage, in order of their size, the Godspeed and the Discovery.” –https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christopher_Newport

 

1666:

John Langhorne, 1642-1687, my 8th Great-Grandfather and our first immigrant to America in the Langhorne family, settled in Warwick County, Virginia in 1666 with his wife, the former Rebecca Carter of Bristol, England. The family home was known as “Gambell” and overlooked the James River from a plantation of 2,000 acres. (for more reading see blog post re. John Langhorne of Gambell:  https://heart2heartstories.com/2014/07/22/john-langhorne-arrives-in-the-royal-colony-of-virginia-about-1666-and-his-descendants-reunion-next-week-)

 

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–map included in The Virginia Langhornes by James C. Langhorne, 2013, Blackwell Press, Lynchburg, Virginia

1790:

Gambell remained the family home for over 100 years in our direct line bringing us to my third Great-Grandfather, Henry Scarsbrooke Langhorne (1790-1854) born at Gambell on the James River.

 

1831:

As the planting of tobacco was no longer as profitable as it had once been, Henry S. Langhorne and his wife Frances Callaway Steptoe (1798-1832) my 3rd Great-Grandparents, moved to Lynchburg, where he established the second largest milling venture in Virginia at that time. Betty Smith shared with us that Langhorne Mills in Lynchburg,  was also known as the Lynchburg Milling Company. It was started in 1831 by brothers Maurice and Henry S. Langhorne, but after a few years, Henry bought out his brother’s share. In the mill they produced different kinds of flour.

Henry never abandoned planting though, and continued to buy numerous plantations in Bedford, Campbell and Amherst Counties. His 13,000 acre plantation located in Patrick County, Virginia was inherited by his son James Steptoe Langhorne, (1822-1905), my  2nd Great-Grandfather.   In 1845, Henry retired and relocated to “Cloverdale”, a 3,500-acre Botetourt County plantation.    Another invaluable source for family history is the book, The Virginia Langhornes, by  my cousin, James Callaway Langhorne, published in 2013 by Blackwell Press in Lynchburg, Virginia–and of course, my cousin himself.

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Langhorne Mills in Lynchburg, Virginia, also known as the Lynchburg Milling Company. from Flickr.com

1860-1905:

Henry’s eldest son John Scarsbrook Langhorne (1817-1886) married Sarah Elizabeth Dabney of Edgemont plantation, a great-granddaughter of William Randolph II of Chatesworth plantation.  John inherited Langhorne Mills, along with the bulk of his father’s estate. John was the grandfather of Lady Astor, Nancy Langhorne. (see former blog post: https://heart2heartstories.com/2014/04/28/nancy-witcher-lady-astor-langhorne-52-ancestors-in-52-weeks-17/

The mill produced specialized flours and shipped their products and tobacco down the James River to markets in Richmond and below, in specially designed, flat bottomed, shallow-drafted Bateau boats. Today, Virginians celebrate the history of the Bateau boats with a festival on the James River every year, which several family members attend.

Betty Smith shares that during the Civil War, Lynchburg had  only one battle with the Union, an attack led by Maj. Gen. David Hunter and his soldiers destroyed the mill’s supplies, the  boats, and tore up what few railroad lines existed.  Hunter’s attempt to capture the city was defeated by forces under the leadership of Lt. Gen. Jubal Anderson Early, my 3rd cousin, 3x removed.  The current mill owner, John Langhorne (1817-1886) and his family used the mill for a hospital for Confederate soldiers.

1920-1940:

Fifteen years later, my grandmother Katherine Steptoe Houchins Kearse,  child of Evelyn Langhorne, is sailing the James River with her husband in their boat, “The Lady Jane”. Tragically, their only son of seven children, Thomas Philip Kearse, Jr. drowned in the James River at age 8, in 1922. My mother and aunts talked of “The Lady Jane” and their adventures often and lovingly.  You can read more about  “The Lady Jane” in this former blog post: https://heart2heartstories.com/2014/03/03/thomas-philip-kerse-captains-the-lady-jane-52-ancestors-in-52-weeks/

 

The Lady Jane sails the James River near Richmond, Virginia.  Personal Photo library of Helen Y. Holshouser. The boat belonged to  her grandfather Thomas Phillip Kearse.

 

2019:

Another 70 years and I have grown up on the James River, along with cousins, brothers, sister and friends– boating, swimming, fishing, and just nourishing our souls — connecting with ancestors who arrived in Jamestown Colony on the James River in Virginia! No wonder the river speaks to me –it flows through my DNA and is imprinted on my soul!

–About a 350-year span of lifetimes—–ALL INVOLVED WITH OR DEPENDENT UPON THE JAMES RIVER ❤️

 

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Uncle Langhorne killed cousin Charles Edie? Shock!

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There was a murder–162 years ago– January 27, 1857, at a private, all- male college in Virginia– Hampden Sydney College.   I had never heard of the event until three days ago.  I traveled to my sister’s home, in Richmond, Virginia–er husband and son attended Hampden Suydney.  She showed me an alumni magazine with this story featured on  the cover!  Since the man who was accused of murder was one Edward “Ned” Alexander Langhorne, we were all interested in discovering whether or not he was related to us. (the Langhorne family is on my mother’s side of the family.)

When I got home, I researched  him with the help of my daughter Annie Holshouser.  What a surprise to learn that  he was a fairly close family member–he was my 3rd great Uncle, actually a half- Uncle on my mother’s side of the family. . Sadly, the other Hampden Sydney student he murdered was his best friend!  How tragic, they were only 18, both lives ruined!  The student who died was named Charles Taylor Edie–I thought to myself, “Edie sounds familiar…oh my  gracious–suppose he is related to us also? ”  And of course, he is–a 2nd cousin five times removed, on my Father’s side of the family!  Oh my gracious, oh my gracious! 

The story goes that on the morning of January 27, 1857, Ned went to confront his “best friend” Charles over his behavior towards a young woman and Ned himself, the night before.  It is said that Charles had been drinking heavily the night before. It is also said that Charles was stronger, bigger and tougher than Ned, so Ned’s other friends had encouraged him to carry a weapon in case he needed to protect himself, if he was to confront the fearsome Charles–his BEST FRIEND!  But Ned was a “gentleman”, who could not disobey the “Honor Code” which demanded a duel in response to such humiliation as Charles had dished out to him. So…Ned carries a borrowed knife and a pistol to go and confront his friend!  Really? There are many details to this story…I will tell you where you can read them for yourself!  It is quite a story!

Of course, hungover college boys are dangerous when tempers flare and friends egg you on! Can’t  you hear the  the chants…”fight, fight!” Fight they did, punching, kicking and finally–stabbing–right through the heart the knife went!  The life of Charles Edie,  age 18, was ended by Edward Langhorne!

Ned was arrested of course and placed in jail! His trial took place on March 13, 1857.  Many people testified on his behalf, although many , including ministers in the community denounced him and the Honor Code of Dueling!  In his book, The Virginia Langhornes, 2013, Blackwell Press, Lynchburg, Virginia, pg. 210, author James Callaway Langhorne gives this great description: Ned’s “subsequent murder trial was one of the great legal spectacles of antebellum Virginia. Although he was acquitted to “such cheering that the judge had to clear the courtroom in order to restore order and discharge the jury,” the incident colored the remainder of his short life!”

Let me tell you a bit about both of  these “boys”. Charles Edie, was born in 1838, in Christiansburg, Montgomery County, Virginia, USA.  His parents were Dr. Joseph Speers Edie, M.D. who had previously taught at Hamden Sydney, and later anguished between earning his doctorate of divinity as he felt called to the ministry, or getting a medical degree as he also felt strongly called to heal.  He was the local doctor in town for many years! His reputation was that of a very kind man who served rich and poor with equal care and talent.   Charles’s mother was Elizabeth Randolph White Edie, of the famous Virginia Randolph family!  Can you imagine dedicating your life to healing others, but not being available to help your mortally wounded child!  What a nightmare!   

Edward “Ned” Alexander Langhorne was born in 1837, the son of wealthy planter, miller, business tycoon and owner of multiple plantations throughout Virginia and other states–my third great-grandfather, Henry Scarsbrook Langhorne, 1790-1854.  Henry was married twice and Edward is the son of him and his second wife, Ann Eliza Scott.  My family descends from Henry and his first wife, Frances Callaway Steptoe through his son James Steptoe Langhorne, 1822, called “Grandpa Steptoe” and his wife Elizabeth Rachel Omohundro. Also descending from sons of Henry and Frances is the famous  Nancy Langhorne, Lady Astor, from her father Chiswell to his father John to Henry. (Sadly, we missed out on the wealth genes! LOL)

Now let’s look at some other family relationships/issues for a minute–and think about the warnings we’ve heard of cousins marrying and unlucky numbers, LOL Was Ned doomed to problems?  His parents were first cousins, oh dear.  He was one of 13 children!  Oh dear!  Then what…he married his own first cousin!  (“Lions Tigers and Bears, oh my!”)  What else could befall him… accused of murder…war…disease?  Wow!  Yes!  He went in service for the Civil War, and as a First Lieutenant for Company F, 28th Virginia Infantry, Confederate States of America, he fought at First Manasas, but died of Typhoid Fever on Christmas Day, 1861–three years after killing his “best friend”. He left behind a wife and two very small children!

How sad for two young men–and many more!

Above is a picture of a book by William E. Thompson on this “fatal affair”. 

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Hampden Sydney Colege–now and then.

 

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Genealogical Ties to Two Ampthill Plantations in Colonial America Highlights Intermarriages Among First Families

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(this post was first published in “Worldwide Genealogy – A Genealogical Collaboration, 30 Jan. 2018)

 

photo of Amphill Plantation in Chesterfield County, Virginia–from Wikipedia Commons

This is the story of two plantations in Virginia, USA, which were both called Ampthill Plantation at one time.  More so, it is about the discovery of these two homes both still standing in Virginia today, and realizing that the owners and families involved were all wealthy, influential, aristocratic First Families of Virginia and all related at least distantly to this author.  How exciting to.find information like this, facts that breathe life into old homes and broaden our understanding of our ancestors. One of these homes has become a Bed and Breakfast—I can hardly wait to stay in it and experience the very atmosphere of my ancestors! 
While working on my family tree on Ancestry, I had come across a picture of the first Ampthill Plantation built about 1730 in Colonial Virginia by our Great Uncle Henry Cary, 1675-1749.  When I posted the picture on my family tree on Ancestry, a knowledgeable woman named Margaret wrote me a kind note letting me know there were two Ampthill Estates! I was very surprised to learn that there was another Ampthill Plantation House in Virginia, and even more sothat it had also been owned by more of our own family’s ancestors 
 
The Cary’s Ampthill Plantation was originally located in part of the Henricus Settlement of Colonial Virginia, which became Chesterfield County in 1749.  The house was built by Henry Cary Jr. our eighth great –uncle, whose father, Henry Cary, Sr. our 8th Great -Grandfather, was an architect who designed many famous buildings in Colonial Virginia, including the Capital Building at Colonial Williamsburg.  The Cary Ampthill home was inhabited for many years by Henry Jr.’s son, our first cousin and a Revolutionary War hero, Col. Archibald Cary among others of the well-known Cary family.  Later the house was physically relocated into the city of Richmond, Virginia near Cary Street named for the family. As a child growing up in Richmond, Virginia, my mother worked as a realtor in an office on Cary Street.  We often saw this first Ampthill Estate home on our local travels. Unfortunately, at that time we did not know of our kinship.
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This is what Wikipedia says about the Cary Family’s Ampthill Plantation:  
“Ampthill Plantation pictured above) was located in the Virginia Colony in Chesterfield County on the south bank   of the James River about four miles south of the head of navigation at modern-day Richmond, Virginia.[1] Built by Henry Cary, Jr. about 1730, it was just upstream of Falling Creek.[2] It was later owned by Colonel Archibald Cary, who maintained a flour mill complex and iron forge at the nearby town of Warwick.  Mary Randolph was born there in 1762. 
In 1929, Ampthill House, the manor house of Ampthill Plantation, was dismantled, moved to a site on Cary Street Road in the West End of Richmond, and reassembled where it sits today. Although it is not open to the public, Ampthill House is a noteworthy local landmark, and is marked by a Virginia Historical Marker.[4] 
The former plantation property on the James River near Falling Creek is occupied by the Spruance Plant and related industrial complex of the DuPont Company.”—from Wikipedia:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ampthill_(Chesterfield_County,_Virginiahttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ampthill_(Chesterfield_County,_Virginia)
Ampthill Estate in Cartersville, Virginia–from Wikimedia Commons
The second Ampthill Plantation is located in the town of Cartersville, in Cumberland County, Virginia.  I call it the second Ampthill because it wasn’t named Ampthill until the early 1800’s, almost 100 years after the Cary’s Ampthill Estate. However, the land began to be developed about the same time as the first Ampthill—in the early 1700’s.
According to Wikipedia,“Ampthill is a plantation located in Cartersville, Cumberland County, VirginiaUnited States, roughly 45 minutes west of Richmond, and just over an hour south of Charlottesville. The property is listed on both the National Register of Historic Places and the Virginia Landmarks Register.
In 1714 Charles Fleming took on a land patent of 670 acres (2.7 km²) with an intent to cultivate it. The land, however, “lapsed,” and was later granted to Thomas Randolph in 1722. This area was later included in a tract made up of 2870 acres (11.6 km²), which later came to be known as “Clifton.” But it was this initial purchase of the 670 acres (2.7 km²) that would form “The Fork,” known for its position on the James and Willis Rivers. It would later become Ampthill. In 1724, Randolph sold the site to Robert “King” Carter, then the wealthiest landowner in Virginia.
In his will dated 22 August 1726, King Carter willed the 2870 acre (11.6 km²) tract to his then unborn grandson, with the stipulation that the child carry the Carter name. Some time later, Anne Carter and Major Benjamin Harrison of Berkeley Plantation, christened a son, Carter Henry, who later become the owner of the property known as “Clifton,” in Cumberland County, Virginia.
Carter Henry Harrison moved to Clifton upon graduation from law school. There he raised his family and wrote the Cumberland Resolutions, which were presented to the community from the steps of the Effingham Tavern. These resolutions were later incorporated into the Virginia Resolutions, which were the basis for the Declaration of Independence, written by Harrison’s nephew, Thomas Jefferson.
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Carter Henry Harrison died in 1793. In his will, Carter Henry willed Clifton to his son, Randolph, and The Fork to his son Robert. Robert sold The Fork to Shadrack Vaughan in 1804. Randolph later repurchased the property in 1815. The Fork was a clapboard structure of no more than three bedrooms. In 1815, the decision was made to add an addition to the existing manor. Randolph called upon his cousin, Thomas Jefferson, to design the brick addition that exists today. These plans exist today on file with the University of Virginia. The addition began its first phases of construction in 1835 and was completed in 1837. The two “houses” were separate for a number of years until a one-story passageway was built to connect the two. After the construction of the brick addition was completed the structure was renamed Ampthill.[3]
It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1972.
In 1998, the property was purchased by George Costen of Charlottesville. Beginning in 1999 and for a number of years that followed, Ampthill went under a major historic restoration.
Ampthill becamebed and breakfast and enjoys the prestige of being the only privately owned Jeffersonian property in Virginia. Her windows are the original glass. Ampthill exists today on 60 acres (240,000 m2) of the original 2870 acres (11.6 km²), is the home to 40 head of cattle and includes the manor house, four outbuildings and the barn, which dates to 1920, by far the youngest standing structure on the property.”  —https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ampthill_(Cumberland_County,_Virginia)
Wow, that is a lot of information, and it looks like the property moved through a lot of different families—however, let’s look a bit more closely through the eyes of a descendant, who is learning through genealogy!  Remember also, I have just learned of this estate, although it belonged to my ancestors, I never knew of it until recently.
Charles Fleming originally owned the land that became the second Ampthill Estate in 1714. The Wikipedia author states that Fleming’s grant lapsed and the land was then given to Thomas Randolph in 1722. However, I wonder if he realized  that Thomas Randolph’s wife was the daughter of Charles Fleming, Judith Churchill Fleming, 1689-1743!  She could not legally own property in Virginia, so I wonder if Charles Fleming willed it to his son-in-law perhaps. Thomas Randolph, 1683-1729 of Virgina, 2nd owner of the 2nd Ampthill, was my family’s ninth cousin. 
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–all family trees are the  personal work and property of Helen Y. Holshouser
 In 1726, only four years after receiving the land, Thomas Randolph sold it to the fifth Governor of Virginia, Robert “King” Carter, my family’s 9th Great Uncle!  Nothing like keeping it in the family! Thomas Randolph died in 1729, so he may have known he was not able to care for the land
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Robert “King” Carter, 1663-1732, Public Domain
Robert “King” Carter’s father, John Carter, was our 9th Great Grandfather. Robert “King” Carter willed the land to his grandson Carter Henry Harrison (our 2nd cousin), through Robert’s daughter Anne Carter (our 1st cousin) and her husband Benjamin Harrison IV, the grandparents of our 9th President of the US, William Henry Harrison! Carter Henry Harrison willed the land to his sons, Robert and Randolph Harrison.  Randolph Harrison (our 3rd cousin 7 times removed) ended up purchasing all of the property by 1815, where two clapboard houses stood, one  named the Clifton and the other The Fork. But wait– who was the wife of Carter Henry Harrison and the mother of Randolph Harrison?  None other than one Susannah Randolph, 1738-1779, our 10th cousin! Yes, she is related to us and is the niece of the original Thomas Randolph who owned the property on which the second Ampthill Estate was built!  Amazingly, she married a second time to Thomas Fleming, the grandson of the original owner of the 2nd Ampthill property, Charles Fleming!  Wow! In fact, Susannah Randolph’s father is Isham Randolph, who is the brother of Thomas Randolph, 1683-1729, the 2nd owner of the 2nd Ampthill. Isham and Thomas Randolph’s  parents were  William Randolph, 1651 of England who immigrated to Virginia, and his wife Mary Royall Isham.  
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That is not all of the important connections for this amazing family—and we haven’t even talked about their many roles in shaping the new country of the United States—but Isham Randolph b. 1685 and his wife Jane L. Rogers had eleven children including Susannah Randolph of course, and they also had her sister Jane Randolph, 1720, who married Peter Jefferson b.1708 and became the parents of our President, Thomas Jefferson, 1743-1826.  As you read above in the article from Wikipedia, Thomas Jefferson designed the second Ampthill Estate for his Uncle, Carter Henry Harrison who was also the Uncle of President William Henry Harrison!  Wow, simply amazing! As the article stated, the Ampthill Estate in Cartersville is the only privately-owned Thomas Jefferson designed home in Virginia and it is now a bed and breakfast! I can hardly wait to visit this home and walk and sleep where my ancestors slept and worked 200-300 years ago! 
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Thomas Jefferson in 1791 at 49 by Charles Willson Peale–Public Domain, Wikipedia 
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William Henry Harrison, Daguerreotype of an oil painting depicting William Henry Harrison, 9th President of the United States. Public Domain, Wikipedia
Albert Sands Southworth (American, 1811–1894) and Josiah Johnson Hawes (American, 1808–1901). Edited by: Fallschirmjäger –The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Accession number: 37.14.44. Search for “William Henry Harrison” on the museum’s site.
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Just to add other amazing discoveries (amazing to me) let’s look at the mother of Susannah Randolph b. 1738, for a minute. Married to Isham Randolph, her name was Jane Lilburnie Rogers, 1692-1760, and she was the 2nd great granddaughter of Thomas “The Pilgrim” Rogers, 1586-1621, who came to Plymouth Colony on the Mayflower! Not only is Thomas Rogers my own tenth great grandfather, he is my husband Max Holshouser’s eleventh great grandfather!  Yes, it makes us distant cousins! 
Other very interesting information about the Randolphs is that my sister Anne is married to Joseph Prince, who is also related to the same Randolph family of Virginia, making them distant cousins like Max and I are. What a small world native Virginians make! 
Through my DNA testing on ancestry, I have discovered other cousins also related to the Randolphs, Carters, Carys, Harrisons and Jeffersons.  One of the DNA cousins I met is Pam Maudsley Cooper, a dear cousin whom I have come to admire greatly, and who lives in Queensland, Australia!   I was born in Virginia, but have lived in the State of North Carolina in America since 1980. Thanks to the internet, Pam and I can work together often on the genealogy we both enjoy and enhance our cousinship! Different continents, but we share13th great grandparents in William Carter, 1475-1521 and his wife Alice Croxton, 1478-1525 of England. Again, I say totally amazing! 
Then there is this information tying the families of the two Ampthill Estates together:  the 3rd owner of the 2nd Ampthill in Cartersville, Virginia was Robert King Carter, fifth Gov. Of Virginia and our ninth great- Uncle, who received the land in 1726He willed the land to his daughter Anne Carter Harrison’s son Carter Henry Harrison—although it was not called Ampthill until 1835.  MeanwhileHenry Cary Jr. built the first Ampthill Plantation in Chesterfield County, Virginia about 1730. Henry Cary Jr.’s sister, Anne Cary, my 7th great grandmother, was married to Maurice Langhorne,whose mother, Anne Cary’smother-in-law, was none other than Rebecca Carter, our eighth great grandmother, and a member of the same Carter family of Colonial Virginia.  Even closer perhaps, Colonel Archibald Cary of Ampthill in Chesterfield County, married Mary Randolph, 1722-1781.  She belongs to this very same famous Randolph family
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If all of these intermarriages make you dizzy, I surely understand. However, as you get to know the individuals and the immense contributions they made to the founding of America, I imagine you will admire them as I do. There is a book written by Robert K. Headley, Jr. titled Married Well and Often, Marriages of the Northern Neck of Virginia, 1649-1800. While it is a book of valuable marriage records, the title always makes me smile especially when I read of the many inter-family marriages that were common in the colonial days of Virginia.  
 
I do love family history!  Until next time, I am wishing you the very best,  Helen Holshouser 

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Map of the Homes of Kearse Families in Richmond, Virginia Through the Years.

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My second great- grandfather on my mother’s side was Robert E. Kearse, born in 1832 in Glanquin, County Clare Ireland. When he was only 18, he came to America with his brother Timothy who settled in Massachusetts and his brother John who made his way to Chicago then to California. Robert came to Richmond, Virginia where another brother, James, older by only two years, had settled with their mother Ann O’Keefe Kearse, their Dad was deceased.  Also present in Richmond were other cousins, who made for a great family gathering! Although Robert was only 18 when he arrived in 1850 on the ship Northumberland from Ireland, by 1855 he was married to Margaret Hannan and they had their first child Thomas born in 1855.  By April 1861, the Civil War had started and he and his brother James both joined the Confederate forces to defend their adopted city which was the Capital of the Confederacy! While he was fighting,  1861-1865, or standing guard of the city and of Union prisoners, he had three more children.  Robert Jr. in 1861, Mary in 1863, and John in 1864. He had already had James Henry in 1857, then had five more after the war, for a total of ten new Kearse family members in America!  We notice that besides having a Robert Jr., Robert also named three sons after other brothers, one of whom was named after his father as well.  Timothy–there must be a million Timothy, Thadeus, Thady or Tim Kearse persons in this family, the other million are named James!  We know that on the ship with Robert were his brothers John and Timothy, and in Richmond was James as well.  DNA testing has connected us to all of the families I believe.  In fact, one of the newest cousins I have met through our DNA match is Bob  of Ireland who now lives in England.  He is a very knowledgeable source for Kearse history.  He and I are currently trying to catalog all of the Timothys in our extended Kearse family! This ought to be fun!

By the way, Kearse is spelled in many different ways by many different families who are related to each other.  We have Kearse, Kierce, Kierse, Kerse, Kears, and Kersey at least!  They are all the same family!  DNA and history are what counts, so interesting!

As I’ve thought of the Kearse family so much this week, I began to think about the early immigrants to America, who came here in response to the famine in Ireland, which forced so many Irish to seek sustenance elsewhere. I began to think of the lives of those who came to Richmond and elsewhere, and wanted to know more, and share more, of what they did and experienced, where they lived.  That motivated me to create this article, blog post, on our Kearse family regarding where they had lived and what they had done with their lives.  I hope this map will help me share just a bit of that information. By the way, you might notice if you look in the list of posts for this blog, I believe I have already written like 18 posts about the Kearse family, so if you enjoy this one, you might enjoy reading about more of the personalities.  I am so appreciative of my sister and brothers’ help in locating these places on the map and sharing memories.  You should be able to click on the map below and make it larger for easier reading.

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2019-01-25 (15)Two people in blue=731 West Marshall Street, home of Timothy and Anne Donolan Kearse and their children. Mary Jane Kearse, 1858-1875; Isadore Joseph Kearse 1860; James J Kersey 1862; Annie C. Kearse 1867; Hannah J Kearse, 1870; Josephine August Kearse 1873-1917.  

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2019-01-25 (16)2019-01-25 (16)2019-01-25 (20) Two houses beside each other represent 368 and 369 Louisiana Street where brothers James (1830-1890) and Robert (1832-1895) Kearse lived side by side for many years.  They owned a grocery store and adjacent bakery which was located on the same street.   

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2019-01-25 (53) The purple balloon located near the houses above shows the location on Orleans Street of a grocery store also owned by my 2nd great grandfather, Robert Kears. (1832-1895). 

2019-01-25 (42)This lovely glass of wine marks “Kearse Hall” also on Orleans Street at 506 Orleans in the Rocket’s Landing area of Richmond, Va. This was owned and operated by Timothy Kearse, a cousin of Robert and James. It used to be that some people built “Halls” that other people could rent to hold special occasions like weddings and other celebrations.  I do not know but suspect that is what this building was used for. 

You might notice that the families stayed close together for home and work, but after the Civil War, they slowly moved westward both north and south of the James River. 

2019-01-25 (9)The red balloon marks the residence at 2205 East Main Street where Timothy Kearse lived.  It appears to be the same Timothy Kearse who married Anne Donolan because he started an… 

2019-01-25 (19)Irish Pub next door at 2207 East Main Street about 1890. His son Isadore Kearse, only 18, helped manage the bar.  

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2019-01-25 (47)The checkmark marks the address 2223 East Main Street where my grandfather Thomas Philip Kearse, 1883-1939, lived with his father James Henry Kearse,1857-1921, and his mother Mary Catherine Botto when he was young through his teenage years. His mother Mary Botto Kearse and only surviving sister, Marie lived there with them, as they did when they moved to …

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2019-01-25 (13)their long-lived-in home at 2612 E. Grace Street. My own mother was born in 1918 at this home on E. Grace Street, as were 5 of her 6 siblings.  They cared for their aging, widowed grandfather James Henry Kearse until he died in 1921. James actually left the house to his son, but Tom’s wife Kate would not hear of it. She felt it would be easier for them to move on than for Marie with her music school.  Strong-willed, Kate at 8 months pregnant, moved with six children already!  Amazing!  Thank you, cousin Tyler Buck, for giving me the true story. 

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2019-01-25 (14)You might notice that the home on E. Grace Street is very close to St. Patrick’s Catholic Church on 25th Street, marked by the lovely cross. That was my Mother’s family’s home church for years and she went to the affiliated school as well as did her siblings. 

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2019-01-25 (11)1923:  When my Grandfather Thomas, his wife Kate Steptoe Houchins (whose mother was of the prominent Langhorne family) and their six, soon seven children left E. Grace Street, they moved for a few years into a house they built themselves planning to rent it out one day.  They built it as a duplex, yet lived in the whole structure, and it was lovely inside and out. The smiley face marks the address at 3431 Floyd Avenue. Kate was a nurse, and Thomas was a police officer, after starting out as a driver for the Richmond Police Department where his father James was a popular Sergeant.  

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2019-01-25 (43)By 1930 Tom and Kate and their six daughters were living at 4024 Forest Hill Avenue, south of the James River for the first time. Moving to the south side of Richmond, made that area home turf for me and my siblings as we were born nearby. Early on it seemed that my grandparents were living the idyllic life.  The house was a large, three-story white frame house with a huge veranda out front.  It faced a beautiful city park where we played on many a day! They employed a cook, housekeepers, and other household helpers.  They owned a yacht and spent many sunny days on the James River or beyond having many adventures. We assume the money for their lifestyle came from the Langhorne family legacy.  Then tragedy struck not once, but twice.  Their only son and brother, Thomas Philip Kearse Jr. called “Bucky” drowned in the James River while sailing a dingy away from the yacht. In 1930, eight years after he drowned, their mother Kate was shot in the head and severely brain damaged, but not killed. She was shot by a patient in a coma who she was caring for, in their private home.  The patient wakened suddenly, thought Kate was an enemy from the war, and grabbed a rifle hanging on his wall that no one knew was loaded and shot my grandmother–then he collapsed and died!  Grandmother Kate lived but was never able to care for her family like she had been able to before.   She had six daughters–ages 7 to 17.  So much confusion and turmoil followed, it colored all of the girls’ perceptions and as a unit, they all left the Catholic church as teens. All of the sisters were intelligent and talented, however, and four of the six went on to college, surprising in the late 1930s, especially in the South.  All the girls pursued professions as well, teachers, real estate brokers, social workers, writers, and so forth.  All were involved in their protestant churches of choice, and all married- four have children. Two of the sisters eventually moved to California– one to North Carolina and one to Gloucester Point in Eastern Virginia. Julia and my mother Margaret, stayed in Richmond, as did Catherine for a few years.  In the picture below, l to r, are Katherine, Julia, Evie, Janey Bell, Nancy, and Margaret.  Unfortunately, we do not have a picture of their house as it was replaced by apartments. But I can give you a look at their beautiful view of Forest Hill Park, just across the street from their house.   We loved to hike down to the lake as shown, but one of our favorite things to do, was to go sledding down the lovely hills of the park—which put us directly in front of the elegant old house where my Mom and her sisters had lived.  

kerse sisters 4

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2019-01-25 (10)Margaret my mother married Cecil H. Youngblood and after the war, WWII, they moved into a lovely stone house at 7524 Rockfalls Drive which was located about twenty minutes from our mother’s home on Forest Hill Avenue, but was not part of the city until it was annexed about 1968, I believe. It was very rural when I was a child, and very close to the James River.  The seven of us, Mom, Dad, his mother our grandmother, and Anne, Cecil, Fulton and I lived and went to school and church on the south side of the river.  But mother worked every day north of the river.  Our Aunt Julia who we called Jucky lived in the West End of Richmond, also “across” the river with her husband and three children, Claudia, Johnnie, and Edward Lee.  For a while, Mom’s sister Katherine also lived in the west end on Arlie Street with her husband Roger, and children Roger IV and Tyler.  Driving across bridges was part of our busy lives in the city of Richmond, Virginia. 

rockfalls drive, 7524, originally 606 club drive, youngblood house where helen and sibs grew up in richmond,virginia

About a mile down the street from our stone house, my sister Anne and her husband Joe made their home at 7009 Riverside Drive. Even though it is hard to see, they had a lovely, gorgeous porch that ran across the front of their villa- like house. 

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2019-01-25 (49)The green pin marks the church we attended pretty much every Sunday all of my life from birth until I left Richmond for North Carolina at the age of 30. Westover Hills United Methodist Chruch was our home church where Max and I were married, where Dad ushered, and where Mom taught Sunday School to other women for such a long time, that when she died in 1980, they installed a stained- glass window in her Sunday School class in her honor!  My siblings and I led choirs, lead youth groups even as youths themselves. We all loved that church and the people there had a huge impact on our lives.  

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2019-01-25 (7)Max and I were married in 1971, and we soon lived in an old Victorian house where our first child was born in 1974. The house was located as this red pin indicates in the Woodland Heights neighborhood, very close to where my mother had lived on Forest Hill Avenue!  Even though there were many homes involved, you can see from the map that the extended Kearse family generally stayed fairly close together.  

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2019-01-25 (51)Even in death, many of the original Kearse family members are buried at Mt. Calvary Cemetery in Richmond, Virginia. It is a beautiful, restful place of peace.

mt calvalry cemetery, richmond, virginia

 

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Scottish Ancestors and Living Cousins

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Having my DNA done on Ancestry several years ago, led to a chapter of my life’s journey I could never have imagined. While researching my family’s genealogy, I began meeting other researchers, some of whom also happened to be related to me biologically –proven through DNA.  We had to figure out just exactly how we were related, however!  That was the adventure.  Soon it became obvious that we needed a place where we could talk to each other easily, share discoveries, ideas, and get to know each other. That’s where social media, especially Facebook, came to be so valuable. On Facebook, we could form a group, in this case, people interested in Hogg/Hogue/Hogge research especially, and most of us were related to each other., and soon became friends.  On Facebook, it didn’t matter if we were from Europe or America, we could talk, share, and compare discoveries easily. Across America also, from New York to Virginia to California, and Wisconsin to Florida!  What a wonderful experience.  

Lately, I have been studying the Hogg DNA Project which has been going on for about ten years I think.  The study was directed and articles authored by Henry Dwight Hogge, Ph.D.  Enough people have joined the study, that some conclusions have been made and published.  You can access the data that I draw from for this post at these links: “Hogg DNA Project – Project Results”   Another well-organized site by Henry Dwight Hogge, Ph.D., and one full of great family information and links, is:  “Hogg DNA Project A List of Hogg Lines”

wanted to see if I could organize our family group on Facebook, according to the latest developments in the Hogg DNA Project.  I understand that Dwight has identified at least twenty different DNA groups of Hogg descendants in the United States! Wow! Hogg was a popular name in Scotland!  Dwight says that the name Hogg originally described a yearling sheep, so when surnames began and were generally based on vocation or location, many sheepherders took the name Hogg. They just adopted the name, and now, some 500 years later, we are trying to figure out who is related to whom! What a great adventure!  

One of our group members, a cousin from Wisconsin, Ron Hogue, shared another definition that I like and have found true for the family. 

Our Hogue Family Facebook group currently has 62 members. We are always open for new cousins. Some in the group are not related to us, but “friends” of the family, like Douglas Moncrieff, a professional genealogist from Scotland who has helped guide our research tremendously.  

Most of the members of our group belong to the Hogg DNA Project 
Group I1, cluster 1.  This group connects nine family groups whose DNA show that they share a common ancestor. A few folks in our Facebook group are related to each other, but by DNA not actually related to the I1 groups. By the way, that is not 11 (eleven), that is the letter I, like in Ireland, and the number one,”1″. Hard to tell if you are not familiar with the rankings. This is how I believe our group is organized.  

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 I. These nine different family lines have matching DNA and all belong to the Hogg DNA Project I1 cluster 1 – according to Henry Dwight Hogge, Ph.D., Sept. 2017: 

   1. MD1765a descendants of Alexander Ogg of Maryland, b.ca.1745 

—-Line including Iris Elizabeth Ogg first wife of George Combs
      who married as his     2nd wife Helen Marie Youngblood who descends from linePA1755a and is this author’s paternal Aunt. 

 2. NH1703a descendants of William W. Church b.1855 Montpelier VT 

—-Line including our members Leona and Joann  

 3. GA1770a descendants of James Hogg Sr. of Savannah GA b.1740 

—-Line includes our members: Betty , Jerry Carla  

 4. PA1754a descendants of Robert Hogg b.1721, Southern Scotland 

—-Line including our member Carol. 

5. PA1755a descendants of Robert Hogg b.1725, Scotland d.1747, PA 

—–includes most members of our family group including:  

Ali Holshouser Orcutt, sister of Annie Holshouser, both daughters of Helen Youngblood Holshouser. 

Alice Youngblood, wife of Cecil Hogue Youngblood. Brother of Fulton Youngblood, and Helen Youngblood Holshouser 

Allison, Donna’s daughter 

Barry, Bev, Beverly 

Bonnie – adult children Billy, Kristin, and Jennifer. Tammy  

Charles, Cheryl, Cyndi 

Dee, Donna 

Ellie  

James, brother of Wynn; Jennifer, Ron S’s daughter; Jessica, Joanne 

Lois  

Mae, Marcia, Maria, Michelle 

Rebecca, Robert, Ron H., Ron S. 

Sherry, Stephanie, Sue B., Sue N., Suzy N. 

Vickie, and her 3 adult children Tracy, Tabitha, and Travis, and four adult grandchildren– Courtney, Casey, Scottie, and Kimberley  are members.  

6. PA1825a descendants of James Hogue b.1825, Pennsylvania-no members in our group yet.  
7. RI1690a descendants of John Hogg b.1690 RI-no members. 
8. NI1777a descendants of James Hogg of Northern Ireland b.ca.1777–no members. 
9. IL1825a descendants of John Hogg, d.1825, Vermilion Co. IL—no members. 

It is interesting to note, that in the book, The Genealogy of the Jackson Family, by Hugh Parks Jackson, Hugh Hogue Thompson, and James R. Jackson, 1890, it is stated that the first immigrant in DNA line PA1755, Robert Hogg, b. 1725 in Ayrshire, Scotland, died 1747 in Pennsylvania, was one of nine brothers!  Is it a coincidence that nine different but related families form this one DNA group, I1 cluster1? This is one area needing more research.  

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II. A close match to this group is a DNA group called   I1 cluster 2.  As I understand it, cluster1 and 2 probably share a common ancestor, but maybe 1000 or 2000 years ago! It includes the lines:

    1.  IR1755, Descendants of Samuel Hogg, b. 1755, d. bef. 1802, Ireland.  Includes our Facebook Group Member Dory 

    2.  IR1764, Descendants of the Widow Elizabeth Hogg, b.ca. 1764 County Donegal, Ireland, died in Slippery Rock, Pennsylvania.  

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III. One of the most well-known Hogg lines is SL1580. 

    1. SL1580 and NJ1682 include “descendants of John Hoge b.ca.1580, Musselburgh, Berwickshire, Scotland — John Hoge was the ancestor of William Hoge, b.1660, Musselburgh, Berwickshire, Scotland, who migrated to America in 1682 on the ship Caledonia, arriving in Perth Amboy NJ, marrying Barbara Hume, d.1745, in Frederick Co. VA. We refer to the descendants of William and Barbara by the code NJ1682.” Henry Dwight Hogge, PhD. 

In our Facebook group, we have several members whose DNA matches this group of Hoggs:  Amanda, JoAnn, and Lee Hogg Williams.  

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IV.   Perhaps the most famous Hogg line of all Hogg lines is SL1640.  

    1.  line SL1640 includes ”  descendants of Walter Hogg of Prestonpans, East Lothian, Scotland, b.ca.1640 — Walter Hogg was the ancestor of many Selkirkshire and Roxburghshire Hoggs, including James Hogg, The Ettrick Shepherd, (a famous poet). The lines previously identified as SL1698 and SL1753 have been combined into this line.” –Henry Dwight Hogge, PhD  

   In our Facebook group, we have two members from this famous DNA group, Helen B. and Nancy. 

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 V.   Some of the earliest Hogg family members came to Colonial Virginia, and have records recorded in the Virginia Colony as early as 1657. In the Hogg DNA Project, this group is identified as:  

   1.  line VA1657:  “descendants of John Hogg of New Kent Co. VA — John Hogg came to Virginia in 1657 as headright to Capt. Leonard Chamberlain (C&P Vol. 1, p. 346, 451). He settled in New Kent Co. As a result of the DNA study, we have learned that line NC1720, descendants of Gideon Hogg of Caswell Co. NC, and line VA1790, descendants of Sampson Hogg of Virginia and Indiana, are part of this line. Consequently, we have merged those trees into this tree.” –Henry Dwight Hogge, PhD 

In our Facebook group, our own Gary H. is a descendant of this group. 

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 VI. A second but unrelated Hogg family in early Virginia was:  

1. line VA1658: descendants of William Hogg (Hoges) of York Co. VA — William Hoges is first mentioned in the records in York County in 1658. (By DNA this line is NOT related to line VA1657-“descendants of John Hogg of New Kent Co. VA — John Hogg came to Virginia in 1657 as headright to Capt. Leonard Chamberlain (C&P Vol. 1, p. 346, 451). He settled in New Kent Co. As a result of the DNA study, we have learned that line NC1720, descendants of Gideon Hogg of Caswell Co. NC, and line VA1790, descendants of Sampson Hogg of Virginia and Indiana, are part of this line.” –Henry Dwight Hogge, PhD. 

This line, VA 1658, includes my own cousins, children of my mother’s sister. My main Hogue line is through my father.  My mother’s sister married a man named W. R. Buck, and his mother’s line shares this DNA line as well.  Of course, I am only related to my first cousins, not their father’s line of ancestors. Still, it is an interesting connection. 

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VI.   Hogg DNA Line VA1745  

      1.  descendants of James Hogg of Edinburgh Scotland — “The traditional story is that James Hogg of Scotland, b.1680, was the father of James Hogg, Thomas Hogg, and Capt. Peter Hogg who came to Virginia in 1745. Capt. Peter Hogg served with Washington in the French and Indian War. The records show that Capt. Peter Hogg considered Thomas Hogg Sr. to be his brother, but DNA from descendants of Capt. Peter Hogg does not match DNA from descendants of Thomas Hogg Sr. We presume that Thomas Hogg Sr. was a half-brother (with different fathers) of Capt. Peter Hogg and James Hogg.”– Henry Dwight Hogge, PhD 

This line includes our treasured group member, Dee Horn.  

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Isn’t it amazing!  Due to the popularity of DNA testing in genealogy; the hard work of scientists like Henry Dwight Hogg, PhD, in organizing and completing DNA studies; and the ease of meeting people as never before by internet programs like Facebook, Ancestry, and many more sites, we are able to meet cousins all over the world, and trace our ancestry back many centuries.  The Scottish people must be amazing, because the people in our Facebook group, all descendants of Scots, are amazing—what a joy and a gift to know them!  

Until we meet again, Helen Youngblood Holshouser

“Sharing Love with Family, Hoggs, and Kisses” 

by artist and family member Lee Hogg Williams

– available as a puzzle or a dry erase board along with other fun items 

at:    https://www.zazzle.com/hoggs_kisses_dry_erase_board-256007096373918872

This blog post was first published on the Blog Worldwide Genealogy, A Genealogical Collaboration, on September 29, 2017, by Helen Y. Holshouser

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