Heart of a Southern Woman

A snapshot of life one blog post at a time.

Childhood Recollections of Our Goat Billy– as told to this author by her Cousin Ron Hogue on his 80th Birthday!

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Ron Hogue

Ron and I met on Ancestry–we have never met in person!  We are fourth cousins through my father’s mother’s line!  (Let me hear you say that five times!) Our mutual interest in genealogy and family history, plus our DNA match sealed the deal, leading to our great friendship! Yesterday, Ron turned 80 years old–or maybe that was 8, a mere child, according to him!  LOL  

We talked via video chatting on Facebook, we are so tech savvy!  LOL  After the “congratulations”, we talked about his sadness over the loss just a few months ago of his beloved wife  Dorie Hogue. Turning eighty didn’t feel as great without his best friend of 62 years!

However, as we talked, Ron shared a phone conversation he’d had earlier in the day with his sister Sue. Ron lives in Wisconsin, Sue is  in Minnesota, and I am in North Carolina!  They had reminisced about their childhood, in a rural area just outside of Park Falls, Wisconsin.  Many of the stories brought our laughter bubbling up from the depths of our souls!

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https://kids.spcaeducation.org.nz/animal-care/goats/freedom-from-pain-injury-or-disease/

We were talking about pets, as he just got a new kitty for his birthday. He recalled that when he was a boy, his family had chickens, dogs, cats, and his especially beloved Billy Goat!  He recalled  tussles with the rooster pecking at him and other family members.  He could clearly describe the fascinating hens  with their red feathers and green feather topknots! But Billy—was his love, and his nemesis!  LOL

 

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Stubborn Goat

Ron recalled that it was his job to put the free-ranging goat back into his cage every night!  Of course, the goat wanted no part of leaving his beloved freedom, so he turned into a stubborn Donkey!  Twelve year-old Ron could be seen wrestling with the goat–determined to “be the boss”, LOL–as he tugged the goat while the goat just dug his front legs in deeper and lowered his head, but never charged our Ron!  LOL

The story I loved however, was when Ron told me that he remembered his grandmother spoiling Billy the Goat as if he were her baby.  Billy would come to a back hall door of the farm house in which they lived.  He’d bleat until Grandma would come to the door to say  “Good Mornin’ Billy!”  Then she would step back, swing the door wide, and Billy would trot right into the house–head held high and a big smile on his face–trotting right through other rooms until he reached the kitchen!  There he stood right in front of the cabinet holding the bread box, and began to bleat loudly again!  Grandma would say “Okay, okay, its coming Billy, be patient!”  LOL  Then she would open the bread box and take out one slice of bread–giving it to the hungry, expectant goat!  Nodding his head in thanks, Billy clamped the bread tight in his mouth, turned, and trotted right back out the back door!  Once outside, he gobbled his tasty morsel and bleated his thanks again as he ran off to play with the other animals!

 

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Wow!  Can’t you see it, can’t you feel the charm, the love, the sense of family and community! What a story! Thanks so much for sharing it with me cousin Ron Hogue!  What a treasure–both you and the story! So glad we both love family and genealogy! 

 

 

 

 

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Family Pictures Found–Unidentified–Part 3

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Youngblood sibs in snow, Gwendolyn, Cecil, Helen, unknown and Fulton

You might want to read the last two posts before reading this one–it might make more sense if you do.   You can find part one here, and part two here.

We are discussing pictures found recently by this author Helen’s sister in Richmond,Virginia. There were about fifty pictures of family members found in a small album never seen by any of the living siblings of this family, all in our  60’s and 70’s now. Only two of the fifty pictures were identified, but thanks to that, and to  other family pictures allowing us to identify  some others, we decided that more than likely, these were pictures that belonged to our Father’s family–his Dad’s German Youngblood family,and his mother’s Scotish Hogue family.

Since I am the active amateur genealogist of the family and family historian, who is also most in touch with other family members, cousins, and DNA matches, through social media groups, etc., I eagerly took pictures of the newfound 100 year-old photographs to work on trying to identify as many as possible.

Who are the most likely family members in these pictures? For that answer, I went to our family tree.  Even  though I include all the parents and siblings, I truly believe most of these pictures come from the family of Edwin Spear Youngblood and his wife Helen Blanche Hogue, which includes my father.

 

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The family of  Robert Fulton Hogue, Sr. b. 1850, with his children and grandchildren.  One of those children is my father’s mother i–Helen Blanche Hogue, child III.

 

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The family of Lewis Jacob Youngblood with his siblings, his children and grandchildren.  My father’s family is shown with  his father Edwin Spear Youngblood as child  #5.

 

With that in mind, I wonder if Edwin Spear Youngblood and /or his wife, Helen Blanch Hogue  Youngblood, my paternal grandparents, are in any of these found pictures!  Two of my cousins wrote to me yesterday to identify Helen B.  –and look–these are known portraits of them that I have on my own living room wall.

 

 

What happens if I compare these to some of the found pictures on the family search compare-a-face site? Yes!  Helen is a match!  

 

Helen Blanche Hogue Youngblood known on left, and unknown

 

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unknown picture to identify, now seen as Helen Blanche Hogue-Youngblood

Here below, is an older, known picture of my paternal grandmother, Helen Blanche Hogue Youngblood that I took myself when I was about age 15! She would have been 84. How does it compare to  the picture of her younger self above?  Wow!  95%! Wow!

 

 

Below is one of the unidentified pictures of a young man–it looks a bit to me like it could be Edwin, could it be?  I’m not at all sure, but look,family search compare-a-face says it is more than likely! What do you think?

 

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Edwin Sear YOungblood compared with younger self maybe

 

Here’s another unknown single young man, is this Edwin Spear also?  

 

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This is so very interesting!  I hope a lot of relatives will stop by to comment and give advice, on ancestry, Facebook, or where ever you find me!  Thanks and happy ancestor hunting!

PS, I think there might have to be one more post—  part 4, and I promise to stop then!  LOL Well…maybe. 

 

 

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Family Pictures Found, Part 2–Who Are They? Ideas for Figuring That Out

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This is a continuation of the last post, entitled Family Pictures Found–Unidentified! You can read it here– Family Pictures Found–Unidentified!  

Since getting that treasure trove of unidentified family pictures, I learned of a new site that might help us with that on familysearch.., specifically at this link: Compare-a-face

You can do several very interesting things at this site! I believe it is designed to compare a picture of you, yourself to your ancestors, to see who you look like.  However, in this case, I wanted to compare some of the unknown family members to known family pictures and see if I could find matches! It worked, or at least gave us clues!  I do want to tell you, whenever you want to  make someone else, other than yourself, the face to be compared to–you must start a new trial.  That means leave the site, then sign back in, and upload a different person from yourself to compare with other pictures.  Now, that may seem complicated, but family search has great instructions on their site, and  you will have no trouble following them!

As I was beginning to learn to use this site, I first used pictures of people whose identity I knew. Let me show you some examples. It was gratifying to see high scores when I compared  known people when they were young and older.  The comparisons are scored in similarity on a 100% (meaning identical) scale.  The best scores I found were like 91% and similarly.  I did find some matches, people I knew, where they were only matched at about 60%.   I learned that those matching in the 20’s and 30%’s were probably NOT matches. Others, higher, warranted more investigation. Let me show you some examples:

The program recognized me– on my wedding day, aged 22, compared to my current 70 year-old self!  Amazing!

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My Mom– Margaret Steptoe Kearse Youngblood, in 1941 and in 1980:

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My Dad:  Cecil Hogue Youngblood, Sr. in 1941 and 1988:

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So, how does this help us identify our unidentified pictures?  Well look!  It’s exciting! The drawback of course, is you have to have a KNOWN photograph of a person in order to compare them with an unknown picture and see if you get a match.  So I did what I could!

The first picture below  is a known picture of my Father’s sister, my Aunt Helen Marie Youngblood  (1907-1978) who married first Edward Riddick Webb, and second George Frederick Combs. In the recent treasure trove of pictures my sister found, two were identified, the second one below is one of those, and was identified as this same woman– my Aunt Helen Marie Youngblood, in about 1922 which would make her about 15 years old when standing with her horse on the family farm in  Colonial Heights, Virginia.

Helen Marie Youngblood, abt. 18 years old    Helen Marie Youngblood

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This picture on the right was one of the unidentified.  Because of the snow, the website Compare- a -Face will not use this photo.  However, if you compare it to the one with Aunt Helen Marie Youngblood (1907-1978) and her horse above, it seems like a definite match to me!  What do you think?   Then look below where the website compared two known pictures of Helen Marie Youngblood (1907-1978) and they say yes,they are a match! 

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Now look, this helped me find the identify of some of the unknown pictures! I started by uploading to the familysearch, Compare- a -Face site a known picture of Aunt Helen,.  Next I compared at least two other pictures from the album of unidentified pictures, ones that a cousin guessed might be her. Yes!

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I wondered if this pic above  might be my Aunts Gwendolyn (l) and Helen (r) Youngblood, sisters of my father.

My cousin Tracy Pender told me that she believed the woman in the front row of this picture below, third from the left, was also my Aunt Helen Marie Youngblood–her Great-Grandmother. I could see the family resemblance. Just look at the original picture, then the comparison with a known picture of Helen Marie Youngblood!  They match at 83%–it must be her!

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Do you see the picture above of two ladies in coats and hats–the one I labeled as possibly being my Aunts–sisters–Gwendolyn and Helen Youngblood?  Well, from my experience, a 72% match between a known picture of my Aunt Helen and the shorter lady, proves that she is indeed my Aunt Helen!

My Aunt Gwendolyn was always tall and slim.  I guessed that was her with her sister Helen in the picture of the ladies in coats and hats.  I found a couple of pictures that I knew were Aunt Gwendolyn and used those to compare.  Here are two KNOWN pictures of Gwendolyn compared: (only 59%?)

Gwendolyn Youngblood Tucker young and older

 

Now below is one known picture of Aunt Gwendolyn compared to the tall, slim woman in the coat and hat with  who we decided was her sister Helen Marie Youngblood: (only 34%!  That’s crazy!  I can’t imagine who else this might be!)

 

Gwendolyn to young Gwendolyn

 

And …below is the same known picture of Aunt Gwendolyn Youngblood Tucker compared to a different one of the unknown pictures that several of us thought surely must be Aunt Gwendolyn when she was young–she was so attractive, tall ,slim and fun!  But no–the Compare a – Face says known Aunt Gwendolyn and this pretty lady are only a 26% match!  Below that is the two unknown, but guessed Aunt Gwendolyn pictures compare at 91% –so they are the same person for sure, but perhaps not Aunt Gwendolyn!   Wow!  

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Unknown picture, thought to be Blanche Gwendolyn Youngblood (1915-2004)

 

 

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With all these comparisons, what conclusions can we safely draw? 

I believe that so far, considering the pictures examined in this one blog post, the only positive conclusion we can draw is that the shorter lady on the right in this unidentified picture of the tow  women in coats and hats, is certainly Helen Marie Youngblood Webb Combs! This is a lot of work!  More in the next blog post.

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Family Pictures Found–Unidentified!

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Youngblood sibs in snow, Gwendolyn, Cecil, Helen, unknown and Fulton

A recently discovered family picture with  no one identified. We are working to identify  these people!

Family pictures and portraits–don’t you love them!?  A couple weeks ago, my sister found a small album, about 3″ x 5″, full of old family pictures! The picture above is one of those pictures!  I love that picture, but who are those folks?!    What a treasure!  There were maybe 50 pictures–but only two were actually labeled as to who was in the picture!  Now my sister and I are in our 70’s—born in the 1940’s, as was my older brother.  Our younger brother was not born until 1955.  These pictures look like they were mostly taken in the early 1920’s!  Some people looked familiar, but we are just guessing! A treasure and a puzzle!

Our Mom died in 1980, Dad in 1988.  After Dad died we cleared out the house that had been ours for 60 years, and sold it. Items were divided among several family members, including pictures.  We thought we had accounted for them all.  My sister found this little album of pictures in a box of papers, that we may never have gone through except in a cursory manner. We were shocked!  It may have even been my grandmother’s, my paternal grandmother lived with us until she died when I was about 15, in 1964. Her name was Helen Blanche Hogue, and she had married my paternal grandfather, Edwin Spear Youngblood–I was lucky enough to inherit portraits of both of them, my namesakes. Looking through the pictures, my brother Cecil thought he recognized several, and with the two labeled, we realized they were probably all  either Hogue or Youngblood family members. All I had to do was look at who was living in the 1920’s–ha!–and maybe find the matches!

 

The two pictures that were labeled on the back, are shown below.  The first is my Great Grandfather Robert Fulton Hogue, with his son, Robert Fulton Hogue Jr. b. 1921–called “Bobby”–that is what it says on the back of the picture;   (and yes, he was 70 years old when he fathered Bobby)  Since the child in the  picture was born in 1921, we figure it must be about 1922 when that picture was taken–his father died in 1924.

Robert Fulton Hogue, 1850-1924 with son Robert Fulton Hogue, Jr, called Bobby, 1921-child of third wife, Maude Hooten

Robert Fulton Hogue, 1850-1924, ahown age 71 with 2 year-old son Bobby Jr.

 

Below is the other picture that was labeled.  It says this picture is of my father’s sister, Helen Marie Youngblood, 1907-1978,  who married first  Edward Riddick Webb, and second George Combs. She is pictured below with her horse.  Robert Fulton Hogue is her maternal grandfather. It looks like this picture could have been taken also in 1922, like the other, as she would be 15, about  how she looks.

Helen Marie Youngblood

 

Here are some of the others, and I do not yet know who they are! They are not in any particular order! I am working on it!

 

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 Here are eleven unidentified pictures of family members!  Now what should we do? And there are many more!  Really great pictures!  I think I will lay them all out here this time, in hopes that someone  might just see them and identify them!  In the next couple of posts, I will begin to work on them myself and see if  you agree! Come back, I need your help! I have also found a photo-comparison site that you  and I might find useful!

 

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In the next post I’ll share some ways that we have begun to identify some of these folks.  If anyone reading this blog thinks they can identify any of these people, please let me know! Helen

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Uncle Langhorne killed cousin Charles Edie? Shock!

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                        langhjorne-and-edie-murder-at-hampden-sydney

There was a murder–162 years ago– January 27, 1857, at a private, all- male college in Virginia– Hampden Sydney College.   I had never heard of the event until three days ago.  I traveled to my sister’s home, in Richmond, Virginia–er husband and son attended Hampden Suydney.  She showed me an alumni magazine with this story featured on  the cover!  Since the man who was accused of murder was one Edward “Ned” Alexander Langhorne, we were all interested in discovering whether or not he was related to us. (the Langhorne family is on my mother’s side of the family.)

When I got home, I researched  him with the help of my daughter Annie Holshouser.  What a surprise to learn that  he was a fairly close family member–he was my 3rd great Uncle, actually a half- Uncle on my mother’s side of the family. . Sadly, the other Hampden Sydney student he murdered was his best friend!  How tragic, they were only 18, both lives ruined!  The student who died was named Charles Taylor Edie–I thought to myself, “Edie sounds familiar…oh my  gracious–suppose he is related to us also? ”  And of course, he is–a 2nd cousin five times removed, on my Father’s side of the family!  Oh my gracious, oh my gracious! 

The story goes that on the morning of January 27, 1857, Ned went to confront his “best friend” Charles over his behavior towards a young woman and Ned himself, the night before.  It is said that Charles had been drinking heavily the night before. It is also said that Charles was stronger, bigger and tougher than Ned, so Ned’s other friends had encouraged him to carry a weapon in case he needed to protect himself, if he was to confront the fearsome Charles–his BEST FRIEND!  But Ned was a “gentleman”, who could not disobey the “Honor Code” which demanded a duel in response to such humiliation as Charles had dished out to him. So…Ned carries a borrowed knife and a pistol to go and confront his friend!  Really? There are many details to this story…I will tell you where you can read them for yourself!  It is quite a story!

Of course, hungover college boys are dangerous when tempers flare and friends egg you on! Can’t  you hear the  the chants…”fight, fight!” Fight they did, punching, kicking and finally–stabbing–right through the heart the knife went!  The life of Charles Edie,  age 18, was ended by Edward Langhorne!

Ned was arrested of course and placed in jail! His trial took place on March 13, 1857.  Many people testified on his behalf, although many , including ministers in the community denounced him and the Honor Code of Dueling!  In his book, The Virginia Langhornes, 2013, Blackwell Press, Lynchburg, Virginia, pg. 210, author James Callaway Langhorne gives this great description: Ned’s “subsequent murder trial was one of the great legal spectacles of antebellum Virginia. Although he was acquitted to “such cheering that the judge had to clear the courtroom in order to restore order and discharge the jury,” the incident colored the remainder of his short life!”

Let me tell you a bit about both of  these “boys”. Charles Edie, was born in 1838, in Christiansburg, Montgomery County, Virginia, USA.  His parents were Amanda Melvina Miller and Dr. Joseph Speers Edie, M.D. who had previously taught at Hamden Sydney, and later anguished between earning his doctorate of divinity as he felt called to the ministry, or getting a medical degree as he also felt strongly called to heal.  He was the local doctor in town for many years! His reputation was that of a very kind man who served rich and poor with equal care and talent.  Can you imagine dedicating your life to healing others, but not being available to help your mortally wounded child!  What a nightmare!   

Edward “Ned” Alexander Langhorne was born in 1837, the son of wealthy planter, miller, business tycoon and owner of multiple plantations throughout Virginia and other states–my third great-grandfather, Henry Scarsbrook Langhorne, 1790-1854.  Henry was married twice and Edward is the son of him and his second wife, Ann Eliza Scott.  My family descends from Henry and his first wife, Frances Callaway Steptoe through his son James Steptoe Langhorne, 1822, called “Grandpa Steptoe” and his wife Elizabeth Rachel Omohundro. Also descending from sons of Henry and Frances is the famous  Nancy Langhorne, Lady Astor, from her father Chiswell to his father John to Henry. (Sadly, we missed out on the wealth genes! LOL)

Now let’s look at some other family relationships/issues for a minute–and think about the warnings we’ve heard of cousins marrying and unlucky numbers, LOL Was Ned doomed to problems?  His parents were first cousins, oh dear.  He was one of 13 children!  Oh dear!  Then what…he married his own first cousin!  (“Lions Tigers and Bears, oh my!”)  What else could befall him… accused of murder…war…disease?  Wow!  Yes!  He went in service for the Civil War, and as a First Lieutenant for Company F, 28th Virginia Infantry, Confederate States of America, he fought at First Manasas, but died of Typhoid Fever on Christmas Day, 1861–three years after killing his “best friend”. He left behind a wife and two very small children!

How sad for two young men–and many more!

Above is a picture of a book by William E. Thompson on this “fatal affair”. 

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Hampden Sydney Colege–now and then.

 

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Scottish Ancestors and Living Cousins

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Having my DNA done on Ancestry several years ago, led to a chapter of my life’s journey I could never have imagined. While researching my family’s genealogy, I began meeting other researchers, some of whom also happened to be related to me biologically –proven through DNA.  We had to figure out just exactly how we were related, however!  That was the adventure.  Soon it became obvious that we needed a place where we could talk to each other easily, share discoveries, ideas, and get to know each other. That’s where social media, especially Facebook, came to be so valuable. On Facebook, we could form a group, in this case, people interested in Hogg/Hogue/Hogge research especially, and most of us were related to each other., and soon became friends.  On Facebook, it didn’t matter if we were from Europe or America, we could talk, share, and compare discoveries easily. Across America also, from New York to Virginia to California, and Wisconsin to Florida!  What a wonderful experience.  

Lately, I have been studying the Hogg DNA Project which has been going on for about ten years I think.  The study was directed and articles authored by Henry Dwight Hogge, Ph.D.  Enough people have joined the study, that some conclusions have been made and published.  You can access the data that I draw from for this post at these links: “Hogg DNA Project – Project Results”   Another well-organized site by Henry Dwight Hogge, Ph.D., and one full of great family information and links, is:  “Hogg DNA Project A List of Hogg Lines”

wanted to see if I could organize our family group on Facebook, according to the latest developments in the Hogg DNA Project.  I understand that Dwight has identified at least twenty different DNA groups of Hogg descendants in the United States! Wow! Hogg was a popular name in Scotland!  Dwight says that the name Hogg originally described a yearling sheep, so when surnames began and were generally based on vocation or location, many sheepherders took the name Hogg. They just adopted the name, and now, some 500 years later, we are trying to figure out who is related to whom! What a great adventure!  

One of our group members, a cousin from Wisconsin, Ron Hogue, shared another definition that I like and have found true for the family. 

Our Hogue Family Facebook group currently has 62 members. We are always open for new cousins. Some in the group are not related to us, but “friends” of the family, like Douglas Moncrieff, a professional genealogist from Scotland who has helped guide our research tremendously.  

Most of the members of our group belong to the Hogg DNA Project 
Group I1, cluster 1.  This group connects nine family groups whose DNA show that they share a common ancestor. A few folks in our Facebook group are related to each other, but by DNA not actually related to the I1 groups. By the way, that is not 11 (eleven), that is the letter I, like in Ireland, and the number one,”1″. Hard to tell if you are not familiar with the rankings. This is how I believe our group is organized.  

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 I. These nine different family lines have matching DNA and all belong to the Hogg DNA Project I1 cluster 1 – according to Henry Dwight Hogge, Ph.D., Sept. 2017: 

   1. MD1765a descendants of Alexander Ogg of Maryland, b.ca.1745 

—-Line including Iris Elizabeth Ogg first wife of George Combs
      who married as his     2nd wife Helen Marie Youngblood who descends from linePA1755a and is this author’s paternal Aunt. 

 2. NH1703a descendants of William W. Church b.1855 Montpelier VT 

—-Line including our members Leona and Joann  

 3. GA1770a descendants of James Hogg Sr. of Savannah GA b.1740 

—-Line includes our members: Betty , Jerry Carla  

 4. PA1754a descendants of Robert Hogg b.1721, Southern Scotland 

—-Line including our member Carol. 

5. PA1755a descendants of Robert Hogg b.1725, Scotland d.1747, PA 

—–includes most members of our family group including:  

Ali Holshouser Orcutt, sister of Annie Holshouser, both daughters of Helen Youngblood Holshouser. 

Alice Youngblood, wife of Cecil Hogue Youngblood. Brother of Fulton Youngblood, and Helen Youngblood Holshouser 

Allison, Donna’s daughter 

Barry, Bev, Beverly 

Bonnie – adult children Billy, Kristin, and Jennifer. Tammy  

Charles, Cheryl, Cyndi 

Dee, Donna 

Ellie  

James, brother of Wynn; Jennifer, Ron S’s daughter; Jessica, Joanne 

Lois  

Mae, Marcia, Maria, Michelle 

Rebecca, Robert, Ron H., Ron S. 

Sherry, Stephanie, Sue B., Sue N., Suzy N. 

Vickie, and her 3 adult children Tracy, Tabitha, and Travis, and four adult grandchildren– Courtney, Casey, Scottie, and Kimberley  are members.  

6. PA1825a descendants of James Hogue b.1825, Pennsylvania-no members in our group yet.  
7. RI1690a descendants of John Hogg b.1690 RI-no members. 
8. NI1777a descendants of James Hogg of Northern Ireland b.ca.1777–no members. 
9. IL1825a descendants of John Hogg, d.1825, Vermilion Co. IL—no members. 

It is interesting to note, that in the book, The Genealogy of the Jackson Family, by Hugh Parks Jackson, Hugh Hogue Thompson, and James R. Jackson, 1890, it is stated that the first immigrant in DNA line PA1755, Robert Hogg, b. 1725 in Ayrshire, Scotland, died 1747 in Pennsylvania, was one of nine brothers!  Is it a coincidence that nine different but related families form this one DNA group, I1 cluster1? This is one area needing more research.  

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II. A close match to this group is a DNA group called   I1 cluster 2.  As I understand it, cluster1 and 2 probably share a common ancestor, but maybe 1000 or 2000 years ago! It includes the lines:

    1.  IR1755, Descendants of Samuel Hogg, b. 1755, d. bef. 1802, Ireland.  Includes our Facebook Group Member Dory 

    2.  IR1764, Descendants of the Widow Elizabeth Hogg, b.ca. 1764 County Donegal, Ireland, died in Slippery Rock, Pennsylvania.  

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III. One of the most well-known Hogg lines is SL1580. 

    1. SL1580 and NJ1682 include “descendants of John Hoge b.ca.1580, Musselburgh, Berwickshire, Scotland — John Hoge was the ancestor of William Hoge, b.1660, Musselburgh, Berwickshire, Scotland, who migrated to America in 1682 on the ship Caledonia, arriving in Perth Amboy NJ, marrying Barbara Hume, d.1745, in Frederick Co. VA. We refer to the descendants of William and Barbara by the code NJ1682.” Henry Dwight Hogge, PhD. 

In our Facebook group, we have several members whose DNA matches this group of Hoggs:  Amanda, JoAnn, and Lee Hogg Williams.  

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IV.   Perhaps the most famous Hogg line of all Hogg lines is SL1640.  

    1.  line SL1640 includes ”  descendants of Walter Hogg of Prestonpans, East Lothian, Scotland, b.ca.1640 — Walter Hogg was the ancestor of many Selkirkshire and Roxburghshire Hoggs, including James Hogg, The Ettrick Shepherd, (a famous poet). The lines previously identified as SL1698 and SL1753 have been combined into this line.” –Henry Dwight Hogge, PhD  

   In our Facebook group, we have two members from this famous DNA group, Helen B. and Nancy. 

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 V.   Some of the earliest Hogg family members came to Colonial Virginia, and have records recorded in the Virginia Colony as early as 1657. In the Hogg DNA Project, this group is identified as:  

   1.  line VA1657:  “descendants of John Hogg of New Kent Co. VA — John Hogg came to Virginia in 1657 as headright to Capt. Leonard Chamberlain (C&P Vol. 1, p. 346, 451). He settled in New Kent Co. As a result of the DNA study, we have learned that line NC1720, descendants of Gideon Hogg of Caswell Co. NC, and line VA1790, descendants of Sampson Hogg of Virginia and Indiana, are part of this line. Consequently, we have merged those trees into this tree.” –Henry Dwight Hogge, PhD 

In our Facebook group, our own Gary H. is a descendant of this group. 

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 VI. A second but unrelated Hogg family in early Virginia was:  

1. line VA1658: descendants of William Hogg (Hoges) of York Co. VA — William Hoges is first mentioned in the records in York County in 1658. (By DNA this line is NOT related to line VA1657-“descendants of John Hogg of New Kent Co. VA — John Hogg came to Virginia in 1657 as headright to Capt. Leonard Chamberlain (C&P Vol. 1, p. 346, 451). He settled in New Kent Co. As a result of the DNA study, we have learned that line NC1720, descendants of Gideon Hogg of Caswell Co. NC, and line VA1790, descendants of Sampson Hogg of Virginia and Indiana, are part of this line.” –Henry Dwight Hogge, PhD. 

This line, VA 1658, includes my own cousins, children of my mother’s sister. My main Hogue line is through my father.  My mother’s sister married a man named W. R. Buck, and his mother’s line shares this DNA line as well.  Of course, I am only related to my first cousins, not their father’s line of ancestors. Still, it is an interesting connection. 

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VI.   Hogg DNA Line VA1745  

      1.  descendants of James Hogg of Edinburgh Scotland — “The traditional story is that James Hogg of Scotland, b.1680, was the father of James Hogg, Thomas Hogg, and Capt. Peter Hogg who came to Virginia in 1745. Capt. Peter Hogg served with Washington in the French and Indian War. The records show that Capt. Peter Hogg considered Thomas Hogg Sr. to be his brother, but DNA from descendants of Capt. Peter Hogg does not match DNA from descendants of Thomas Hogg Sr. We presume that Thomas Hogg Sr. was a half-brother (with different fathers) of Capt. Peter Hogg and James Hogg.”– Henry Dwight Hogge, PhD 

This line includes our treasured group member, Dee Horn.  

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Isn’t it amazing!  Due to the popularity of DNA testing in genealogy; the hard work of scientists like Henry Dwight Hogg, PhD, in organizing and completing DNA studies; and the ease of meeting people as never before by internet programs like Facebook, Ancestry, and many more sites, we are able to meet cousins all over the world, and trace our ancestry back many centuries.  The Scottish people must be amazing, because the people in our Facebook group, all descendants of Scots, are amazing—what a joy and a gift to know them!  

Until we meet again, Helen Youngblood Holshouser

“Sharing Love with Family, Hoggs, and Kisses” 

by artist and family member Lee Hogg Williams

– available as a puzzle or a dry erase board along with other fun items 

at:    https://www.zazzle.com/hoggs_kisses_dry_erase_board-256007096373918872

This blog post was first published on the Blog Worldwide Genealogy, A Genealogical Collaboration, on September 29, 2017, by Helen Y. Holshouser

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Genealogy Research Identifies Easter Traditions from Relatives and Ancestors Worldwide

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In my genealogical research, I have learned that my family is a typical American melting pot of ethnic origins! Our ancestors hail from Denmark, England, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Scotland, Sweden, and Switzerland—at least. As we are preparing for our own Easter celebration, I was wondering how similar or how different some of my ancestor’s traditions might have been.  

Our own traditions include attending church as we were raised Protestant and believe that Easter represents the death and the rising of Jesus Christ, Son of God, to save us all from our sins and to give us eternal life.  It is basically, the basis of our Faith, and, is such an important time in the life of Christians.  We celebrate Easter with a long season of Lent.  However, Holy Week is marked with Maundy Thursday Communion in church on the Thursday before Easter Sunday.  This communion celebrates the Lord’s last supper with his disciples. On Good Friday, we gather at church to mourn the death of Christ upon the cross. Our own church holds a “Tenebrae service of Shadows”.  One of our daughters will sing special music with the choir, “One Sacrifice”.   The service itself begins with 14 lighted candles in the sanctuary, and as Christ walks his final passion, each candle is extinguished to signify his abandonment.  Easter Sunday, we gather to celebrate the joy of Christ’s resurrection and His salvation for each of us individually throughout the whole world. This is an astounding day for many of us faith wise!

Part of the joy of Easter at our house is gathering with family and friends for dinner.  Many in the United States serve ham for this dinner with other spring vegetables especially like asparagus and carrots for the Easter bunny. Surely you see turkey and beef as well. My own sister, however, serves a Crown Roast of Lamb every Easter without fail!  Bunny rabbit salads made of half pears are a treat for our family.

Since our family includes young grandchildren, an Easter egg hunt is in order for the day!  Of course, we give the children Easter baskets full of trinkets, chocolate, and other candy.  We hard boil and decorate Easter eggs as well.  In our own family, we often hide the baskets and the children have to follow clues to find them!

Easter 2015, hunting eggs with Katy and Evie

This is one way to hunt eggs! -grandchildren of author, personal library, HY Holshouser. 

Evie, Katy, and Liam with Easter Bunny, 2016

Grandchildren visiting the Easter Bunny—from the personal library of this author, H Y Holshouser.

What about our Hogue ancestors from Scotland?  I understand that they especially were sheepherders and that their and most Scottish Easter dinners include roasted lamb!  As with us in America, chocolate is the taste of the day!  Dessert might be chocolate cake and coffee! Chocolate eggs and bunnies are ever present for both! Easter egg hunts, horse displays, and battle reenactments make for fun and festive occasions. Of course, churches throughout Scotland hold special Easter services like ours, to celebrate Christ’s rising from death and giving us the grace of salvation. We had many ministers, mainly Presbyterian, in our Hogue family.  In fact, we are told that our first immigrant from Scotland was a Covenanter.  A covenanter was one of the many Scottish people who fought against the Catholics for the right to have their own personal covenant with God. In fact, his persecution by the Catholics apparently led to his flight to America.

Our Kearse family from Ireland and the same ancient family, the Des Cearsais of France, how did they celebrate Easter?  The French word for Easter is Pâques. To say Happy Easter, you can say “Joyeuses Pâques or “Bonnes Pâques.”  According to my general research, Easter is an important holiday in France also. It is a religious one, and a lively, fun time with Easter egg hunts to honor the coming of Spring. Like Ireland, roast lamb is the choice for a large family meal. In Ireland, it is also an important religious holiday as well, with many traditions. Confession on Good Friday, silence on the Saturday before Easter lends to a meditative state. Eggs take center stage on Easter as they are given up for the forty days of lent by many.  Chocolate eggs, decorated eggs—all symbolizing Spring, new beginnings, renewal and joy!

What about the Langhornes and others from England? Among many lovely and fun Easter traditions, Easter parades are one of the greatest. Children and adults don new clothes for good luck, and often children make elaborate paper hats to wear as they march in their local town parades!  Fun! Egg rolling, hot cross buns, Simnel cake, Morris dancing, and so much more contradicts the vision of the staid Englishmen and women! 

Abingdon Traditional Morris Dancing Princess Royal

 

Our marvelous Italian ancestors and relatives add so much spirit to our family. The BottosRaffosRivaros, Costas, DeSantos,  and more, mostly originate in the coastal area of northwestern Italy, near Genoa. Italy of course, is home to the Vatican, and the place for the pilgrimage of so many Catholics on Easter.  My mother’s Italian ancestors were Catholic as well.  Mass on Good Friday in St. Peter’s Basilica is followed by the Pope leading a candlelight procession on a walk symbolizing Christ’s walk to the cross.  Our own church reenacts this walk to the cross, and we are protestants.  

St. Peter’s Square, Vatican City, Andreas Tille – Own work, Permission details Quote of http://fam-tille.de/italien/rom/2004_030.html – Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this images under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.1 or any later version published

 

As I understand it from relatives, northern Italian Easter feasts often feature ham, like us!  Interesting. Of course, salami is a big choice as well.  Colomba, a dove shaped cake, made of almonds, egg whites, and sugar, is probably the most famous cake and available worldwide these days.

Italian bread with almonds and sugar,Colomba-Pasquale

Colomba Pasquale, An Italian Sweet bread J.P.Lon~commonswiki

What about our German JungblutsYoungbloods? And my husband’s Haulzhausen—Holshouser family?  According to a wonderful article from DW –Deutsche Welle —  http://www.dw.com/en/german-easter-traditions/a-1520904 — the Germans of course, also celebrate a religious holiday like most Christians.

Although mainly a Christian holiday commemorating the crucifixion and resurrection of Jesus, Easter also marks the beginning of spring. The Germans, of course, have a whole range of customs and traditions to celebrate the change of seasons in proper fashion.

A time for eggs and bunnies

Eggs and bunnies are two of the oldest symbols of Easter in Germany and every spring shops boom with eggs and bunnies made of chocolate, cardboard or flowers in different sizes and wrappings.

The tradition for using eggs and bunnies for Easter originates from pagan worshipping where they were symbols of fertility and new birth and traditionally used for celebrations of the coming of the spring.

The Germans have a number of egg games which the children play over the holidays. One tradition is to blow eggs and paint them in multiple colours and patterns on Good Friday. The eggs are then put in a basket for the Easter bunny — Osterhase— to hide around the house on the night leading up to Easter Sunday. On the morning of Easter Sunday, the children go hunting for the eggs and often find that the Easter bunny has also left chocolate eggs and Easter presents for them to find.

It is also a custom that friends exchange the painted eggs as gifts or that young people in love paint eggs for their sweetheart.” Now that is a different tradition, which I find so special and romantic!  

For the Netherlands and our Van Vreeland, Van Swol, Voorhees, and Banta families, what was Easter like for them? According to many articles, they celebrate much the way we do…. or we celebrate much the way they do!  One of our favorite meals is a festive brunch and apparently, it is theirs as well:  eggs, cheese, ham, rolls…and did I say eggs?  The Dutch also take great pride in providing the thousands of tulips to decorate St. Peter’s in Rome for the Pope’s Easter service.  Wow!  Back home, they are also known for their beautiful painted eggs.  However, they do not have the Easter bunny, but the “Paashaas, the Easter hare!  

Our ancestors represent many more countries and traditions from around the world, but as you and I can readily see, we are more alike than different.  This Easter, as I pray, and as I play, I will have a keener sense of connectedness due to my genealogical research, and our worldwide collaboration.

Until we meet again, Helen Youngblood Holshouser

 

 

 

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Honoring the College and University Level Teachers in Our Family, Past and Present

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Teachers teach all other professions

During the months of September and October, 2015, we’ve been honoring and recognizing the Educators in our Family Tree, past and present. I am presenting quite a few educators in today’s blog post. I am sure that there are many more whom I either have not identified, or did not know. Please feel free to comment and tell me about those I have missed so that I can either include them here with a correction or write an addendum.

It just so happens that I had the blessing in my life to teach children with behavioral and emotional issues in first  through sixth grade right out of college. After being at that level for three years, I moved to the Junior High level where I taught students aged 12-16, they would be classified middle and high schoolers today.  When we first moved to Raleigh, North Carolina in 1980, I had the opportunity to teach Interpersonal Communication at North Carolina State University for 3 years as a “Visiting Lecturer”. Most of you know, with my BA from Greensboro College and my MA in Clinical Psychology from Chapman College,  I went on to become an individual and family therapist for twenty years after that.  My point is to say, having taught at the different levels, and known so many teachers over the years, I can say that teaching is challenging at all levels! The challenges are different for sure, but the ultimate goal  is to educate, and every single level is needed to create success at the next level! We cannot skip any level of development and learning and expect to have a well-educated person! As the saying above aptly states, “Teaching is the profession that teaches all other professions!”  Nothing could be more true! Why then don’t we make the salary of our CEO’s!  I’d vote for that!  It’s past time the importance and value of our teachers be more highly recognized by our States and National Government budget makers!

We have amazing people in our family–I hope you will enjoy “meeting” these people  and knowing just a bit about what they do and where they teach, if you want to be in touch with any of them, let me know and I will ask them to get in touch. I am presenting them in alphabetical order by first name, we are family after all!

Carol E. Winters, 2013Carol E. Winters, PhD, RN, CNE (Doctorate, Registered Nurse, Certified Nursing Educator) my cousin through the Scottish Hogue family, is currently a Professor of Nursing at East Carolina University in Greenville, NC.  She is the Director of the MSN Nursing Education Concentration–she teaches Graduate level nurses to be Nursing Educators! Carol served as the Dean of the School of Nursing at Hawaii Pacific University in Hawaii for 16 years before returning home to North Carolina.  Carol has a BA in Christian Education from Greensboro College in Greensboro, NC, then an M.S. in Nursing at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. She earned her PhD at the University of Pittsburgh in Pennsylvania.  Not only has she these teaching , leadership accomplishments, but so much more! She is a published author, has been a hands-on nurse of obstetrics, and since 2009, has been a Faculty Advisor for the NFLA, Nurse Faculty Leadership Academy, a national organization sponsored by Sigma Theta Tau, the International Nursing Honor Society jointly with the Elsevier Foundation. There is so much more I could tell you about this dynamic woman who happened to be my college roommate and friend of almost 50 years! We only discovered our cousinship last year through my genealogical research!  She has three children, five grandchildren, and has done vast amounts of volunteer work in her communities, and served and led many committees.

 October 1, 2015,–Carol Emerson Winters was honored as the 2015 Nurse Educator of the Year by the NCNA, the North Carolina Nursing Association! CONGRATULATIONS! AN HONOR WELL DESERVED! congratulations in gold

My Hogue cousin, Dee Horn, has tutored College level     Dee Horn also   English at two  different colleges over the years. I have known many college level tutors. When I was at NC State University I quickly learned how invaluable they were to many students–like those who had learning disabilities, some who were blind, and  even some who were valuable sports team members who needed extra help to keep up with academics during their physically demanding playing and practice seasons. We take our hats off to one on one teachers! 

Donna Miller 3Another Hogue cousin  Donna Miller earned her degree from Indiana University of Pennsylvania and taught Business Education  at the High School level, in Business Schools, and at Community Colleges.  Life, marriage, and children took her from Pennsylvania to Connecticut and Rhode Island.  In Norwich, Connecticut, for 23 years, she taught at a business school and served as an Academic Dean!  After retirement, she worked  part-time at Three Rivers Community College.  

When I asked Donna about some memories, she  said several things which I wanted to share.  One was a simple teaching technique but fun: “I liked making the students think about what they were doing. Sometimes I would purposely make a spelling or grammatical error on a test and then tell the students that they would get extra points if they found it.” That’s the kind of thing that adds an extra challenge and a bit of fun for students!   She went on to say: “It’s the one profession where students have actually come back and said, ‘Thank you for believing in me,’ or ‘pushing me,’ or ‘making me realize that I can do . . . .’  When you are finished teaching, you know that despite some of the negatives (there were stressors), you feel that you have done something positive with your life.”  Oh yes! I know a lot of the educators we have profiled feel this way, and it is why we admire and love them so!  When a teacher’s philosophies so resonate with you, you know you’d love to have that teacher for yourself, or for your children, and you know with certainty that they are a GREAT teacher! 

My first cousin James Goodell, great-great grandson of Goodell, James McClainJ.Steptoe Langhorne, has taught computer sciences for many years at Menlo College in Atherton, California. He studied at the University of Freiburg located in Freiburg im Breisgau, Baden-Württemberg, Germany.  He currently serves as President of the Goodell Corporation, a family real estate school and business his father founded.

Youngblood, LarryLarry Youngblood is one of our multi-leveled/multi-talented teachers as well! For years he has home schooled his grandchildren through all the levels of education!  Having studied at Texas A&M University Larry  has taught at Private Catholic Schools, Business Schools and Universities.  For several years now, Larry has been the Administrator of the International Youngblood DNA Project researching the  different family lines of Youngbloods evidenced by their dna.  He is currently writing a book about the Youngblood/Jungblut/Jungbloedt families. Thank you Larry! 

Pat Spangler, PhD, my second cousin, son of Charles Langhorne Spangler and Kittie Cockram Spangler, grandson of  Fanny Langhorne, and Great Grandson Spangler, Pat, PhD 2014of J.Steptoe Langhorne is a geophysicist in a family with three close cousins who are/were geophysicists! What honor he and they bring to our family!  You can read a previous blog post featuring them  at  Buck, Spangler and Houchins, Three Cousins Who are Geophysicists as Well!   Pat Spangler, PhD, is retired from the University of Florida, and thus his title is now Associate Professor Emeritus of Geology. Pat has published extensively and is highly respected in the academic community as well as in his family community.

Rick White, PhD, Donald Richard White, Professor, 3x gr grandson of James Steptoe LanghorneI am thrilled to introduce to many of you, our cousin Dr. Rick White, PhD, Chemist. Rick is the second great-grandchild of James Steptoe and Elizabeth Rachel Omohundro Langhorne, same as James Goodell, Roger Buck IV, PhD and I are. Pat Spangler above is their great-grandson. Rick is a Professor of Chemistry at St. John’s River State College in Jacksonville, Florida after a twenty plus year career in industry. He has also taught at Florida Southern College, and at the University of Tampa. He earned his PhD at the University of Florida and did post doctoral studies at King’s College in London. (At the time of his post doctoral work, the school was called Queen Elizabeth College, but Margaret Thatcher consolidated the colleges in the mid-1980’s and it became King’s) Rick has three sisters by the way, more cousins for us to enjoy. Another extremely accomplished professional, Rick has over 25 peer-reviewed publications, and over 200 internal company reports from his time with industry.

Rick worked for over twenty years for Procter and Gamble. Twelve of those years were spent in their Food and Beverage business before moving to their Health Care business where he worked for another ten years! He was an analytical chemist, supporting all aspects of product development, from inception to launch. Some of the products he worked with included brands you will recognize like Folger’s Coffee, Pringles Potato Chips, Citrus Hill Orange Juice, Pepto-Bismol, Metamucil, Crest Toothpaste, and Vick’s cough and cold remedies! Just think, from now on when you pick up one of those products, you will know that our DNA is part of the brain that helped develop them! We are very proud to be related to you Dr. Rick White!

Voorus House, Dorothy Pearl

Voorus Home in PA

Robert Voorus, 1891-1985, my cousin through the Spangler and Hogue families, had brothers and sisters  who were featured in the earlier educator posts. Robert worked in the Library of Congress as a young man. When he moved back to Pleasantville, Pennsylvania he taught at a Business School in Oil City, Pennsylvania. He is remembered by family as an excellent educator. 

Roger Buck,III was a master’s level Marine Biologist. He spent Buck, Walter Roger Buck, IIImost of his professional life researching for the Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Gloucester Point, VA, which is now part of William and Mary College for their Oceanography Concentration.  Roger not only researched heavily, but he taught at William and Mary College and earlier at Duke University. With all of his major accomplishments, Roger, my Uncle by marriage to Katherine Langhorne Kerse, was a kind and genteel man who raised a son and a daughter who both earned their  PhD.  His son, W. Roger Buck IV,  became an educator and research scientist as well, while his daughter Tyler Buck is a financial analyst and advisor with her own company.

Roger Buck, IV,PhD, my first cousin through the Kerse, buck, Walter roger Buck IVHouchins, Langhorne families, is a Professor of Geophysics at Columbia University in New York. His speciality is earthquakes and he researches through Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory in New York.  He has traveled the world lecturing and researching as he says, from “collecting rock samples for radiometric dating in Egypt, and in the Mojave Desert, to diving on the Reykjanes Mid-Ocean Ridge in a Russian submersible, and helping with GPS surveys on Iceland.” What amazing adventures this cousin has experienced!

I just want to make a couple observations regarding our families. The Langhornes were a wealthy family from England. But James Steptoe Langhorne became blind, several of his children, grandchildren and more, were blinded by the same inherited disease, his only natural son drowned at age 16, and after the Civil War, he was land poor and devastated!  Wouldn’t he be amazed and gratified that his grandchildren and greats would grow to be such good and educated people, and educators! He and his wife Elizabeth started a school and a Sunday School in Meadows of Dan, Virginia both of which were very important to them. We have carried on that philosophy–because it is imbedded in our DNA?  It is interesting!

The Hogues emigrated from Scotland, the Youngbloods from Germany, while the Voorhees originated in the Netherlands.  They fought in our Revolutionary War and our Civil War and many others. They were honorable people who supported their new country, but most of all, the Voorhees and  Hogues were Presbyterian Ministers and educators. It is amazing to me to see the traditions and/or the DNA at work in such a continuing fashion.

 What accomplishments for all of us to be proud of, and thankful for! Thank you our family members who educate all of us– for your inspiration, your wisdom, and your hard work! We honor all of you as you have honored us!

Teaching quote, wisest-mind-george-quote

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Honoring the School Principals in our Family–Past and Present, Part 2 of 2

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Leadership Quote by John-Quincy-Adams on inspiring

Youngblood, Kay in front of bookshelvesToday I want to introduce you to  a true leader and another school Principal in  our family tree!  Kay Youngblood Fuller is my 2nd cousin on my father’s side of the family. We knew each other as children in Richmond,Virginia,  then lost touch until we ended up at the same small Methodist College, Greensboro College in Greensboro, North Carolina. This allowed us to renew our friendship which has lasted uninterrupted since then in 1968! Being friends with this dynamic leader and ball of fire is amazing all by itself!  She is fun to observe and fun to be with–she’s like the driving force or the wind beneath a lot of people’s wings! Kay has been married for 45 years, and has three children and three grandchildren. Like many educational leaders, she has done it all!

After college, Kay went on to earn not one, but several Master’s degrees! She earned a Masters in Curriculum at Elon College, in Elon, NC. She also earned a Master’s in Educational Administration at University of North Carolina at Pembroke, UNCP. As if that wasn’t enough, she completed all but her dissertation in Educational Leadership from UNCP/East Carolina University! What’s amazing is that Kay did all this while parenting three small children! When Kay walks into a room, people notice the energy she exudes!

Giving you the briefest synopsis of Kay’s career is still amazing in my opinion!  I neglected to tell you that Kay is also a talented musician, playing several instruments and singing beautifully! Think God gave her enough talents? The wonderful thing is that she uses them! She served as a Director of Music at Harrells Christian Academy in Harrells, North Carolina, then held the same position at  Heritage Academy in Newman, Georgia.  When her family relocated to Greensboro, NC, Kay started teaching eighth grade Math, first at Mendenhall Middle School, then at Kiser Middle School for the Guilford County Public School System. I personally was thrilled when her husband’s job brought them to Raleigh, NC where I was living.  The Wake County Public Schools System was very happy to have this experienced educator to teach 8th grade Math and English at Ligon Gifted and Talented Magnet Middle School, where both of my children attended!  Never a family to let grass grow under their feet, Kay soon found herself teaching in Laurinburg, NC where she not only taught 8th grade Math, but became the AIG-Academically/Intellectually Gifted Program Facilitator at Spring Hill Middle School! Her leadership skills firmly recognized and tested, she was chosen the Assistant Principal of I.E. Johnson Elementary School, then the Principal of Scotland High School of Leadership and Public Service in Scotland County, North Carolina!  After serving Scotland County Schools as the Director of Secondary Education, at only age 63, Kay retired with 37 years in education!

What did this amazing woman do upon retirement?  She was asked, and agreed to teach Algebra II for one year at Hickory Grove Christian School in Charlotte, NC!  This year she is administering an NC Quest Grant for Richmond County Schools!  Whew! Wow! Awesome! I can hardly catch my breath just thinking of this whirlwind flying through life!  I’d certainly have to compare her to a soaring Eagle when I think of this quote which I believe describes her very well:

Leadership eagle

Bill Williamson was married to my first cousin Claudia.  We already had the chance to meet his dynamic Williamson, Bill, Principaldaughters, teachers Becky W. Stodola and Stephanie W. Nicklin. He has a very entrepreneurial son, Bill Jr, a good businessman as well! Bill Sr. was a popular Science teacher at Matoaka High School in Chesterfield County, Virginia,  where he was also a football coach. He was later tapped to be the Principal there where he was so well-known. I wonder if that made his job harder or easier?  He served as Principal at two other schools as well, Kanawha Elementary in Cumberland County, Virginia, and  Mechanicsvile Junior High School in Mechanicsville, Virginia.  Bill also earned three Master’s degrees– one from the University of Virginia and two from Virginia Commonwealth University!  We do have an educated family–one who lives by their strong beliefs in the importance of education!  Tragically, Bill was killed in an automobile accident when he was only fifty years old. He would have been so proud to see how well his children have done professionally and personally–how they have followed in his footsteps in education. How they’ve become good people who care about others. His grandchildren as well, four of them, all growing into smart, exciting young men and women. We are blessed by this family in ours and in our world!

Hogg, Calvin, principal and Dory grandfatherAn ancestor Principal, Calvin Hogg, was born 10 Mar 1883 in Slippery Rock Township, Butler County, Pennsylvania, and died 15 May 1962 in Cherry Township, Butler County, Pennsylvania.  He is related to  our family on both my father’s side through his Hogues and Watts, and on my mother’s side of the family through the Hoges and the Spanglers! Isn’t that amazing! I did  not know this until I started working on genealogy and met his granddaughter, my cousin, Dorothy Voorus Hogg Moore, called Dory. The Spanglers are related to Dory through her Voorus/Voorhees line of ancestors!  Amazing.  Calvin and his whole family were educators. We already met and heard about his wife Dorothy and her sisters, Bessie, and Lena. His son, Dory’s father,  Robert Arthur Hogg, taught Science and later became a Guidance Counselor.  We will hear about another of Dorothy’s brothers when we meet our college educators.

Calvin was an interesting person. He served in the Armed Services in World War I. When he returned, he earned his BA from Grove City College and his MA from the University of Pittsburgh. He then taught at Karns City Elementary. Later he served as the Principal at both Harrisville and at Evans City School. He moved on to be a District Supervisor and the Assistant Superintendent of Butler County Schools until he retired in 1953. What a career he had!  How much would I have liked to have had the opportunity to talk with him about all of his experiences over the years.  He attended schools before the turn of the 20th century, then taught and lead them for another half century, can you imagine what he could tell us?  He was retiring about the time  Juel Turner from our last post was beginning his educational career. We know Juel filled his own pot-bellied stoves for warmth in his classroom and taught and served as Principal at the same time–can you imagine what the classroom was like for Calvin Hogg?  I would have loved to hear his stories! 

Five School Principals profiled, five in one family system! I think  that is pretty amazing, and I am sure there are more of whom I am not aware.  These five however, bring us great honor as a family, and so we honor them back! Thank you for all of your hard work, for the huge gift you have given our society and our family as you have chosen to lead the call for the importance of education!  

Our last educator posts will focus on our college professors and instructors.  We have quite a few of these talented individuals who represent our family well. Please share your thoughts with us, tell us about your favorite educator, tell us about  some of these if you knew them. Until we meet again, keep on learning! 

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Honoring the Teachers in Our Family

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School is starting again this week for millions of children around the USA and the world. What a perfect time for me to tell you about some of the teachers in our family tree. I can count almost forty teachers in just a couple of generations!  What a legacy they are leaving, what an example they are and have set! I am so proud of each of these educators, and so pleased to be counted among them and related to them!

Teachers are so important, how is it that we, as a society forget that, or neglect them sometimes?  All it takes is to send your 5 year-old child or grandchild off to school under someone else’s control, influence, and guidance all day, to realize just how important they are! As the years progress, not only do we count on teachers to socialize our children, we count on them, depend on them to actually educate them! We want our children not only to read, write and do math, but to learn to think critically and solve life’s problems well! We might also hope they learn a sport and sportsmanship. What about a foreign language? Art, music, theatre, calculus, geometry, history? Yes, we want it all–and we don’t want our teachers to complain that they are poor or to act out in any way!  Wow! Tall order!  I am proud to say many men and women in our family have chosen this noble profession!  

This post will highlight family members who have chosen Special Education and Elementary School Teaching for their career.  The next couple of posts will  feature Middle and/or Junior High School teachers then climb the ladder through High School, and meet the Principals are in our family tree! There are also family members who’ve taught in our business schools, community colleges, and Universities as well! All of these educators represent a  great deal of brain power! 

Special Education Teachers are teachers who teach children with cognitive and/or developmental impairments, learning disabilities, and behavioral  and emotional difficulties that impede learing. They are courageous and magical! 

Kerse, Janey Bell

Janey Bell Kerse Sommers

Previously I wrote a blog post about my Mother’s sister, my Aunt Janey Bell Kerse Sommers! She was a teacher of students with behavioral and learning problems. She spent over twenty years dedicated to helping them do the best they could do, then became the Special Education Supervisor for all of Forsyth County Public Schools, Forsyth County, N.C.,  mentoring other teachers along the way. You can see her story “Janey Bell Kerse Sommers, 1923-2002, Brilliance and Joyfulness Dimmed by Alzheimer‘s” by clicking on the title.

Helen Y. Holshouser, about 48 years old

Helen Y. Holshouser in 1997

  What is amazing to me, is that even though Janey Bell Somers had no children of her own, she inspired several generations of young people to teach and to learn. She motivated me to teach students with special needs–in learning, in behavior, which I did for seven years before I became a family therapist. I taught children in elementary school at first, then I moved to a Junior High where I had children ages 12-16 in my classroom . Their academic skills ranged from about 3rd grade to 9th grade, and I prepared individualized plans for each student at their level in each subject!  Every day we worked on social and behavioral skills and goals as well. One student got angry while in time out, and set our classroom which was in a mobile unit (trailer) behind the school, on fire! Another time a student attacked me physically and took me backwards, over the sofa where I was seated, onto the floor! One student hot-wired and stole my car! (He brought it back after a brief joy ride!) LOL, no wonder I had a heart attack at age 50!  I was challenged everyday with these students, and cared for them deeply. 

Youngblood Kerr, Susan

Susan Youngblood Kerr

One of my younger cousins is still teaching Special Education– Severe Behavioral Needs Children, now in her 33rd year! Susan Youngblood Kerr who lives in Missouri with her husband and three children,  has two Master’s Degrees, one in Special Education and one in Educational Leadership. She served as a Language Arts teacher to General Education students for several years and worked for others at the Middle School level. Susan was honored when one of her former students got in touch with her recently with a heartwarming message: (This from a student she had in 1985. He was from the projects–no dad–she never met his mom.)

“Hi Young lady well so nice to hear from you. I was unforgettable– I hope that’s a good thing. how’s your family doing? fine I hope. they have the greatest mom in the world but you already know that. well I’m doing great myself –just retired last year from the Navy after 20 years of service. I live in Japan with my lovely wife and 3 beautiful kids. yes who would ever think me a husband and a father! well for what it is worth I’ve always known that you cared about us kids even then. when I think about any teacher that cared and made a difference in my life, you are #1 on my list and I mean that from the bottom of my heart!  so you see you did make a change in a little boy’s life, but now I’m a man. thanks and God bless.” 

Wow! The above brings tears to my eyes–what a great tribute! 

 

Nichols, JonathanRemarkably, we have another young cousin, also through the Langhorne line, who taught students with behavioral and emotional difficulties!  Jonathan Daniel Nichols is my second cousin, and he taught in Maryland. He is smart, caring and well-respected.  He continued a family tradition he didn’t even know existed when called to teach the most challenging students.  We especially need men to serve as role models for this population of students. I am so proud of him.

Special Education seems to be a calling for many in our family,Houchins, Mrs. John L. Josephine Ellis Bell as we had a Great Aunt Josephine Bell Houchins who taught deaf students at the Virginia School for the Deaf and Blind in Staunton, Virginia for many years. I remember how interesting it was to go and visit her and her husband my Great Uncle John Langhorne Houchins, and see her talking with the students in sign language. During breaks I was mesmerized to watch the students gather with their friends and engage in animated sign language chatting just like we did between classes at school, only they were quieter but more expressive.  

Jamie Beck SkinnerAnother Youngblood cousin, my second, once removed, Jamie Beck Skinner is a Special Education Paraeducator at Abingdon Elementary School in Abingdon, Maryland. While the teacher leads a group activity, Jamie might be giving another student private reading lessons. She is truly a para–beside–educator who teaches where and when the teacher cannot. It makes it possible to reach some students, to prevent melt-downs, to teach to certain strengths and weaknesses not possible with only one teacher in the room! What a blessing a paraeducator in the classroom is! 

Goodell, Mary, edited from weddingIt’s hard to believe, but in our immediate family system, I have another cousin who is a Special Education Supervisor! She serves the people of New Hampshire!  Mary Casey Goodell is a dynamic, dedicated educator who has been mentoring other Special Education teachers for many years now!  So, two supervisors of Special Education, and eight special education teachers in one family, pretty amazing!  I wonder if there is a call to serve others embedded in our dna?

Elementary School Teachers

Those who teach kindergarten through fifth grade work with children as they meet a great number of their developmental milestones, socially, physically, and intellectually.  Teachers and parents are the ones who help mold and shape us at these formative ages. My sister Anne Youngblood Prince Anne Y. Prince, 2015has retired now after teaching fourth, fifth, and sixth grades in both public and private schools for over 36 years!  She earned her Master’s Degree in Reading at the University of Richmond (Virginia).  Most of her teaching career was spent guiding fourth graders at St. Christopher’s School, a private Episcopal school for boys in Richmond, Virginia. Anne was highly dedicated to her students and was an excellent teacher who was always thinking about, training for, or putting into practice her myriad skills to give her students the best education possible. You couldn’t ask for a kinder, smarter, more successful teacher. She taught long enough to teach the children of some of her students who were so proud to have their children in her care. 

Youngbloods, Liz, and her children, Mary taylor, Susan, and Lewis IIIOne of Anne’s mentors was Elizabeth Walker Youngblood, wife of Lewis Jr. and mother of  Mary, Lewis III, and Susan. As described above, Susan is now teaching for her 33rd year! What a great influence Liz was for her children and many others.  Liz and Anne, my sister,  taught fifth grade at L.L. Beasley Elementary School in Prince George County, Virginia at the same time, and my sister remembers her as creative, skilled and highly motivated to do an excellent job.   I remember Liz also as a wonderful, firm, kind, and very intelligent woman.  Unfortunately, she is the second teacher in our family taken ill by that crushing disease Alzheimer’s! Liz also served as an assistant principal  as well in a school in Colonial Heights, Virginia.

My sister Anne tells an interesting story about how she first met Elizabeth Walker Youngblood in 1952.  Anne was in fourth grade at Bon Air Elementary School, and was her classroom’s representative to the Red Cross School Committee. Elizabeth was the Red Cross School Coordinator for all the schools in Chesterfield County,Virginia.  Liz sat right down beside Anne and introduced herself as the fiancée of her cousin!  (Her husband Lewis Jr. was our father’s first cousin.)  “Let me show you my ring. I just got engaged to your cousin!” Elizabeth was so kind to ten-year old Anne, that they became friends for life and then coworkers.

My first cousin once removed, Susan Youngblood Rawls, Youngblood, Susan Rawlstaught fifth grade for ten years at Crestwood Elementary School in Chesterfield County, Virginia.  She is now the Director of a preschool. Energetic, enthusiastic, and smart as a whip, she is quite amazing! How lucky are all the little children, all the families who enter her school! She will help get them started in the right direction, will help lay the ground work for their happiness and their learning the rest of their lives!  That is one tall order and a major accomplishment! 

Lauren Ruby editedLauren Ruby, daughter of Jamie Beck Skinner and another Youngblood cousin, teaches Kindergarten at Taneytown Elementary school in Carroll County, Maryland. Do you remember the poem by Robert Fulghum that reminds us what we need to succeed in life we learned in kindergarten? Well, that’s Lauren– preparing her students to succeed in life and in school! A tall order that she handles with aplomb! 

Kindergarten all I ever needed to learn

Maryrose Youngblood, my first cousin once removed in my wonderful family tree, taught fourth grade like my sister for many years in Highland County, Virginia. These Youngblood women– we are hard workers, and we are directors at heart and by dna!  Kind, efficient, smart…Maryrose was an outstanding  teacher. 

Youngblood, Marshall daughter kathy Lee Pack 2015Kathy Lee Pack, daughter of Marshall Youngblood Lee and Robert Lee, has been teaching at the elementary school level in Florida for 31 years this year!  All of those years were as a 4th grade teacher until the last two when she changed to second grade! Kathy has four adult children and grandchildren to keep her busy. She is my second cousin once removed, and a Youngblood woman through and through. By that I mean she can handle a room full of 30 restless 6 year olds and make them feel good about themselves because they chose to complete their math assignment while she was reading with a small group! 

A cousin through the Voorus, Hogue, and Spangler family lines, Vorus, BessieBesse B. Voorus was born December 12, 1893.  Miss Voorus was graduated from Pleasantville High School and received her bachelor of arts degree from Slippery Rock Normal School. She was an elementary school teacher for over 43 years, teaching in both the Oil City and Meadville School Districts in Pennsylvania.  One of her great nieces remembers her mother talking about having Bessie as a teacher and her encouraging them to learn about Geography especially.  Wouldn’t it have been a surprise to realize a little girl you taught in elementary school would grow up to marry your nephew and her children would be your great nieces and nephews! 

Besse taught for forty-three years  and died in 1992 at 98 years old! Can you imagine what she witnessed in her lifetime!? The things she witnessed and was able to teach her students–she lived through horse and buggy days to automobiles and rockets to the moon! She saw cooking with wood to gas, electricity and even microwaves! Television didn’t exist in her childhood, but later became a huge part of our lives! Talk about having to be adaptable! Just to live successfully she had to be willing to change, grow, and adapt–weren’t her students lucky to have such an experienced teacher and a versatile one! 

Vorus, Dorothy Pearl VorusBessie’s sister, Dorothy Pearl Voorus Hogg was a teacher also, teaching in Slippery Rock, Pennsylvania. Her husband was also a teacher who will be featured as well.  Dorothy and Calvin had six children of their own, can you imagine how busy this lady was day in and day out! . She began teaching in a one-room school-house with all grades together, and taught long enough to enter a modern elementary school building in the 1950’s and into the early ’70s! This kind of longevity always inspires me. 

Lena Voorus is the third sister to teach in the Elementary Voorus, Lena had a stroke, very sweetSchools of Slippery Rock, Pennsylvania! Born in 1889, Lena died in 1978 all in Venango County, Pennsylvania. Unfortunately, Lena had a stroke and became wheelchair bound. Her sisters took care of her and stayed supportive of each other. Her great nieces and nephews remember her as sweet and kind, a great tribute. What’s amazing to me, is that these women, born in the late 1800’s, at a time when women didn’t generally work outside the home, went out and got their education, and worked at a profession. That takes a lot of courage and fortitude, good for them! 

Julia Houchins Patterson

Julia in the 1940’s

My Great-Aunt Julia Houchins Nichols became an attorney. However, she was only 15 in 1900 when her mother died. Her father soon deserted his six children and moved out-of-state. Thank heavens the children did have a guardian angel and grandparents nearby. Nonetheless, never one to let grass grow under her feet, Julia went out and got a job teaching.  The story goes that Julia, only a teen still, went to apply for a teaching job in the mountains of southwest Virginia in Patrick County, where she lived.  The person interviewing her asked her what she could tell him that would impress him and make him think she was smart enough to teach. She told him she could tell him exactly how many boards for lumber he could get from any sized tree.  She had caught his attention, and he pointed to a tree outside the window and said “Okay, tell me how many boards could you get from that tree? Julia solved the problem aloud, and her reasoning and math skills so impressed the man, he hired her on the spot! Later she told family that she was so thankful that her family member, I’m not sure who, had worked in a sawmill, so that she had learned this skill. I’m sure she was an excellent teacher, she had four younger brothers to wrangle with after her mother died, children didn’t scare her! Julia lived from 1885 to 1969, another witness to travel by horse to travel by rockets to the moon! She served as the very first female Assistant District Attorney in the State of Virginia. Julia was a force to be reckoned with, and was highly loved by her family and still is today by grandchildren who are now grandparents themselves! 

Eight Special Education teachers, and ten Elementary Education teachers–what a group to be proud of, but they are not all of the educators in our family!  In the next post I will tell you about our Middle and High School teachers as well as our  Principals, and College Professors! What a legacy they are creating or have left for our family.

 It’s Fall– “time to go back to school”– it seems that teachers  hear this call in their souls!  

Teacher , Thank-a-Teacher

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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