Heart of a Southern Woman

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Jamestowne Colony Ancestors–20 Grandparents ! — 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks, #52

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Born and raised in Richmond, Virginia, we lived only a couple of hours from Jamestown! We went there often in my childhood, to Yorktown and Williamsburg as well. My mother was very interested in history, and wanted to be sure her children understood their Virginia history! She was also very interested in family history, but as far as I know, she had no idea that she had grandparents who had lived in Jamestown! Oh my gracious, she would have been so excited to know all this I’m sure! I am excited as well! As my genealogical research progressed, I began to realize we had some lines of ancestors that extended back to that time frame. However, I had not investigated particularly if we had ancestors who were on the “approved” lists from the Jamestown Society indicating that you did indeed have ancestors from Jamestown. As I approached the end of this 52 ancestors in 52 weeks challenge, I decided to write about some of our first ancestors–the Huguenots, Pilgrims on the Mayflower, and Jamestown Settlers. I gathered all the lists I could find, and started searching! Some were easy as I readily recognized the names!  Several were amazing to me, because I had perhaps stopped at a daughter or son, never dreaming that including one more generation would take me to Jamestown! Wow! Altogether, as of this writing, I have identified twenty grandparents who were present in Jamestown, and therefore would make my siblings and I , and many of my cousins eligible for membership in the Jamestowne Society. That is simply amazing to me!

I am going to list all twenty of our grandparents here, and highlight the ones I’ve already blogged about–so that you can simply click on them and see their story. At the end of this post, just for information’s sake, I will list their relationship trees. Therefore cousins can tell who comes through the Houchins, the Langhornes, the Omohundros, etc. and see their own relationships.

The very first discovery I made that I’d not known of before, just blew me away! I was looking at the lines, and noticed a Mirian Newport married to a William Hatcher. It was the Newport name that caught my attention. I knew I had seen that name on the lists.  I thought I’d extend her line a bit, and who turned out to be her father? Oh my gracious, none other than Captain Christopher Newport, Captain of the Susan Constant and in charge of all three ships that sailed to Jamestown! I had no idea, and was so excited! He is our/my ninth great- grandfather! His daughter Marian is my eighth great-grandmother and is a qualifying ancestor in her own right! Her husband William Hatcher, my eight great-grandfather is identified as well!  William Hatcher served for many years in the House of Burgesses. 

The following story, originally shared to his family tree on ancestry, by Theodore Walker27, by an unknown author, can be found on ancestry, and is very interesting about the Susan Constant and Captain Newport:

“The Susan Constant, captained by Christopher Newport, was the largest of three ships of the English Virginia Company (the others being the Discovery and the Godspeed) on the 1606-1607 voyage that resulted in the founding of Jamestown in the new Colony of Virginia. Susan Constant was rated at 120 tons. Her keel length is estimated at 55.2 feet (16.8 meters). Her overall length from tip to stern is estimated at 116 feet. On the 1606-1607 voyage, she carried 105 colonists, all male.  She returned to England in May 1607. She served as a merchant ship through at least 1615. Her fate is not known. The alternative name Sarah Constant has been cited, and is shown as being the name noted on the earliest document, leading to a belief that Samuel Purchas had the name wrong in his Pilgrims book.  There is growing support for the name Sarah Constant. The article that cites the Sarah Constant is as follows:  He tolde me of three barques on route to the New Worlde, thouse whose names are, as he tolde me thereon, be consysted of “Godspeed”, “Discoverie” or “Discovery”, and one whose name splyte twice, I think ´was “Sarah Constant”.- presumably written by Sir Walter Raleigh. December 20, 1606, 150 passengers left Blackwall, London, England in three London (Virginia) Company ships, Susan Constant with Master Christopher Newport and 71 passengers, Godspeed with Capt. Bartholomew Gosnold and 52 passengers and the Discovery under Capt. John Ratcliffe, carrying 21 persons. They headed for the New World.  After 18 weeks, the ships landed in Cape Henry, Virginia. 105 survivors established the town of Jamestown. April 30, 1607: The ships arrive at Cape Comfort, a vanguard boat stopped at Kecoughtan where the natives welcomed the English Settlers”

If you like interactive websites, and if you’d like to know more about the women in Jamestown, there is a wonderful website titled the National Women’s History Museum.  There we learn that the  Englishmen named the river that flows into the Chesapeake Bay the James River and named their settlement Jamestown, both to honor their King, James I. The settlers of Virginia were looking for gold especially, but none was to be found!

In this same website we finally learn about the women in Jamestown!  ” For over a year after the founding of Jamestown, no English women lived in the colony. Then in October of 1608, two women arrived with the “Second Supply” of men and provisions. Thomas Forrest, listed as a gentleman in the supply lists, brought his wife, Anne Forrest, and her maid, Anne Buras. Buras was about fourteen years old when she arrived. She married the carpenter John Layton within a year, an event that Captain John Smith described as the first wedding held in Virginia. Anne Layton later gave birth to a daughter, named Virginia. While the Laytons are not mentioned again in later records, their arrival represents the beginning of families in Jamestown.

In August of 1609, about twenty women arrived on ships sent by the Virginia Company of London. One hundred more women arrived a few months later. Many of the female passengers on the first ships were traveling with their husbands and families. All were recruited by the Virginia Company, a land-development, stock-issuing corporation based in London.  For the most part these women’s names are lost, but a few survive in the record.”

Lo and behold,  listed on this website, is Jane/Joan Pierce, my grandmother!  Until this very moment I didn’t know she and her daughter existed, only men are usually discussed! “Joan Pierce sailed with her husband William and daughter Jane. By all accounts, Joan was a dauntless woman and enjoyed the challenges of living in Virginia. During a visit to England in 1629, she was described as “an honest and industrious woman [who] hath been [in Virginia] nearly 20 years.” She apparently considered the new colony rich in resources; she was quoted as saying that “she can keep a better house in Virginia . . . than in London.” Many women were in the same situation: while their men took off for the New World, women supported their families and managed the finances. Before leaving England to join their husbands, these women made the decisions about selling property and planning for the long voyage.” 

“Her daughter, Jane Pierce, married John Rolfe, the widower of Pocahontas. Pocahontas had been the favored daughter of Chief Powhatan, and her marriage to Rolfe in 1614 brought over eight years of peace between the settlers and Native Americans, during which the colony was able to produce profitable tobacco. Pocahontas died in England in 1617, and Rolfe returned to Jamestown. He became active in colonial politics and married Jane Pierce later that year. They had one daughter, Elizabeth, also named for the powerful Virgin Queen.”National Women’s History Museum.   Jane Pierce was my 10th great Aunt, with her sister Edith being my 10th great-grandmother!  Edith Pierce married Jerimiah Clements, my 10th great-grandfather. It is so amazing to me, that I happen to share the Pierces and the Clements with other genealogical researchers–making us cousins now as well as friends! 

Our ancestors:

  1. Nicholas Martiau, see blog
  2. Lady Jane Berkeley, wife of Nicholas Martiau
  3. Christopher Newport
  4. Daughter Marian Newport
  5. William Hatcher, Marian’s husband
  6. Jerimiah Clement
  7. Edith Pierce, wife of Jerimiah, daughter of Capt. Wm.Pierce, my 10th
  8. William Pierce
  9. William Pierce, son of above
  10. Jane or Joan Phippen Pierce, wife of the Capt. above
  11. John Pinkard
  12. John Browning
  13. Robert Beverly
  14. Peter Beverly
  15. Francis Fairfax
  16. Myles Cary
  17. Henry Cary
  18. John Carter, 1613
  19. John Langhorne
  20. wife Rebecca Carter

From Jamestown Rediscovery we learn that the “Recent discovery of the exact location of the first settlement and its fort indicates that the actual settlement site was in a more secure place, away from the channel, where Spanish ships could not fire point-blank into the fort. Almost immediately after landing, the colonists were under attack from what amounted to the on-again off-again enemy, the Algonquian natives. As a result, in a little over a month’s time, the newcomers managed to “beare and plant palisades” enough to build a wooden fort. Three contemporary accounts and as ketch of the fort agree that its wooden palisaded walls formed a triangle around a storehouse, church, and a number of houses. It is amazing to realize that my own 9th great-grandfather Nicholas Martiau, a Huguenot, French Engineer, helped design and build the  improved palisades around the Jamestown Fort in 1620, allowing for the survival of some of the settlers  during the 1622 Indian Massacre. 

While disease, famine, and continuing attacks of neighboring Algonquins took a tremendous toll on the population, there were times when the Powhatan Indian trade revived the colony with food in exchange for glass beads, copper, and iron implements. It appears that eventual structured leadership of Captain John Smith kept the colony from dissolving. The “Starving Time” winter followed Smith’s departure in 1609 during which only 60 of the original 214 settlers at Jamestown survived. That June, the survivors decided to bury cannon and armor and abandon the town. It was only the arrival of the new governor, Lord De La Ware, and his supply ships that brought the colonists back to the fort and the colony back on its feet. Although the suffering did not totally end at Jamestown for decades, some years of peace and prosperity followed the wedding of Pocahontas, the favored daughter of the Algonquian chief Powhatan, to tobacco entrepreneur John Rolfe.

The first representative assembly in the New World convened in the Jamestown church on July 30, 1619. The General Assembly met in response to orders from the Virginia Company “to establish one equal and uniform government over all Virginia” which would provide “just laws for the happy guiding and governing of the people there inhabiting.” The other crucial event that would play a role in the development of America was the arrival of Africans to Jamestown. A Dutch slave trader exchanged his cargo of Africans for food in 1619. The Africans became indentured servants, similar in legal position to many poor Englishmen who traded several years of labor in exchange for passage to America. The popular conception of a race-based slave system did not fully develop until the 1680s.”

The Algonquian eventually became disenchanted and, in 1622, attacked the out plantations killing over 300 of the settlers. Even though a last-minute warning spared Jamestown, the attack on the colony and mismanagement of the Virginia Company at home convinced the King that he should revoke the Virginia Company Charter; Virginia became a crown colony in 1624.

The fort seems to have existed into the middle of the 1620s, but as Jamestown grew into a “New Town” to the east, written reference to the original fort disappear. Jamestown remained the capital of Virginia until its major statehouse, located on the western end of Preservation Virginia property, burned in 1698. The capital was moved to Williamsburg that year and Jamestown began to slowly disappear above ground. By the 1750s the land was owned and heavily cultivated, primarily by the Travis and Ambler families.

You can read or listen to the history of Jamestown in so many places, I have not tried to tell you even half of the history here. I have included a video which is very instructive in the history. I am going to list some of the websites I utilized as well, especially the ones with the lists of settlers, much more than the beginning ones listed here: From the website Historic Jamestown, , Understanding America’s Birthplace, we find this list of the very first settlers and their occupations!

 

 Original Settlers–Spring, 1607

Name Occupation
  • Master Edward Maria Wingfield
  • Captaine Bartholomew Gosnoll
  • Captaine John Smyth
  • Captaine John Ratliffe
  • Captaine John Martin
  • Captaine George Kendall
Councell
  • Master Robert Hunt
Preacher
  • Master George Percie
  • Anthony Gosnoll
  • Captaine Gabriell Archer
  • Robert Ford
  • William Bruster
  • Dru Pickhouse
  • John Brookes
  • Thomas Sands
  • John Robinson
  • Ustis Clovill
  • Kellam Throgmorton
  • Nathaniell Powell
  • Robert Behethland
  • Jeremy Alicock
  • Thomas Studley
  • Richard Crofts
  • Nicholas Houlgrave
  • Thomas Webbe
  • John Waler
  • William Tanker
  • Francis Snarsbrough
  • Edward Brookes
  • Richard Dixon
  • John Martin
  • George Martin
  • Anthony Gosnold
  • Thomas Wotton, Surgeon
  • Thomas Gore
  • Francis Midwinter
Gentlemen
  • William Laxon/Laxton
  • Edward Pising
  • Thomas Emry
  • Robert Small
  • Anas Todkill
  • John Capper
Carpenters

First Supply, January 1608

Name Occupation
  • Matthew Scrivner
appointed to be of the Councell
  • Michaell Phetyplace
  • William Phetyplace
  • Ralfe Morton
  • William Cantrill
  • Richard Wyffin
  • Robert Barnes
  • George Hill
  • George Pretty
  • John Taverner
  • Robert Cutler
  • Michaell Sickelmore
  • Thomas Coo
  • Peter Pory
  • Richard Killingbeck
  • William Causey
  • Doctor Russell
  • Richard Worley
  • Richard Prodger
  • William Bayley
  • Richard Molynex
  • Richard Pots
  • Jefrey Abots
  • John Harper
  • Timothy Leds
  • Edward Gurganay
  • George Forest
  • John Nickoles
  • William Gryvill
Gentlemen
  • Daniell Stalling
Jeweller
  • William Dawson
  • Abraham Ransacke
Refiners
  • William Johnson
  • Richard Belfield
Refiners
  • Peter Keffer
A Gunner
  • Robert Alberton
A Perfumer
  • Raymond Goodyson
  • John Speareman
  • William Spence
  • Richard Brislow
  • William Simons
  • John Bouth
  • William Burket
  • Nicholas Ven
  • William Perce
  • Francis Perkins
  • Francis Perkins
  • William Bentley
  • Richard Gradon
  • Rowland Nelstrop
  • Richard Salvage
  • Thomas Salvage
  • Richard Miler
  • William May
  • Vere
  • Michaell
  • Bishop Wyles
Labourers
  • John Powell
  • Thomas Hope
  • William Beckwith
  • William Yonge
  • Laurence Towtales
  • William Ward
Tailers
  • Christopher Rodes
  • James Watkings
  • Richard Fetherstone
  • James Burne
  • Thomas Feld
  • John Harford
Apothecaries
  • Post Gittnat
A Surgeon
  • John Lewes
A Couper
  • Robert Cotton
A Tobacco-pipe-maker
  • Richard Dole
A Blackesmith
  • With divers others

                                                                  Second Supply, Fall 1608

Name Occupation
  • Captaine Peter Winne
  • Captaine Richard Waldo
Were appointed to bee of the Councell
  • Master Francis West
  • Thomas Graves
  • Rawley Chroshaw
  • Gabriell Bedle
  • John Russell
  • John Bedle
  • William Russell
  • John Gudderington
  • William Sambage
  • Henry Collings
  • Henry Ley
  • Harmon Haryson
  • Daniell Tucker
  • Hugh Wollystone
  • John Hoult
  • Thomas Norton
  • George Yarington
  • George Burton
  • Henry Philpot
  • Thomas Maxes
  • Michaell Lowicke
  • Master Hunt
  • Thomas Forest
  • William Dowman
  • John Dauxe
  • Thomas Abbey
Gentlemen
  • Thomas Phelps
  • John Prat
  • John Clarke
  • Jefry Shortridge
  • Dionis Oconor
  • Hugh Wynne
  • David ap Hugh
  • Thomas Bradley
  • John Burras
  • Thomas Lavander
  • Henry Bell
  • Master Powell
  • David Ellys
  • Thomas Gipson
Tradesmen
  • Thomas Dowse
  • Thomas Mallard
  • William Taler
  • Thomas Fox
  • Nicholas Hancock
  • Walker
  • Williams
  • Morrell
  • Rose
  • Scot
  • Hardwin
Laborers
  • Milman
  • Hellyard
Boyes
  • Mistresse Forrest, and Anne Burras her maide
  • eight Dutch men and Poles, with some others

Relationship Charts for Ancestors in Jamestown,

Capt. Christopher Newport (1563 –  1616) is your 9th great grandfather

 Marian Newporte (1615 – 1646)

daughter of Capt. Christopher Newport

Susannah Hatcher (1646 – 1699)

daughter of Marian Newporte

 Anne Burton (1670 – 1736)

daughter of Susannah Hatcher

 George Stovall (1705 – 1786)

son of Anne Burton

 Rachel Stovall (1760 – 1850)

daughter of George Stovall

 Mary Dillon Polly Turner (1796 – 1879)

daughter of Rachel Stovall

 Elizabeth Rachael Omohundro (1825 – 1915) daughter of Mary Dillon Turner

 Evaline (going blind when died young)) Langhorne (1866 – 1900)

daugh of Elizabeth Rachael Omohundro

Katherine Steptoe Houchins (1883 – 1943) daughter of Evaline (going blind when died young)) Langhorne

Margaret Steptoe Kerse (1918 – 1980)

Daugh. of Katherine Steptoe Houchins

 Helen Spear Youngblood

You are the daughter of Margaret Steptoe Kerse

 ____________________________________________

William Hatcher (1613 – 1680)

is your 8th great grandfather

Susannah Hatcher (1646 – 1699)

daughter of William Hatcher

Anne Burton (1670 – 1736)

daughter of Susannah Hatcher

George Stovall (1705 – 1786)

son of Anne Burton

Rachel Stovall (1760 – 1850)

daughter of George Stovall

Mary Dillon Polly Turner (1796 – 1879)

daughter of Rachel Stovall

Elizabeth Rachael Omohundro (1825 – 1915)

daughter of Mary Dillon Polly Turner

Evaline (going blind when died young)) Langhorne (1866 – 1900)

daughter of Elizabeth Rachael Omohundro

Katherine Steptoe Houchins (1883 – 1943)

daughter of Evaline (going blind when died young)) Langhorne

Margaret Steptoe Kerse (1918 – 1980)

daughter of Katherine Steptoe Houchins

Helen Spear Youngblood

You are the daughter of Margaret Steptoe Kerse 

 _________________________________________________

Nicholas Martiau (1591 – 1657)                        

is your 9th great grandfather

Mary Jane Martiau (1631 – 1678)

daughter of Nicholas Martiau

John Scarsbrook (1676 – 1704)

son of Mary Jane Martiau

Col. Henry Scarsbrook (1700 – 1773)

son of John Scarsbrook

Elizabeth Cary Scarsbrook (1721 – 1802)

daughter of Col. Henry Scarsbrook

Maj. John Scarsbrook Langhorne (1760 – 1797)

son of Elizabeth Cary Scarsbrook

Henry Scarsbrook Langhorne (1790 – 1854)

son of Maj. John Scarsbrook Langhorne

James Steptoe (blind) Langhorne (1822 – 1905)

son of Henry Scarsbrook Langhorne

Evaline (going blind when died young)) Langhorne (1866 – 1900)

daughter of James Steptoe (blind) Langhorne

Katherine Steptoe Houchins (1883 – 1943)

daughter of Evaline (going blind when died young)) Langhorne

Margaret Steptoe Kerse (1918 – 1980)

daughter of Katherine Steptoe Houchins

Helen Spear Youngblood

You are the daughter of Margaret Steptoe Kerse 

————————————————-

 John Pinkard (1647 – 1690)

is your 7th great grandfather

Elizabeth Sarah (widow Eustice) Pinkard (1667 – 1719)

daughter of John Pinkard

Col. James Steptoe Sr., M.D. (1710 – 1778)

son of Elizabeth Sarah (widow Eustice) Pinkard

James Steptoe Jr. (1750 – 1826)

son of Col. James Steptoe Sr., M.D.

Frances Callaway (blind) Steptoe (1798 – 1832)

daughter of James Steptoe Jr.

James Steptoe (blind) Langhorne (1822 – 1905)

son of Frances Callaway (blind) Steptoe

Evaline (going blind when died young)) Langhorne (1866 – 1900)

daughter of James Steptoe (blind) Langhorne

Katherine Steptoe Houchins (1883 – 1943)

daughter of Evaline (going blind when died young)) Langhorne

Margaret Steptoe Kerse (1918 – 1980)

daughter of Katherine Steptoe Houchins

Helen Spear Youngblood

You are the daughter of Margaret Steptoe Kerse 

 ___________________________________________________

Jerimiah Clements (1607 – 1657)

is your 10th great grandfather

Capt. John Clements (1631 – 1710)

son of Jerimiah Clements

John Clements (1669 – 1704)

son of Capt. John Clements

Stephen Clements (1692 – 1746)

son of John Clements

Joyce Clements (1739 – 1821)

daughter of Stephen Clements

Edward Houchins (1760 – 1846)

son of Joyce Clements

BENNETT HOUCHINS (1780 – 1815)

son of Edward Houchins

William Houchins (1807 – 1860)

son of BENNETT HOUCHINS

Nancy J Houchins (1833 – )

daughter of William Houchins

Walter Houchins (1854 – 1937)

son of Nancy J Houchins

Katherine Steptoe Houchins (1883 – 1943)

daughter of Walter Houchins

Margaret Steptoe Kerse (1918 – 1980)

daughter of Katherine Steptoe Houchins

Helen Spear Youngblood

You are the daughter of Margaret Steptoe Kerse 

 _____________________________________________________

Capt. William Pierce (1560 – 1622)

is your 11th great grandfather

Edith Pierce (1607 – 1644)

daughter of Capt. William Pierce

Capt. John Clements (1631 – 1710)

son of Edith Pierce

John Clements (1669 – 1704)

son of Capt. John Clements

Stephen Clements (1692 – 1746)

son of John Clements

Joyce Clements (1739 – 1821)

daughter of Stephen Clements

Edward Houchins (1760 – 1846)

son of Joyce Clements

BENNETT HOUCHINS (1780 – 1815)

son of Edward Houchins

William Houchins (1807 – 1860)

son of BENNETT HOUCHINS

Nancy J Houchins (1833 – )

daughter of William Houchins

Walter Houchins (1854 – 1937)

son of Nancy J Houchins

Katherine Steptoe Houchins (1883 – 1943)

daughter of Walter Houchins

Margaret Steptoe Kerse (1918 – 1980)

daughter of Katherine Steptoe Houchins

Helen Spear Youngblood

You are the daughter of Margaret Steptoe Kerse – 

___________________________________________________

Capt. John Browning (1588 – 1646)

is your 10th great grandfather

Thomas Browning (1620 – 1679)

son of Capt. John Browning

John BROWNING (1640 – 1690)

son of Thomas Browning

Thomas Browning (1660 – 1725)

son of John BROWNING

Mary Browning (1685 – 1739)

daughter of Thomas Browning

Richard Omohundro III (1709 – 1754)

son of Mary Browning

Richard Omohundro IV (1740 – 1811)

son of Richard Omohundro III

Ellis Putney Omohundro (1790 – 1852)

son of Richard Omohundro IV

Elizabeth Rachael Omohundro (1825 – 1915)

daughter of Ellis Putney Omohundro

Evaline (going blind when died young)) Langhorne (1866 – 1900)

daughter of Elizabeth Rachael Omohundro

Katherine Steptoe Houchins (1883 – 1943)

daughter of Evaline (going blind when died young)) Langhorne

Margaret Steptoe Kerse (1918 – 1980)

daughter of Katherine Steptoe Houchins

Helen Spear Youngblood

You are the daughter of Margaret Steptoe Kerse

______________________________________________

Frances Fairfax (1580 – )

is your 9th great grandmother

Peter Beverley (1610 – 1650)

son of Frances Fairfax

Maj. Robert Beverley Sr. (1641 – 1687)

son of Peter Beverley

Mary Beverley (1678 – )

daughter of Maj. Robert Beverley Sr.

Maurice Langhorne (1719 – 1791)

son of Mary Beverley

Elizabeth Langhorne (1758 – 1818)

daughter of Maurice Langhorne

Henry Scarsbrook Langhorne (1790 – 1854)

son of Elizabeth Langhorne

James Steptoe (blind) Langhorne (1822 – 1905)

son of Henry Scarsbrook Langhorne

Evaline (going blind when died young)) Langhorne (1866 – 1900)

daughter of James Steptoe (blind) Langhorne

Katherine Steptoe Houchins (1883 – 1943)

daughter of Evaline (going blind when died young)) Langhorne

Margaret Steptoe Kerse (1918 – 1980)

daughter of Katherine Steptoe Houchins

Helen Spear Youngblood

You are the daughter of Margaret Steptoe Kerse 

___________________________________________________

Robert Beverley (1577 – 1613)

is your 9th great grandfather

Peter Beverley (1610 – 1650)

son of Robert Beverley

Maj. Robert Beverley Sr. (1641 – 1687)

son of Peter Beverley

Mary Beverley (1678 – )

daughter of Maj. Robert Beverley Sr.

Maurice Langhorne (1719 – 1791)

son of Mary Beverley

Elizabeth Langhorne (1758 – 1818)

daughter of Maurice Langhorne

Henry Scarsbrook Langhorne (1790 – 1854)

son of Elizabeth Langhorne

James Steptoe (blind) Langhorne (1822 – 1905)

son of Henry Scarsbrook Langhorne

Evaline (going blind when died young)) Langhorne (1866 – 1900)

daughter of James Steptoe (blind) Langhorne

Katherine Steptoe Houchins (1883 – 1943)

daughter of Evaline (going blind when died young)) Langhorne

Margaret Steptoe Kerse (1918 – 1980)

daughter of Katherine Steptoe Houchins

Helen Spear Youngblood

You are the daughter of Margaret Steptoe Kerse

_____________________________________________

Col. John Carter (1613 – 1669)

is your 8th great grandfather

Mary Margaret Carter (1637 – 1678)

daughter of Col. John Carter

Mary Beverley (1678 – )

daughter of Mary Margaret Carter

Maurice Langhorne (1719 – 1791)

son of Mary Beverley

Elizabeth Langhorne (1758 – 1818)

daughter of Maurice Langhorne

Henry Scarsbrook Langhorne (1790 – 1854)

son of Elizabeth Langhorne

jnJames Steptoe (blind) Langhorne (1822 – 1905)

son of Henry Scarsbrook Langhorne

Evaline (going blind when died young)) Langhorne (1866 – 1900)

daughter of James Steptoe (blind) Langhorne

Katherine Steptoe Houchins (1883 – 1943)

daughter of Evaline (going blind when died young)) Langhorne

Margaret Steptoe Kerse (1918 – 1980)

daughter of Katherine Steptoe Houchins

__________________________________________

Miles Cary (1622 – 1667)

is your 9th great grandfather

Henry Cary (1650 – 1720)

son of Miles Cary

Elizabeth Cary (1678 – 1691)

daughter of Henry Cary

Col. Henry Scarsbrook (1700 – 1773)

son of Elizabeth Cary

Elizabeth Cary Scarsbrook (1721 – 1802)

daughter of Col. Henry Scarsbrook

Maj. John Scarsbrook Langhorne (1760 – 1797)

son of Elizabeth Cary Scarsbrook

Henry Scarsbrook Langhorne (1790 – 1854)

son of Maj. John Scarsbrook Langhorne

James Steptoe (blind) Langhorne (1822 – 1905)

son of Henry Scarsbrook Langhorne

Evaline (going blind when died young)) Langhorne (1866 – 1900)

daughter of James Steptoe (blind) Langhorne

Katherine Steptoe Houchins (1883 – 1943)

daughter of Evaline (going blind when died young)) Langhorne

Margaret Steptoe Kerse (1918 – 1980)

daughter of Katherine Steptoe Houchins

Helen Spear Youngblood

You are the daughter of Margaret Steptoe Kerse

_____________________________________________

This is IT! I did it! I completed writing about 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks! Actually, more than that as many posts dealt with multiple ancestors like this one! What a difference a year makes! Fifteen years ago, I was told I would only live five years or so, now this year, my fifteenth year of survival with severe heart disease, I have accomplished this challenge, and I have written a novel! Amazing!Thanks to Amy Johnson Crow for issuing and maintaining the challenge, and thanks to all the other authors who’ve shared their techniques and their family stories! I could not have done all of this without the support of my family and friends who have encouraged me every step of the way! Thank you so very much! It has been a wonderful experience! 

  

Fireworks!

 

 Sugggested reading and reference:

–Jamestowne Society, Richmond, Virginia, http://www.jamestowne.org/  (includes list of approved ancestors)

–National Park Service, Historic Jamestowne,    http://www.nps.gov/jame/historyculture/index.htm

–National Women’s History Museum, https://www.nwhm.org/online-exhibits/jamestownwomen/index.htm

–Historic Jamestown, http://www.historicjamestowne.org/history/

–Jamestown Settlement and Yorktown Victory Center,  http://www.historyisfun.org/jamestown-settlement/jamestown-ships/?

–Jamestowne Rediscovery, http://apva.org/rediscovery/page.php?page_id=6

–History of Jamestown, Virginia (1607–99), Wikipedia Encyclopedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Jamestown,_Virginia_(1607%E2%80%9399)

 –Washington and Northern Virginia Company Jamestowne Society ,  http://www.jamestowne-wash-nova.org/index.htm

  –Our Ancestors in Jamestown Virginia, http://www.genealogical-gleanings.com/Jamestown.htm

 –Author: Virginia Lee Hutchenson Davis. Commemoration of the 400th Aniversity of the Landing at James Towne, 1607-2007

 Jamestown Book

 

 

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Henry Cary, 1650-1720, Builder of the Colonial Capitol Building in Williamsburg–52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks #18

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Ali, Liam and katy in front of Colonial Capital Building in Williamsburg Virginia, May, 2014

Ali Holshouser Orcutt with children Liam and Katy visit the Capitol building in Colonial Williamsburg, a replica of the one built by Henry Cary, Ali’s 9th great-grandfather, the children’s 10th!

 

Growing up in Richmond, Virginia, my family traveled to Colonial Williamsburg many times. However, not having done any genealogy at the time, none of us knew that we had grandparents important to the history of the region. My mother loved history– how I wish she were alive to know what I have learned in my genealogical studies. She would be so excited to know that her seventh great-grandfather, named Henry Cary, actually built several famous buildings in the Williamsburg, Yorktown, and Jamestown areas of Virginia. Henry Cary is credited with building the capitol building in Colonial Williamsburg. The picture above shows my daughter Ali Holshouser Orcutt with her children (my grandchildren) Liam 6 and Katy 2. Henry Cary is Ali’s ninth great-grandfather and her children’s tenth. In the picture they can be seen standing in front of the colonial Capitol building rebuilt to look exactly  like the first building by Henry Cary.

Henry Cary was born in Warwick County, Virginia, the son of Miles Cary and Anne Taylor Cary. Miles Cary apparently immigrated to Virginia from England in the early 1640’s and became a member of the Governor’s Council and the House of Burgesses.  He married Anne Taylor and together they had seven children. Henry was born about 1650 and lived until about 1720. He inherited a plantation from his father called the Forest. Henry married Judith Lockey and by her had six children.

 In colonial days in America one did not train to be an architect the way a student does today. However Henry Cary learned the building trade well. We read in the Encyclopedia Virginia,  that he became one of the foremost building contractors in Virginia in the late 1600’s, early 1700’s. In 1697 Cary was paid 28,000 pounds of tobacco to build the courthouse for York County. Based on this and other building successes, he was awarded the contract in 1699 to build the capitol building in Williamsburg.

 From an article published by Colonial Williamsburg, we learn some interesting history about the buildings in colonial Virginia. The colonists in Jamestown lost their statehouse to fire three times over the years. After the third fire, they decided to move their capitol to the Williamsburg area. When Henry Cary built the new Capitol building, he decided to try to reduce the threat of fire. His capitol building was built without fireplaces, and candles and pipes were not allowed. However in   1723, people who used the capitol complained that it was cold and damp, so chimneys were added. On   January 30, 1947, the capitol building that Henry Cary built burned to the ground. It was rebuilt a second time and burned again. In the 1930’s it was reconstructed when Colonial Williamsburg was restored. The current Capitol building is the third building and was based on Henry Cary’s first capitol building due to its ”superior architectural design and construction”. We learn from an article in Wikipedia that Henry Cary’s capital and the new colonial capitol building “was a two-story, H shaped structure, functionally two buildings connected by an arcade. Each wing served one of the two houses of the Virginia legislature, the Council and the House of Burgesses. The first floor of the West building was for the general court and the colony’s secretary, the first floor of the East for the House of Burgesses and its clerk.” Henry Cary completed this project and a nearby prison by 1705.

Henry Cary, built this original capital building in Williamsburg, Virginia, 1705

Original Capitol building in Colonial Williamsburg, Virginia built by Henry Cary, completed in 1705.

 Henry Cary’s excellent work led to his being awarded a contract to build the new Governor’s residence for Virginia in 1706.  However this is when trouble began, leading to the end of Henry’s building career. For one reason or another Henry’s work cost much more than he had projected, creating the need for the Legislature to approve additional funds. When he had not finished the Governor’s residence by 1710, Lieutenant Governor Alexander Spotswood complained to the Governor’s Council and had Henry removed from the project. There was a huge political battle surrounding this incident, and it is hard to tell exactly what was happening. Today we see many good people hurt by politics. Whatever the problem, we can stand proud of the work our grandfather did– building the capitol building in Colonial Williamsburg, credited with building the Governor’s Palace, the Wren House, part of the fort at Yorktown, a prison in Williamsburg, and several other buildings.  I think he is a talented and amazing ancestor to have discovered.

Williamsburg, Va, katy in front of Governor's Palace, designed and built by 19th gr gf, Henry Cary

Katy runs freely in front of the Governor’s Palace in colonial Williamsburg that her 10th great grandfather helped build, May, 2014.

Williamsburg, Va. Liam in front of Governor's Palace

Liam stands in front of the Governor’s Palace in Colonial Williamsburg,Virginia.

                 

Below is a relationship chart showing the descendancy from Henry Cary to my grandson Liam Orcutt.

Henry Cary (1650 – 1720)
is your 10th great grandfather
daughter of Henry Cary
son of Anne Cary
son of Capt. John Langhorne
daughter of Maurice Langhorne
son of Elizabeth Langhorne
son of Henry Scarsbrook Langhorne
daughter of James Steptoe (blind) Langhorne
daughter of Evaline (going blind when died young)) Langhorne
daughter of Katherine Steptoe Houchins
daughter of Margaret Steptoe Kerse
daughter of Helen Spear Youngblood
You are the son of Alexandra “Ali” Kathryn Holshouser

 

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