Heart of a Southern Woman

A snapshot of life one blog post at a time.

Mayflower Ancestors! Thomas Rogers, John Alden, William Mullins & Allied–52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks, # 51

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Mayflower leaving England's shores, Mike@Mike HaywoodArt.co.uk copyrighted, used by permission

Mayflower leaving England’s shores, “A Prosperous Wind” by Mike Haywood , ©2002, Mike@Mike HaywoodArt.co.uk used by permission

 

As I worked further and further back in time in our family tree, I was amazed to realize that my family had ancestors who arrived on the Mayflower! Some people know that their whole lives, they wear it like a badge of honor–“My family arrived on the Mayflower!” As a Southerner, I never even thought about that being part of our family history. Of course, as I’ve learned, my family hails from all over the United States as well as the British Isles and Europe.  I may identify with the Southern United States, but that is only part of our rich family history! It’s so exciting! The Mayflower, Plymouth Rock! The Colony was settled mostly by  people who wanted the freedom to worship as they chose.  They were members of the English Separatist Church and felt persecuted by the Church of England. Ten years earlier a group of Separatists  had left England for Leiden, Holland, in search of religious freedom. It was William Bradford who was their leader and helped them decide to travel to Virginia where the colony of Jamestown had been settled in 1607.  At that time, Virginia reached almost all the way to the Hudson River. Some of the settlers signed  the Mayflower Compact which was an agreement that bound the signers  into  a  governing  body, establishing constitutional law and the rule by majority–an important step towards democracy. We came to call these settlers Pilgrims. They were helped to succeed in establishing their colony by a Native American of the Patuxet people named Squanto. He helped them establish a treaty with Chief Massasoit. Our tradition of celebrating a day for Thanksgiving started in Plymouth.  As I understand it, both as a way to thank the Native Americans for helping them, and as a way of setting aside a day to thank God for their very lives.

Mayflower by Mike Haywood, The Seas Were So High

“Seas So High” by Mike Haywood, ©2002, used by permission, available at Mike@MikeHaywoodArt.co.uk

Just look at this painting! Can you imagine traveling for two months with 102 other people and livestock in this 90 foot long ship! No wonder they were in such bad shape that most of them died the very first year that they lived in America. Can you imagine the courage, the commitment, the beliefs you would have to have to take such a journey to a strange and unsettled land! Now I know three of my grandparents, some cousins, and many people related to my family through marriage did exactly that! What a legacy! Their blood runs in my veins, in the veins of many of you who are reading this article, and to me that is amazing! 1620-2014, 394 years ago–do you think they dreamed their lives would undergo such scrutiny!?

Mayflower, Pilgrim's Landing, by Mike Haywood, Mike@MikeHaywoodArt.co.uk   ©2002 by permission

“Pilgrim’s Landing”, by Mike Haywood, Mike@MikeHaywoodArt.co.uk ©2002 by permission

Another reason I want you to look at these paintings closely, is that these beautiful works of art are displayed here with permission from the artist, Mike Haywood! It helps us understand the journey so strongly I believe! He sells lithographs and canvas prints on his website, I hope to get one soon. In a discussion forum in which I participate, Mike posted this comment: “Help….. I painted this canvas in 2005 as one of my series portraying the dramatic voyage of the Mayflower. Normally I keep my paintings but this one was purchased by a descendant. Because of a computer malfunction, I have lost the name and address of the purchaser, who I would now like to contact. Can any group member shed some light? It is my personal favourite of all my Mayflower paintings. The title of the canvas is “Seas so high”, a phrase extracted from William Bradford’s contemporary account of the voyage……”In many of these storms the winds were so fierce, and the seas so high, as they could not bear a knot of sail, but were forced to heave to for many days together. ……………..Conditions below decks on that cockleshell of a boat would have been ghastly for the passengers.”

If any of you know this information for Mike, please contact him directly at Mike@MikeHaywoodArt.com.uk. –or leave a message here in comments and I will be sure to get the information to him.

I’ve learned that many on that boat were related to my family, or related to us by marriage! I am still amazed.  According to the Mayflower Society,  these are the names of the passengers and crew who were on the Mayflower:

Mayflower (1620)

View the original list of passengers (PDF, 2.6Mb) from the handwritten manuscript of Gov. William Bradford, written up about 1651 (file link is to the State Library of Massachusetts).  Below is a complete list of all Mayflower passengers, along with a link to each for further information.

–source: Caleb Johnson’s Mayflower History

http://mayflowerhistory.com/mayflower-passenger-list/

As you see, Thomas Rogers and his son Joseph are listed among the passengers. Thomas is my 10th great grandfather on my mother’s side, and is my husband’s 11th great grandfather through his Mother! I had no idea my husband and I were cousins until I learned this bit of information! That makes our children and grands double descendants of Thomas Rogers. I have discovered that this is not uncommon for the Mayflower passengers! This is the way our lines look:     

Thomas, Mayflower, Rogers (1572 – 1621)

is your 11th great-grandfather

James Rogers (1615 – 1687)

son of Thomas, Mayflower, Rogers

Thomas Rogers (1639 – 1719)

son of James Rogers

James Rogers II (1668 – 1719)

son of Thomas Rogers

James Capt. Rogers III (1685 – 1755)

son of James Rogers II

James Rev. Rogers IV (1720 – 1775)

son of James Capt. Rogers III

James Rogers V (1746 – 1796)

son of James Rev. Rogers IV

John Rogers (1775 – 1846)

son of James Rogers V

John M. Rogers (1812 – 1847)

son of John Rogers

James H. Rogers (1834 – 1863)

son of John M. Rogers

Reuben Alexander Rogers (1857 – 1935)

son of James H. Rogers

Mary Lou Rogers (1880 – 1947)

daughter of Reuben Alexander Rogers

Helen Marie Wagner (1919 – 1989)

daughter of Mary Lou Rogers

Max Alexander Holshouser

You are the son of Helen Marie Wagner 

*******************************************

 

Thomas “The Pilgrim” Rogers (1572 – 1621)

is your 10th great-grandfather

John Rogers (1609 – 1630)

son of Thomas “The Pilgrim” Rogers

John Rogers (1640 – 1730)

son of John Rogers

Ann Rogers (1680 – 1705)

daughter of John Rogers

Sarah Witt (1695 – 1777)

daughter of Ann Rogers

Abner Harbour (1730 – 1778)

son of Sarah Witt

Moses Harbour (1755 – 1835)

son of Abner Harbour

Joyce Harbour (1805 – 1888)

daughter of Moses Harbour

Nancy J Houchins (1833 – )

daughter of Joyce Harbour

Walter Houchins (1854 – 1937)

son of Nancy J Houchins

Katherine Steptoe Houchins (1883 – 1943)

daughter of Walter Houchins

Margaret Steptoe Kerse (1918 – 1980)

daughter of Katherine Steptoe Houchins

Helen Spear Youngblood

You are the daughter of Margaret Steptoe Kerse 

*********************************************

 

John Alden (1599 – 1687)

is your 10th great-grandfather

Elizabeth Alden (1624 – 1717)

daughter of John Alden

Elizabeth Pabodie (1647 – 1730)

daughter of Elizabeth AldenM

Ann Rogers (1680 – 1705)

daughter of Elizabeth Pabodie

Sarah Witt (1695 – 1777)

daughter of Ann Rogers

Abner Harbour (1730 – 1778)

son of Sarah Witt

Moses Harbour (1755 – 1835)

son of Abner Harbour

Joyce Harbour (1805 – 1888)

daughter of Moses Harbour

Nancy J Houchins (1833 – )

daughter of Joyce Harbour

Walter Houchins (1854 – 1937)

son of Nancy J Houchins

Katherine Steptoe Houchins (1883 – 1943)

daughter of Walter Houchins

Margaret Steptoe Kerse (1918 – 1980)

daughter of Katherine Steptoe Houchins

Helen Spear Youngblood

You are the daughter of Margaret Steptoe Kerse –

***********************************************

William Mullins (1568 – 1621)

is your 11th great-grandfather

Priscilla Molens Mullins (1602 – 1687)

daughter of William Mullins

Elizabeth Alden (1624 – 1717)

daughter of Priscilla Molens Mullins

Elizabeth Pabodie (1647 – 1730)

daughter of Elizabeth Alden

Ann Rogers (1680 – 1705)

daughter of Elizabeth Pabodie

Sarah Witt (1695 – 1777)

daughter of Ann Rogers

Abner Harbour (1730 – 1778)

son of Sarah Witt

Moses Harbour (1755 – 1835)

son of Abner Harbour

Joyce Harbour (1805 – 1888)

daughter of Moses Harbour

Nancy J Houchins (1833 – )

daughter of Joyce Harbour

Walter Houchins (1854 – 1937)

son of Nancy J Houchins

Katherine Steptoe Houchins (1883 – 1943)

daughter of Walter Houchins

Margaret Steptoe Kerse (1918 – 1980)

daughter of Katherine Steptoe Houchins

Helen Spear Youngblood

You are the daughter of Margaret Steptoe Kerse 

 

While Thomas’s eldest son Joseph came over with him on the Mayflower, his son John, whom I descend from, and his son James, whom Max descends from came over later and became landowners in Plymouth Colony also. There is so much I’d like to tell you about the Rogers family and their rich, rich history! I think however, it will have to wait for a separate blog post. I do want to remind you that  these relationships are based on my own research, which is always a process, and have not been proven by any of the governing bodies or societies. 

Because they are ancestors of our ancestors, we are also kin to John Alden, Priscilla Mullins and her father William Mullins.  My daughters would have loved their 12th great- grandfather, William Mullins, because he was apparently a shoemaker, who reportedly took over 250 pairs of shoes and boots with him on the Mayflower! The colonists didn’t go barefooted!

John Alden and Priscilla Mullins would have made a romantic pair on the voyage as well, they apparently fell in love during the arduous trip!  From John Alden & Priscilla Mullins Biography from the website: Alden Kindred of America, we learn that: “Priscilla Mullins was the daughter of William Mullins, also a passenger on the Mayflower with his wife Alice and son Joseph.  William, Alice and Joseph all died in the terrible sickness and deprivation of the first winter in Plymouth.  Priscilla, who as probably still too young to be married, was orphaned, her only surviving kin her brother and sister in England.  Poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow celebrated the story of how Priscilla attracted the attentions of the newly widowed Captain Myles Standish, who asked his friend John Alden to propose on his behalf only to have Priscilla ask, “Why don’t you speak for yourself, John?”  Most of the world draws its image of the Pilgrim story from Longfellow’s epic narrative poem, The Courtship of Myles Standish. The basic story was apparently handed down in the Alden family and published by John and Priscilla’s great-great-grandson, Rev. Timothy Alden, in his Collection of American Epitaphs and Inscriptions in 1814 (264-271).”  The picture below of John Alden and Priscilla was found on ancestry with no reference to artist, and is part of the public domain. 

John Alden and wife Priscilla Mullins, Mayflower pilgrims,

We are kin, as cousins to John and Edward Tilley and therefore to their families who came with them aboard the Mayflower as well. John came with his wife Joan Hurst Tilley and their daughter Elizabeth who married John Howland in Plymouth. Edward’s wife, Agnes Cooper might be kin to us separately as well, only more research will tell. Their niece and nephew who came on the Mayflower with them, Humility Cooper and Henry Sampson are also connected to the family.   Because he is my cousin’s grandfather, I am kin to Edward Fuller and his son Samuel, through marriage, thanks to Kay Youngblood Fuller and her husband Jim Fuller. We have a family connection to the Hopkins as well that may turn into direct kinship once thoroughly researched. That is at least 18 of the 102 people aboard the Mayflower that we are related to or connected to by family! That is hard for me to believe, and quite eye-opening! Sometimes I just stand awestruck by history and finally the understanding that historical events were about family, not just events! Those were our ancestors being tossed around on those waves, and our ancestors putting their pen to paper to agree to make their own laws! Good for independent spirits, I’m so proud to be related!

Author: Helen Holshouser

Old enough to enjoy life, I am a Red Hatter, grandmother, gardener, and amateur genealogist. I am a retired clinical psychologist, master's level, who is disabled with heart disease, but having fun with family and friends. Married over 40 years, I have two grown daughters and three grandchildren. I have learned that grandchildren provide a joy one never knew existed---writing feeds my soul, gardening is therapy, and genealogy research makes me feel like a detective!

16 thoughts on “Mayflower Ancestors! Thomas Rogers, John Alden, William Mullins & Allied–52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks, # 51

  1. Good job, Helen. IT is amazing to learn of all the connections. I, too, would have not thought we Virginia girls had a Massachusetts family. Thanks. Anne

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  2. Dear Anne! Thanks for reading and taking time for feedback! I love you dearly. H

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  3. Lovely paintings that Mike allowed you to use.
    I wonder if I will ever get far enough back….

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  4. I am descendant from Francis Eaton. So I guess our family knew each other way back when. Funny how things work out.

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  5. Thank you so much Cathy Meder-Dempsey! You are so much more detailed than me! When you get there you can take it to the bank! Love that we’re in this adventure together! The paintings are gorgeous! I agree! He has a way with light I think Amazing!

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  6. Hi Charles, how interesting! More and more often i am finding ancestors in my family who are in my good friend’s families! Feels like … Reincarnation sometimes. I really wonder! I’ll have to share some stories sometime. I’m relared to some Moores! LOL thanks for sharing this crazy adventure! H

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  7. The spouse is a descendant of George Soule, William Brewster and John Howland, and William Tilley. There was significant shock and surprise at that when I found out. My own family didn’t get here till much later. Sure was a kick to realize who the spouse descended from though.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Dear Aquila, thank you for sharing your story! We must be kin, as i am kin to the Tilleys also! We’ll have to explore that soon!

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  9. How interesting to find all those connections. Yes, the field for choosing partners was pretty small. My ancestor, William Bassett, whom I wrote about extensively in the past couple of months, came on the Fortune–with other passengers whose ship was to sail with the Mayflower but was delayed.

    Just a couple of corrections to your narrative above: The first Thanksgiving in North America was celebrated in Virginia in 1619. (http://vahistorical.wordpress.com/2012/11/20/reasserting-virginias-claim-to-thanksgiving/)

    Pilgrims and Puritans were two separate strains of the people resisting the Church of England. They had different theologies. Puritans settled New England outside of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, but inside the Massachusetts Bay Colony, Pilgrims, along with “strangers”, those people brought along to make their quota of needed workers, held sway. I thought, as you did, the difference related to the fact of those people who arrived in Plymouth, but doing more research, began to see I was wrong.

    It is a subtle thing, but the Pilgrims apparently did not think of their multi-day feast with the indigenous peoples as a Thanksgiving, but rather a Harvest Feast. That term was reserved for days of prayer–not feasting. My source for most of these facts is the terrific website of the Pilgrim Hall Museum. http://www.pilgrimhallmuseum.org or the site of Plimouth Plantation.

    (Don’t know if these links will get my message put in spam, but at least I hope that you are able to see them.)

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  10. Hi Vera, Thank you so very much for taking the time to read and respond to my post! You are the second person who shaed with me that their family came on the Fortune! How interesting! You are so right about both corrections, and I had already taken the word Puritans out of my post, but I know the original , uncorrected version went out first. I am bad about publishing then making correctiosn! Not that I dont’ make corrections before also, they just seem to go on forever.

    The credit for Thankgiving is controversial to say the least. I can site twenty articles that say the honor for the first Thanksgiving belonged to Plymouth, but as a native Virginian I perfer it go to Jamestown! I could and should have done a better job of discussing that issue. Since I am writing about jamestown this week, I will try to address the issue! I have several ideas, some I wish I had said here, we’ll see, I may end up correcting what I said here afterall. I am very appreciative of your feedback! H

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  11. Glad you didn’t resent my nitpicking!
    I should have mentioned that I absolutely love the paintings that you used as an illustration. If the other person who is descended from a Fortune passenger would like to get in touch, I’d love to chat. I have not found a comprehensive passenger list as there is for the Mayflower. There is even doubt about whether William Bassett’s wife Elizabeth was one of the passengers or came over later.

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  12. Hi Vera, not at all, I love the paintings too, the light is fantastic on them! I found the comment on facebook in a group I belong to. I know the lady well enough to see if she will connect with you! I’ve left her a note, so hmm…how about if I give her a link to your blog and let her leave a comment for you. Or if you want to email me your email address, I’ll pass it along to her privately. My email is helenholshouser@gmail.com This is what she said: “My Dad’s family came on the ship Fortune, right behind the Mayflower and were pilgrims….Bompasse family.
    Our Lucy Bumpass was the great, great granddaugher of Eduard Bompasse. He is buried in Plymouth. I am currently working on an application for the “National Society of Sons and Daughters of Pilgrims” that we qualify for being direct descendants of Eduard Bompasse.”

    Small world for sure! She is a real history buff, so you might enjoy each other. Talk soon, Helen

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  13. I love what you’ve done with this blog. Turns out we are related in one way at least… John Alden and Priscilla Mullins are also my 10th great grandparents. My connection is explained here: http://wp.me/P2HCbU-4T

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  14. Thank you tor, both for the compliment, and for realizing our kinship! It always amazes me the different routes to the same grandparents! I can hardly wait to explore more. Now we know we are at least 11th cousins, I suspect we are much closer through the Langhrones!

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  15. I to am related through John Alden and Priscilla Mullins, Thank you for writing such a nice , well documented article. Would you mind if I made a copy for my personal family history book? Its amazing anyone could survive the comditions of the passage, alone all the hardships in a new country. Kate from SD

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  16. Dear Kate, thank you so much for sharing this joy and amazement. Feel free to make a copy, and thank you so much for asking. Hope we’ll talk again! Helen

    Like

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