Heart of a Southern Woman

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Youngblood, James C. 1841-1897, My Great Grand Uncle Is Found! –52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks, #43

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James C Youngblood has been missing ! (Only from my family tree!) I didn’t have him in the list of children born to Jacob and Mariah Charlotte Cooper Youngblood, and now that I have added him, I have only found him in one other family tree in Ancestry.com, which tells us he is not well-known!  Of course, this makes me wonder how many other “children” I might have left out of the large families popular in days gone by! I hate to think of it! My own husband’s great, great-grandfather was left out of  the line of Holshouser children born to his family, and his whole line of Holshousers were not invited to the extended Holshouser reunion for 25+ years, until a wise genealogist “discovered” his line! It can make a huge difference! Because of this personal experience, I have generally tried to be very careful to pick up all the children in a family, and to try to get them in the correct order. It is not easy, and not always possible! Censuses, wills, all help, but they are not panaceas! 

John H. Youngblood, born in Germany in 1780, my third great-grandfather, was our first American immigrant in this family line. He came over and settled in New Jersey, in the town of Frelinghuysen, Warren County.  He married Mary whose maiden name is unknown. We have not been able to trace his parents or his town of origin either. I have them as having only two children, which is very unusual those days. Their children were Jacob Youngblood, 1807-1887, and Elizabeth Youngblood, b. 1810. Elizabeth married one John Case and together they had eleven children. Jacob Youngblood, her brother, from whom I descend, married Mariah Charlotte Cooper and they had six children it now seems. Their six children included:  

We have a Youngblood family group on facebook where we share pictures and discuss all kinds of things including dna and genealogy. It is helping us get to know cousins far and wide. Almost everyone in our group at this point, is a descendant of Lewis Jacob Youngblood above. Recently, I found the gravestone of Jacob Youngblood and his wife Mariah on Billion Graves.  I could plainly see that there were two other names on the stone, and planned to figure out what it said, and who they were, but I was so excited, I went ahead and placed the picture on Facebook in our family group! It was then that my eagle-eyed cousin, Kay Youngblood Fuller, immediately called my attention to it, asking “Just who is that James C. Youngblood whose name is on the stone? ”  I was like, ” Hmm…I don’t know! ” I had assumed it was a child of his, but when I checked his family, there was no James C!  The interesting thing is, Kay Youngblood Fuller’s  father was James Cooper Youngblood b. 1917. and her grandfather was James Cooper Youngblood, b. 1875!! They were both children of Lewis Jacob Youngblood b. 1846–the brother of this James C. Youngblood. Yet, James C. Youngblood was the son of Mariah C. Cooper, where the name came from, did he not have children? We know he married, because his wife is buried with him, it says so on the stone. In fact, it says Jacob died in 1887, his wife Mariah Cooper in 1869, James C. in 1897, and his wife Mary Frances Lawrence in 1908. James C. was 56 years old when he died, yet, he and Mary had one child born in 1880 I believe, named Frank! 

James C. Youngblood ended up being an interesting person to get to know. Part of that is because I was with my cousin Kay Youngblood Fuller, and we researched him together! On his US Civil War Draft Registration Records, available on ancestry.com, we find James C. listed as a “law student” at age 22 in 1863.  According to the U.S. Civil War Soldier Records and Profiles, James C. Youngblood enlisted in Company E, New Jersey 1st Infantry Regiment on 27 June, 1863. It says he mustered out on 24 July 1863, at Trenton, NJ. This is available on Ancestry.com, provided by the register of Officers and Men of New Jersey in the Civil War, 1861-1865. One Month! Only one month? Good job if you can get it! I’ll have to see if I can find out more about this in further research. 

On the 1880 Census, James C. is listed as a lawyer,  is living with his wife Mary Frances Lawrence, at 356 Madison Street, Morris, New Jersey,  and they have  a 3 month old son named Frank!  Also living with them is his mother-in-law Hannah Lawrence,  his own sister Hattie Youngblood, age 21, and a cook named Rosa McDonald. I assumed Frank was the child of Mary Frances Lawrence and James C. Youngblood, but look beside his name on this census. It looks to me like it sas “McD son”–is he the son of James C. Youngblood and his cook, Rose McDonald? ! I did try tracking Rose McDonald, and on the 1920 census she has a son named Frank McDonald. However, our Frank has married, divorced  and moved to Michigan by 1920. 

Youngblood, James C. 1880 census

 Of course, all the 1890 censuses burned, and James C. died in 1897, so what happened to Frank? We find Frank alive and well, living with Mary Lawrence  at the age of 20 on the 1900 census!  In 1910, we find Frank in Philadelphia, working as a mechanical engineer, and living as a boarder with the Westbrook family, by then his Margaret Lawrence  had also died. 

I did find a passport for Frank. Here we learn that his full name is  Francis (Frank) James Youngblood. Apparently  named for both his mother and his father. He was born March 14, 1880, in NJ, and has Hazel eyes, an oval face, and dark brown hair.  He is living in Boston at this time, 1909, and he is 29 years old!

Youngblood, Frank, passport

 

 In 1918, we find a  Draft Registration Card for WWI in the US for one Frank J. Youngblood. His nearest relative is listed as Lina May Youngblood. (Thanks to Aquilla and Cathy Meder Dempsey for their help deciphering this.)  They are living in Philadelphia.  I found  later records , one listing a Francis J. Youngblood married to a Lina May in 1920. Another lists a Frank J. Youngblood with a sister named Lina May! Amazing! I have come to believe that this Registration Card is not even for our Frank! By 1920 he was divorced from Lillian May (very close!) but living in Wayne Michigan! Its so confusing! This is when you have to remember that all research is a process, as you gather and sort information. I would have just left this out entirely, but in my first post, before I corrected it, I had asked for help,a nd I appreciate those who responded, greatly! We shall see where all this leads. 

Youngblood, Frank, Draft Registration Card for WW1

 On the 1920 census, we find Frank working as the automotive mechanical engineer he is, in an automobile factory in Michigan! But how sad, he is divorced! A bit more research comes up with a marriage certificate to one Lillian May Shallow in 1910, with a divorce from her in 1912. As far as I can tell, they did not have children. On the 1930 census Frank still lives in a hotel in Wayne, Michigan, alone, and still works as an automotive, mechanical engineer.   James died in 1934, at the age of 54, in Essex, Ontario, Canada. It appears he had traveled there on business and had only been in the country 4 days according to his death certificate. A friend was the informant, and did get his father correct, his place and year of birth and other things. He died of tuberculosis, which it says he’d had for 3  years! I am shocked that he was allowed to continue working, and to travel between the US and Canada! How sad to have the line end this way. Obviously Frank and his Father James C. were intelligent and talented, one a lawyer, and one a mechanical engineer. It’s sad that he did not have children for us to get to know! 

Author: Helen Holshouser

Old enough to enjoy life, I am a Red Hatter, grandmother, gardener, and amateur genealogist. I am a retired clinical psychologist, master's level, who is disabled with heart disease, but having fun with family and friends. Married over 40 years, I have two grown daughters and three grandchildren. I have learned that grandchildren provide a joy one never knew existed---writing feeds my soul, gardening is therapy, and genealogy research makes me feel like a detective!

7 thoughts on “Youngblood, James C. 1841-1897, My Great Grand Uncle Is Found! –52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks, #43

  1. The name on the draft registration for Nearest Relative is Lena May Youngblood. If you look at the address for Permanent Home Address the S in “St” is markedly different than the beginning letter of his Nearest Relative’s name. The middle name is “May” the first letter is the same as the March in the date of birth. Don’t know that it helps you any, but that’s my read (well magnified), and I’ve been able to figure out some really horrible handwriting (my mom’s was ghastly).

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  2. Also found the index version of the 1920 US Census. It has Lina D (which I think is a misreading) Youngblood with her husband Francis Youngblood – both 29 and living in Philadelphia, PA on FamilySearch.org (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MXML-1PG). Hope that’s some help.

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  3. Wow! Thank you so much Aquilla! You are wonderful! I usually check familysearch.org, thanks for the reminder! I’ll look at these again!

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  4. Good work Helen. I was going to say the same as Aquilla for the name of the wife on the draft card.

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  5. Thank you Cathy Meder- Dempsey! I can see that now, but could not before! Wouldn’t it be nice if we always had extra eyes! I always appreciate your support.

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  6. I was researching the home that I live in, and came across a Deed to a James Youngblood who purchased land in Morristown NJ June 25th 1872. His middle initial isn’t so clear in the copy I have, I will need to go to the county records to see what it really says.

    There are still Youngbloods here in Morristown, I’m not related.

    I googled senator youngblood morristown nj

    I then found several things including this, his obituary
    “Mr James C Youngblood one of the moat prominent lawyers and Republican politicians of Morris county died at his home in Morristown March 21 after a lingering illness. Senator Youngblood was born in Morris town on November 25 1840…” More at

    https://books.google.com/books?id=93ZKAAAAYAAJ&lpg=PA123&ots=ZCgliNtNAz&dq=senator%20youngblood%20morristown%20nj&pg=PA123#v=onepage&q=senator%20youngblood%20morristown%20nj&f=false

    I googled census youngblood morristown nj and it brought me to you.

    Feel free to contact me via email, and I can send you a copy of the Deed from the County records.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Dear Chuck, how wonderful to hear from you! I will email you asap! Thank you so much!

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