Heart of a Southern Woman

A snapshot of life one blog post at a time.

Popular Books and my Royal Ancestors–Elizabeth Woodville,Queen of England, Jacquetta de Luxembourg, and Margaret Beaufort– 52 Ancestors in 52 weeks–16

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Westmenster Abbey

Westmenster Abbey

I remember when I first found “the Royals” in my family tree–in my direct line!  I was so excited! I knew my daughters and sister would be happy about it–after all, they grew up on Disney Princesses and now they were kin to real queens and kings! Then, just in the last week, I heard a friend talking about how much she liked Philippa Gregory’s books about Elizabeth Woodville, Margaret Beaufort, and Jacquetta de Luxembourg! Well, I recognized those names, so I sat up and paid attention. As it turns out, Philippa Gregory writes historical fiction, and several of her books have been turned into movies.  One of her series is about “The Cousins’ War–the war of the Roses in real life! A wonderfully succinct article in Wikipedia tells us about this series:

The Cousins’ War Series

  1. The White Queen (2009) – The story of Elizabeth Woodville, the queen consort of King Edward IV of England and mother of Edward V.
  2. The Red Queen (2010) – The story of Lady Margaret Beaufort and her quest to place her son Henry Tudor on the English throne.
  3. The Lady of the Rivers (2011) – The story of Jacquetta of Luxembourg, the mother of Elizabeth Woodville.
  4. The Kingmaker’s Daughter (2012) – The story of Anne Neville, daughter of Warwick “the Kingmaker” and wife of Edward of Westminster, Prince of Wales, and later of Richard III of England, and of Anne’s elder sister Isabel Neville, wife of George Duke of Clarence
  5. The White Princess (2013) – The story of Elizabeth of York, daughter of Elizabeth Woodville and Edward IV. Wife of Henry VII and mother of Henry VIII of England.

(Also, The King’s Curse, formerly known as The Last Rose (TBA) – Margaret Pole, Countess of Salisbury)

The chronological order of the books is

  • The Lady of the Rivers
  • The White Queen
  • The Red Queen
  • The Kingmaker’s Daughter
  • The White Princess
  • The King’s Curse (not yet released)”

The Lady of the RiversI checked our family tree, and sure enough, Jacquetta de Luxembourg, Duchess of Bedford, is my 17th great-grandmother! This descendancy chart shows the relationship for me and all my Langhorne cousins of my generation.

Jacquetta of Luxembourg

 

Jacquetta “Duchess of Bedford” Luxembourg (1416 – 1472)-updated March, 2017.

is your 17th great-grandmother

 Jacquetta Wydeville (1444-1479)

daughter of Jacquetta “Duchess of Bedford” Luxembourg

Joan Strange (1463 – 1514)

daughter of Jacquetta Wydeville

Jane Stanley (1485 – 1557)

daughter of Joan Strange

Edmund Sheffield, 1st Baron Sheffield (1521 – 1549)

son of Jane Stanley

Eleanor Sheffield (1538 – 1595)

daughter of Edmund Sheffield, 1st Baron Sheffield

John 1st Earl of Clare, Holles (1564 – 1636)

son of Eleanor Sheffield

Robert Hollis (1590 – )

son of John 1st Earl of Clare, Holles

Susanna Hollis (1613 – 1681)

daughter of Robert Hollis

Maj. Robert Beverley Sr. (1641 – 1687)

son of Susanna Hollis

Mary Beverley (1678 – )

daughter of Maj. Robert Beverley Sr.

Mary Rice (1683-1798)

daughter of Mary Beverley

Maj. William Langhorne (1721 – 1797)

son of Mary Beverley

Maj. John Scarsbrook Langhorne (1760 – 1797)

son of Maj. William Langhorne

Henry Scarsbrook Langhorne (1790 – 1854)

son of Maj. John Scarsbrook Langhorne

James Steptoe (blind) Langhorne (1822 – 1905)

son of Henry Scarsbrook Langhorne

Evaline (going blind when died young)) Langhorne (1866 – 1900)

daughter of James Steptoe (blind) Langhorne

Katherine Steptoe Houchins (1883 – 1943)

daughter of Evaline (going blind when died young)) Langhorne

Margaret Steptoe Kerse (1918 – 1980)

daughter of Katherine Steptoe Houchins

Helen Spear Youngblood

You are the daughter of Margaret Steptoe Kerse

 

 

Woodville, Elizabeth, Queen of England

Elizabeth Woodville, Queen of England, portrait ownership unknown

The White Queen–Jacquetta’s daughter Elizabeth Woodville, (1437-1492) became the Queen of England when she married King Edward IV of the Plantagenets. In Philippa Gregory’s work, Elizabeth is portrayed as the White Queen.   In real life, she was my 17th Great Grand Aunt!  Her mother , Jacquetta , Duchess of Bedford, Luxembourg (1416-1472) being my 17th great grandmother.  I descend through Elizabeth’s sister, Jacquetta Wydeville, (1444-1479)who is my 16yh great grandmother.

Queen of England Elizabeth Woodville (1437 – 1492)-updated, March, 2017
is your 17th great grand aunt
mother of Queen of England Elizabeth Woodville
Jacquetta Wydeville (1444-1479)
daughter of Jacquetta “Duchess of Bedford” Luxembourg
daughter of Jacquetta Wydville
daughter of Joan Strange
son of Jane Stanley
daughter of Edmund Sheffield, 1st Baron Sheffield
son of Eleanor Sheffield
son of John 1st Earl of Clare, Holles
daughter of Robert Hollis
son of Susanna Hollis
daughter of Maj. Robert Beverley Sr.
Mary Rice (1683-1798)
daughter of Mary Beverley
son of Mary Rice
daughter of Col. Maurice Scarsbrooke Langhorne
son of Elizabeth Langhorne
son of Henry Scarsbrook Langhorne
daughter of James Steptoe (blind) Langhorne
daughter of Evaline (going blind when died young)) Langhorne
daughter of Katherine Steptoe Houchins
You are the daughter of Margaret Steptoe Kerse
 As of this update of March, 2017, I am no longer  blood related to the Red Queen, Margaret Beaufort, 1443-1509.  She is somply one of the wives of my  16th great grandfather, Thomas Stanley, 1435-1504.  This change occured when we dropped the Welsh descendancy of our Langhornes.  However, the family “connection” still stands. 
The White Princess is identified as  Queen of England, Elizabeth York Plantagenet, 1456-1503.  She is now  my first cousin  17 times removed.   She is the daughter of  the White Queen, Queen of Enland Elizabeth Woodville, and the granddaughter of the Lady of the Rivers,  Jacquetta of Luxembourg. How interesting to actually be part of this family1  
However, as exciting as this is, and yes, I did buy the books, there are some major controversies about these descendancy charts which might render them historical fiction themselves! How sad would that be! First of all, John Perrott has been reported as an illegitimate son of King Henry VIII in a great deal of history. It is reported that even King Henry VIII recognized him as his son, educated him and provided for him. If that is true, then our descendancy is true, and our DNA would match, if we had some DNA from that line, I am looking into that. Recently, several authors have come along to say this is not true, but their ‘evidence’ seems all circumstantial to me.
It feels the same for another controversy that I just learned about this past week! For all these years, in most historical works, researchers have believed and accepted that Mary Beverley, b. 1678 in Jamestown, Virginia, married John Langhorne. However,  it is now believed that  Mary Beverley’s daughter, Mary Rice was the true wife of John Langhorne. There are four sons named William Beverly  Langhorne in this family line, why would that  be except to honor and carry on the Beverly name? I may be wrong but I have not been able to identify a single child or grandchild carrying the name Rice!  However, there is a court case–better explained by this article available at http://www.geni.com/people/Mary-Langhorne/6000000012953341622  

“Controversy about Mary Beverley as wife of John Langhorne

About Mary Langhorne (Beverley)

General Notes: There is great controversy over the identity of John Langhorne’s wife. Most agree that she is a “Mary” but the agreement ends there.
1. Support for the name, “Mary Rice”:

During October 1736 in a case before the court in Warwick County (?), Virginia (Sir John Randolph’s reports, Vol 1, 1725-1745, case R109 by Randolph, B53 by Barrandall (whatever all of that means)) John Langhorne was a defendant in Jones vs Langhorne. The action was to recover the possession of slaves belonging to the estate of Mary Rice. Mary Rice was married to a Myers with four children and the suggestion is that Myers died and she remarried to John Langhorne.

Circumstantially, the Rice family have a history in Warwick County, Virginia, apparently close to the Langhornes living at “Gambell”.
2. Support for the name “Mary Beverley”.

The first son of Maurice Langhorne 1719 was William Beverley Langhorne born about 1790, suggesting a relationship with the Beverley family. According to David Hackett Fischer in his book on the sociology of colonial America, “Albion’s Seeds”, he says naming practices were such that the first-born son would often (but not always) be named after a grandfather (either one), provided he was reputable, and the first son would also carry the maiden name of his mother as a middle name, considered an honor to her. Note that William Beverley Langhorne is the name of Maurice Langhorne’s first-born son. A clue, not evidence. (Second or third son gets dad’s name). The second son was named Maurice Cary Langhorne. This would seem to indicate that this family followed the rules more often than not.

Thomas Litten in his article on the Langhorne family claims that Mary Beverley is the name of John’s spouse. (see notes under John Langhorne – this family)”

In my opinion, this is not proof that Mary Rice is my 6th great-grandmother instead of Mary Beverley! I will stick with the Beverleys until someone proves it differently! After all, I did take my own autosomal DNA on ancestry.com, and I have many matches, at least 40, to the Beverleys–Mary’s family specifically. Unfortunately, I have a few matches to the Rice family as well, but not necessarily to Mary Rice’s family.  We do not  have  definitive proof either way it seems to me! I’m sure we will have the proof we need sometime in the future, genealogy is always a work in progress, with new information coming to light every day, week, month and year that intelligent people conduct their research. Here’s to the process, hope yours is a great adventure also! If you have had these types of controversies, or if you have read these books,  I’d love to hear about them!  

****Update March 16, 2017: Since publishing this post, continued research has convinced me that indeed, the Langhornes  of our family came from England, not Wales!  Hard to give up tradition!   I have also become convinced that Mary Rice, daughter of Mary Beverley is the true wife of  our original immigrant to America, John Langhorne.  I have changed the above descendancy charts to reflect the most current information.  Research is always a process, with new information being constantly discovered!

Have a great week,Helen

 

Author: Helen Holshouser

Old enough to enjoy life, I am a Red Hatter, grandmother, gardener, and amateur genealogist. I am a retired clinical psychologist, master's level, who is disabled with heart disease, but having fun with family and friends. Married over 40 years, I have two grown daughters and three grandchildren. I have learned that grandchildren provide a joy one never knew existed---writing feeds my soul, gardening is therapy, and genealogy research makes me feel like a detective!

3 thoughts on “Popular Books and my Royal Ancestors–Elizabeth Woodville,Queen of England, Jacquetta de Luxembourg, and Margaret Beaufort– 52 Ancestors in 52 weeks–16

  1. Hi to all, it’s actually a pleasant for me to visit this site, it includes useful
    Information.

    Like

  2. Thanks, you are always welcome! Helen

    Like

  3. Pingback: 52 Ancestors Challenge: Week 16 Recap | No Story Too Small

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