Heart of a Southern Woman

A snapshot of life one blog post at a time.

Childhood Recollections of Our Goat Billy– as told to this author by her Cousin Ron Hogue on his 80th Birthday!

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Ron Hogue

Ron and I met on Ancestry–we have never met in person!  We are fourth cousins through my father’s mother’s line!  (Let me hear you say that five times!) Our mutual interest in genealogy and family history, plus our DNA match sealed the deal, leading to our great friendship! Yesterday, Ron turned 80 years old–or maybe that was 8, a mere child, according to him!  LOL  

We talked via video chatting on Facebook, we are so tech savvy!  LOL  After the “congratulations”, we talked about his sadness over the loss just a few months ago of his beloved wife  Dorie Hogue. Turning eighty didn’t feel as great without his best friend of 62 years!

However, as we talked, Ron shared a phone conversation he’d had earlier in the day with his sister Sue. Ron lives in Wisconsin, Sue is  in Minnesota, and I am in North Carolina!  They had reminisced about their childhood, in a rural area just outside of Park Falls, Wisconsin.  Many of the stories brought our laughter bubbling up from the depths of our souls!

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https://kids.spcaeducation.org.nz/animal-care/goats/freedom-from-pain-injury-or-disease/

We were talking about pets, as he just got a new kitty for his birthday. He recalled that when he was a boy, his family had chickens, dogs, cats, and his especially beloved Billy Goat!  He recalled  tussles with the rooster pecking at him and other family members.  He could clearly describe the fascinating hens  with their red feathers and green feather topknots! But Billy—was his love, and his nemesis!  LOL

 

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Stubborn Goat

Ron recalled that it was his job to put the free-ranging goat back into his cage every night!  Of course, the goat wanted no part of leaving his beloved freedom, so he turned into a stubborn Donkey!  Twelve year-old Ron could be seen wrestling with the goat–determined to “be the boss”, LOL–as he tugged the goat while the goat just dug his front legs in deeper and lowered his head, but never charged our Ron!  LOL

The story I loved however, was when Ron told me that he remembered his grandmother spoiling Billy the Goat as if he were her baby.  Billy would come to a back hall door of the farm house in which they lived.  He’d bleat until Grandma would come to the door to say  “Good Mornin’ Billy!”  Then she would step back, swing the door wide, and Billy would trot right into the house–head held high and a big smile on his face–trotting right through other rooms until he reached the kitchen!  There he stood right in front of the cabinet holding the bread box, and began to bleat loudly again!  Grandma would say “Okay, okay, its coming Billy, be patient!”  LOL  Then she would open the bread box and take out one slice of bread–giving it to the hungry, expectant goat!  Nodding his head in thanks, Billy clamped the bread tight in his mouth, turned, and trotted right back out the back door!  Once outside, he gobbled his tasty morsel and bleated his thanks again as he ran off to play with the other animals!

 

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Wow!  Can’t you see it, can’t you feel the charm, the love, the sense of family and community! What a story! Thanks so much for sharing it with me cousin Ron Hogue!  What a treasure–both you and the story! So glad we both love family and genealogy! 

 

 

 

 

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Family Pictures Found–Unidentified–Part 3

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Youngblood sibs in snow, Gwendolyn, Cecil, Helen, unknown and Fulton

You might want to read the last two posts before reading this one–it might make more sense if you do.   You can find part one here, and part two here.

We are discussing pictures found recently by this author Helen’s sister in Richmond,Virginia. There were about fifty pictures of family members found in a small album never seen by any of the living siblings of this family, all in our  60’s and 70’s now. Only two of the fifty pictures were identified, but thanks to that, and to  other family pictures allowing us to identify  some others, we decided that more than likely, these were pictures that belonged to our Father’s family–his Dad’s German Youngblood family,and his mother’s Scotish Hogue family.

Since I am the active amateur genealogist of the family and family historian, who is also most in touch with other family members, cousins, and DNA matches, through social media groups, etc., I eagerly took pictures of the newfound 100 year-old photographs to work on trying to identify as many as possible.

Who are the most likely family members in these pictures? For that answer, I went to our family tree.  Even  though I include all the parents and siblings, I truly believe most of these pictures come from the family of Edwin Spear Youngblood and his wife Helen Blanche Hogue, which includes my father.

 

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The family of  Robert Fulton Hogue, Sr. b. 1850, with his children and grandchildren.  One of those children is my father’s mother i–Helen Blanche Hogue, child III.

 

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The family of Lewis Jacob Youngblood with his siblings, his children and grandchildren.  My father’s family is shown with  his father Edwin Spear Youngblood as child  #5.

 

With that in mind, I wonder if Edwin Spear Youngblood and /or his wife, Helen Blanch Hogue  Youngblood, my paternal grandparents, are in any of these found pictures!  Two of my cousins wrote to me yesterday to identify Helen B.  –and look–these are known portraits of them that I have on my own living room wall.

 

 

What happens if I compare these to some of the found pictures on the family search compare-a-face site? Yes!  Helen is a match!  

 

Helen Blanche Hogue Youngblood known on left, and unknown

 

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unknown picture to identify, now seen as Helen Blanche Hogue-Youngblood

Here below, is an older, known picture of my paternal grandmother, Helen Blanche Hogue Youngblood that I took myself when I was about age 15! She would have been 84. How does it compare to  the picture of her younger self above?  Wow!  95%! Wow!

 

 

Below is one of the unidentified pictures of a young man–it looks a bit to me like it could be Edwin, could it be?  I’m not at all sure, but look,family search compare-a-face says it is more than likely! What do you think?

 

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Edwin Sear YOungblood compared with younger self maybe

 

Here’s another unknown single young man, is this Edwin Spear also?  

 

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This is so very interesting!  I hope a lot of relatives will stop by to comment and give advice, on ancestry, Facebook, or where ever you find me!  Thanks and happy ancestor hunting!

PS, I think there might have to be one more post—  part 4, and I promise to stop then!  LOL Well…maybe. 

 

 

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Family Pictures Found, Part 2–Who Are They? Ideas for Figuring That Out

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This is a continuation of the last post, entitled Family Pictures Found–Unidentified! You can read it here– Family Pictures Found–Unidentified!  

Since getting that treasure trove of unidentified family pictures, I learned of a new site that might help us with that on familysearch.., specifically at this link: Compare-a-face

You can do several very interesting things at this site! I believe it is designed to compare a picture of you, yourself to your ancestors, to see who you look like.  However, in this case, I wanted to compare some of the unknown family members to known family pictures and see if I could find matches! It worked, or at least gave us clues!  I do want to tell you, whenever you want to  make someone else, other than yourself, the face to be compared to–you must start a new trial.  That means leave the site, then sign back in, and upload a different person from yourself to compare with other pictures.  Now, that may seem complicated, but family search has great instructions on their site, and  you will have no trouble following them!

As I was beginning to learn to use this site, I first used pictures of people whose identity I knew. Let me show you some examples. It was gratifying to see high scores when I compared  known people when they were young and older.  The comparisons are scored in similarity on a 100% (meaning identical) scale.  The best scores I found were like 91% and similarly.  I did find some matches, people I knew, where they were only matched at about 60%.   I learned that those matching in the 20’s and 30%’s were probably NOT matches. Others, higher, warranted more investigation. Let me show you some examples:

The program recognized me– on my wedding day, aged 22, compared to my current 70 year-old self!  Amazing!

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My Mom– Margaret Steptoe Kearse Youngblood, in 1941 and in 1980:

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My Dad:  Cecil Hogue Youngblood, Sr. in 1941 and 1988:

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So, how does this help us identify our unidentified pictures?  Well look!  It’s exciting! The drawback of course, is you have to have a KNOWN photograph of a person in order to compare them with an unknown picture and see if you get a match.  So I did what I could!

The first picture below  is a known picture of my Father’s sister, my Aunt Helen Marie Youngblood  (1907-1978) who married first Edward Riddick Webb, and second George Frederick Combs. In the recent treasure trove of pictures my sister found, two were identified, the second one below is one of those, and was identified as this same woman– my Aunt Helen Marie Youngblood, in about 1922 which would make her about 15 years old when standing with her horse on the family farm in  Colonial Heights, Virginia.

Helen Marie Youngblood, abt. 18 years old    Helen Marie Youngblood

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This picture on the right was one of the unidentified.  Because of the snow, the website Compare- a -Face will not use this photo.  However, if you compare it to the one with Aunt Helen Marie Youngblood (1907-1978) and her horse above, it seems like a definite match to me!  What do you think?   Then look below where the website compared two known pictures of Helen Marie Youngblood (1907-1978) and they say yes,they are a match! 

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Now look, this helped me find the identify of some of the unknown pictures! I started by uploading to the familysearch, Compare- a -Face site a known picture of Aunt Helen,.  Next I compared at least two other pictures from the album of unidentified pictures, ones that a cousin guessed might be her. Yes!

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I wondered if this pic above  might be my Aunts Gwendolyn (l) and Helen (r) Youngblood, sisters of my father.

My cousin Tracy Pender told me that she believed the woman in the front row of this picture below, third from the left, was also my Aunt Helen Marie Youngblood–her Great-Grandmother. I could see the family resemblance. Just look at the original picture, then the comparison with a known picture of Helen Marie Youngblood!  They match at 83%–it must be her!

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Do you see the picture above of two ladies in coats and hats–the one I labeled as possibly being my Aunts–sisters–Gwendolyn and Helen Youngblood?  Well, from my experience, a 72% match between a known picture of my Aunt Helen and the shorter lady, proves that she is indeed my Aunt Helen!

My Aunt Gwendolyn was always tall and slim.  I guessed that was her with her sister Helen in the picture of the ladies in coats and hats.  I found a couple of pictures that I knew were Aunt Gwendolyn and used those to compare.  Here are two KNOWN pictures of Gwendolyn compared: (only 59%?)

Gwendolyn Youngblood Tucker young and older

 

Now below is one known picture of Aunt Gwendolyn compared to the tall, slim woman in the coat and hat with  who we decided was her sister Helen Marie Youngblood: (only 34%!  That’s crazy!  I can’t imagine who else this might be!)

 

Gwendolyn to young Gwendolyn

 

And …below is the same known picture of Aunt Gwendolyn Youngblood Tucker compared to a different one of the unknown pictures that several of us thought surely must be Aunt Gwendolyn when she was young–she was so attractive, tall ,slim and fun!  But no–the Compare a – Face says known Aunt Gwendolyn and this pretty lady are only a 26% match!  Below that is the two unknown, but guessed Aunt Gwendolyn pictures compare at 91% –so they are the same person for sure, but perhaps not Aunt Gwendolyn!   Wow!  

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Unknown picture, thought to be Blanche Gwendolyn Youngblood (1915-2004)

 

 

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With all these comparisons, what conclusions can we safely draw? 

I believe that so far, considering the pictures examined in this one blog post, the only positive conclusion we can draw is that the shorter lady on the right in this unidentified picture of the tow  women in coats and hats, is certainly Helen Marie Youngblood Webb Combs! This is a lot of work!  More in the next blog post.

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Family Pictures Found–Unidentified!

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Youngblood sibs in snow, Gwendolyn, Cecil, Helen, unknown and Fulton

A recently discovered family picture with  no one identified. We are working to identify  these people!

Family pictures and portraits–don’t you love them!?  A couple weeks ago, my sister found a small album, about 3″ x 5″, full of old family pictures! The picture above is one of those pictures!  I love that picture, but who are those folks?!    What a treasure!  There were maybe 50 pictures–but only two were actually labeled as to who was in the picture!  Now my sister and I are in our 70’s—born in the 1940’s, as was my older brother.  Our younger brother was not born until 1955.  These pictures look like they were mostly taken in the early 1920’s!  Some people looked familiar, but we are just guessing! A treasure and a puzzle!

Our Mom died in 1980, Dad in 1988.  After Dad died we cleared out the house that had been ours for 60 years, and sold it. Items were divided among several family members, including pictures.  We thought we had accounted for them all.  My sister found this little album of pictures in a box of papers, that we may never have gone through except in a cursory manner. We were shocked!  It may have even been my grandmother’s, my paternal grandmother lived with us until she died when I was about 15, in 1964. Her name was Helen Blanche Hogue, and she had married my paternal grandfather, Edwin Spear Youngblood–I was lucky enough to inherit portraits of both of them, my namesakes. Looking through the pictures, my brother Cecil thought he recognized several, and with the two labeled, we realized they were probably all  either Hogue or Youngblood family members. All I had to do was look at who was living in the 1920’s–ha!–and maybe find the matches!

 

The two pictures that were labeled on the back, are shown below.  The first is my Great Grandfather Robert Fulton Hogue, with his son, Robert Fulton Hogue Jr. b. 1921–called “Bobby”–that is what it says on the back of the picture;   (and yes, he was 70 years old when he fathered Bobby)  Since the child in the  picture was born in 1921, we figure it must be about 1922 when that picture was taken–his father died in 1924.

Robert Fulton Hogue, 1850-1924 with son Robert Fulton Hogue, Jr, called Bobby, 1921-child of third wife, Maude Hooten

Robert Fulton Hogue, 1850-1924, ahown age 71 with 2 year-old son Bobby Jr.

 

Below is the other picture that was labeled.  It says this picture is of my father’s sister, Helen Marie Youngblood, 1907-1978,  who married first  Edward Riddick Webb, and second George Combs. She is pictured below with her horse.  Robert Fulton Hogue is her maternal grandfather. It looks like this picture could have been taken also in 1922, like the other, as she would be 15, about  how she looks.

Helen Marie Youngblood

 

Here are some of the others, and I do not yet know who they are! They are not in any particular order! I am working on it!

 

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 Here are eleven unidentified pictures of family members!  Now what should we do? And there are many more!  Really great pictures!  I think I will lay them all out here this time, in hopes that someone  might just see them and identify them!  In the next couple of posts, I will begin to work on them myself and see if  you agree! Come back, I need your help! I have also found a photo-comparison site that you  and I might find useful!

 

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In the next post I’ll share some ways that we have begun to identify some of these folks.  If anyone reading this blog thinks they can identify any of these people, please let me know! Helen

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The James River of Virginia, Flows Through My Family’s Life–from Jamestown to Present Day

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James River near the Huguenot Bridge, Richmond,Virginia. Photo by Betty S. Conner, with permission.

In the last few days, I had the joy of visiting my home town of Richmond, Virginia.  A couple of friends from my youth, Betty S. Conner and Karen Bonner Allen, took me on a tour of our old neighborhoods which included a leisurely roll by the James River–a river that ran through our neighborhoods, our city, and our state. As I gazed at the river, reminiscing with friends, memories swelled within me of all the lifetime moments–adventures, joys and sorrows associated with that beautiful river!

Upon returning home and sharing these thoughts with others, a cousin reminded me of how prominently the James River had featured in the life of our family since the inception of  our country and the Colony of Jamestown!   Wow!  I had not thought of it that way…suddenly my thoughts expanded and encompassed  not only my own life, my immediate family’s life, but my  grandparent’s, my 3rd Great-Grandparents, and all the way back to, yes—the 1650’s when my 8th Great-Grandfather John Langhorne (1642 -1687) born in England, sailed to Virginia. There on the James River he established the Gambell Plantation, east of the Colony of Jamestown.  I grew up on that same James River–only about 60 miles west of the plantation settled by John Langhorne.

 

This article from Wikipedia gives a great description of the size and scope of the James River:  “The James River is a river in the U.S. state of Virginia that begins in the Appalachian Mountains and flows 348 miles (560 km)[3] to Chesapeake Bay…. It is the longest river in Virginia and the 12th longest river in the United States that remains entirely within a single state. Jamestown and Williamsburg, Virginia’s first colonial capitals, and Richmond, Virginia’s current capital, lie on the James River.”–https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_River

Developing a timeline helped me think about and realize the true scope of the James River’s importance to and influence on my mother’s ancestral family, the Langhornes especially. Our historian cousin, Betty Smith shared her knowledge and insight as to the importance the river served in our family. (read more in former blog post:  https://heart2heartstories.com/2014/12/30/jamestowne-colony-ancestors-20-grandparents-including-capt-christopher-newport-52-ancestors-in-52-wee )

1607: 

Jamestown in the Virginia Colony was founded.  My 9th Great-Grandfather, Capt. Christopher Newport, (1561–1617)  “was an English seaman and privateer. He is best known as the captain of the Susan Constant, the largest of three ships which carried settlers for the Virginia Company in 1607 on the way to found the settlement at Jamestown in the Virginia Colony, which became the first permanent English settlement in North America. He was also in overall command of the other two ships on that initial voyage, in order of their size, the Godspeed and the Discovery.” –https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christopher_Newport

 

1666:

John Langhorne, 1642-1687, my 8th Great-Grandfather and our first immigrant to America in the Langhorne family, settled in Warwick County, Virginia in 1666 with his wife, the former Rebecca Carter of Bristol, England. The family home was known as “Gambell” and overlooked the James River from a plantation of 2,000 acres. (for more reading see blog post re. John Langhorne of Gambell:  https://heart2heartstories.com/2014/07/22/john-langhorne-arrives-in-the-royal-colony-of-virginia-about-1666-and-his-descendants-reunion-next-week-)

 

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–map included in The Virginia Langhornes by James C. Langhorne, 2013, Blackwell Press, Lynchburg, Virginia

1790:

Gambell remained the family home for over 100 years in our direct line bringing us to my third Great-Grandfather, Henry Scarsbrooke Langhorne (1790-1854) born at Gambell on the James River.

 

1831:

As the planting of tobacco was no longer as profitable as it had once been, Henry S. Langhorne and his wife Frances Callaway Steptoe (1798-1832) my 3rd Great-Grandparents, moved to Lynchburg, where he established the second largest milling venture in Virginia at that time. Betty Smith shared with us that Langhorne Mills in Lynchburg,  was also known as the Lynchburg Milling Company. It was started in 1831 by brothers Maurice and Henry S. Langhorne, but after a few years, Henry bought out his brother’s share. In the mill they produced different kinds of flour.

Henry never abandoned planting though, and continued to buy numerous plantations in Bedford, Campbell and Amherst Counties. His 13,000 acre plantation located in Patrick County, Virginia was inherited by his son James Steptoe Langhorne, (1822-1905), my  2nd Great-Grandfather.   In 1845, Henry retired and relocated to “Cloverdale”, a 3,500-acre Botetourt County plantation.    Another invaluable source for family history is the book, The Virginia Langhornes, by  my cousin, James Callaway Langhorne, published in 2013 by Blackwell Press in Lynchburg, Virginia–and of course, my cousin himself.

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Langhorne Mills in Lynchburg, Virginia, also known as the Lynchburg Milling Company. from Flickr.com

1860-1905:

Henry’s eldest son John Scarsbrook Langhorne (1817-1886) married Sarah Elizabeth Dabney of Edgemont plantation, a great-granddaughter of William Randolph II of Chatesworth plantation.  John inherited Langhorne Mills, along with the bulk of his father’s estate. John was the grandfather of Lady Astor, Nancy Langhorne. (see former blog post: https://heart2heartstories.com/2014/04/28/nancy-witcher-lady-astor-langhorne-52-ancestors-in-52-weeks-17/

The mill produced specialized flours and shipped their products and tobacco down the James River to markets in Richmond and below, in specially designed, flat bottomed, shallow-drafted Bateau boats. Today, Virginians celebrate the history of the Bateau boats with a festival on the James River every year, which several family members attend.

Betty Smith shares that during the Civil War, Lynchburg had  only one battle with the Union, an attack led by Maj. Gen. David Hunter and his soldiers destroyed the mill’s supplies, the  boats, and tore up what few railroad lines existed.  Hunter’s attempt to capture the city was defeated by forces under the leadership of Lt. Gen. Jubal Anderson Early, my 3rd cousin, 3x removed.  The current mill owner, John Langhorne (1817-1886) and his family used the mill for a hospital for Confederate soldiers.

1920-1940:

Fifteen years later, my grandmother Katherine Steptoe Houchins Kearse,  child of Evelyn Langhorne, is sailing the James River with her husband in their boat, “The Lady Jane”. Tragically, their only son of seven children, Thomas Philip Kearse, Jr. drowned in the James River at age 8, in 1922. My mother and aunts talked of “The Lady Jane” and their adventures often and lovingly.  You can read more about  “The Lady Jane” in this former blog post: https://heart2heartstories.com/2014/03/03/thomas-philip-kerse-captains-the-lady-jane-52-ancestors-in-52-weeks/

 

The Lady Jane sails the James River near Richmond, Virginia.  Personal Photo library of Helen Y. Holshouser. The boat belonged to  her grandfather Thomas Phillip Kearse.

 

2019:

Another 70 years and I have grown up on the James River, along with cousins, brothers, sister and friends– boating, swimming, fishing, and just nourishing our souls — connecting with ancestors who arrived in Jamestown Colony on the James River in Virginia! No wonder the river speaks to me –it flows through my DNA and is imprinted on my soul!

–About a 350-year span of lifetimes—–ALL INVOLVED WITH OR DEPENDENT UPON THE JAMES RIVER ❤️

 

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Uncle Langhorne killed cousin Charles Edie? Shock!

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                        langhjorne-and-edie-murder-at-hampden-sydney

There was a murder–162 years ago– January 27, 1857, at a private, all- male college in Virginia– Hampden Sydney College.   I had never heard of the event until three days ago.  I traveled to my sister’s home, in Richmond, Virginia–er husband and son attended Hampden Suydney.  She showed me an alumni magazine with this story featured on  the cover!  Since the man who was accused of murder was one Edward “Ned” Alexander Langhorne, we were all interested in discovering whether or not he was related to us. (the Langhorne family is on my mother’s side of the family.)

When I got home, I researched  him with the help of my daughter Annie Holshouser.  What a surprise to learn that  he was a fairly close family member–he was my 3rd great Uncle, actually a half- Uncle on my mother’s side of the family. . Sadly, the other Hampden Sydney student he murdered was his best friend!  How tragic, they were only 18, both lives ruined!  The student who died was named Charles Taylor Edie–I thought to myself, “Edie sounds familiar…oh my  gracious–suppose he is related to us also? ”  And of course, he is–a 2nd cousin five times removed, on my Father’s side of the family!  Oh my gracious, oh my gracious! 

The story goes that on the morning of January 27, 1857, Ned went to confront his “best friend” Charles over his behavior towards a young woman and Ned himself, the night before.  It is said that Charles had been drinking heavily the night before. It is also said that Charles was stronger, bigger and tougher than Ned, so Ned’s other friends had encouraged him to carry a weapon in case he needed to protect himself, if he was to confront the fearsome Charles–his BEST FRIEND!  But Ned was a “gentleman”, who could not disobey the “Honor Code” which demanded a duel in response to such humiliation as Charles had dished out to him. So…Ned carries a borrowed knife and a pistol to go and confront his friend!  Really? There are many details to this story…I will tell you where you can read them for yourself!  It is quite a story!

Of course, hungover college boys are dangerous when tempers flare and friends egg you on! Can’t  you hear the  the chants…”fight, fight!” Fight they did, punching, kicking and finally–stabbing–right through the heart the knife went!  The life of Charles Edie,  age 18, was ended by Edward Langhorne!

Ned was arrested of course and placed in jail! His trial took place on March 13, 1857.  Many people testified on his behalf, although many , including ministers in the community denounced him and the Honor Code of Dueling!  In his book, The Virginia Langhornes, 2013, Blackwell Press, Lynchburg, Virginia, pg. 210, author James Callaway Langhorne gives this great description: Ned’s “subsequent murder trial was one of the great legal spectacles of antebellum Virginia. Although he was acquitted to “such cheering that the judge had to clear the courtroom in order to restore order and discharge the jury,” the incident colored the remainder of his short life!”

Let me tell you a bit about both of  these “boys”. Charles Edie, was born in 1838, in Christiansburg, Montgomery County, Virginia, USA.  His parents were Dr. Joseph Speers Edie, M.D. who had previously taught at Hamden Sydney, and later anguished between earning his doctorate of divinity as he felt called to the ministry, or getting a medical degree as he also felt strongly called to heal.  He was the local doctor in town for many years! His reputation was that of a very kind man who served rich and poor with equal care and talent.   Charles’s mother was Elizabeth Randolph White Edie, of the famous Virginia Randolph family!  Can you imagine dedicating your life to healing others, but not being available to help your mortally wounded child!  What a nightmare!   

Edward “Ned” Alexander Langhorne was born in 1837, the son of wealthy planter, miller, business tycoon and owner of multiple plantations throughout Virginia and other states–my third great-grandfather, Henry Scarsbrook Langhorne, 1790-1854.  Henry was married twice and Edward is the son of him and his second wife, Ann Eliza Scott.  My family descends from Henry and his first wife, Frances Callaway Steptoe through his son James Steptoe Langhorne, 1822, called “Grandpa Steptoe” and his wife Elizabeth Rachel Omohundro. Also descending from sons of Henry and Frances is the famous  Nancy Langhorne, Lady Astor, from her father Chiswell to his father John to Henry. (Sadly, we missed out on the wealth genes! LOL)

Now let’s look at some other family relationships/issues for a minute–and think about the warnings we’ve heard of cousins marrying and unlucky numbers, LOL Was Ned doomed to problems?  His parents were first cousins, oh dear.  He was one of 13 children!  Oh dear!  Then what…he married his own first cousin!  (“Lions Tigers and Bears, oh my!”)  What else could befall him… accused of murder…war…disease?  Wow!  Yes!  He went in service for the Civil War, and as a First Lieutenant for Company F, 28th Virginia Infantry, Confederate States of America, he fought at First Manasas, but died of Typhoid Fever on Christmas Day, 1861–three years after killing his “best friend”. He left behind a wife and two very small children!

How sad for two young men–and many more!

Above is a picture of a book by William E. Thompson on this “fatal affair”. 

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Hampden Sydney Colege–now and then.

 

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Genealogical Ties to Two Ampthill Plantations in Colonial America Highlights Intermarriages Among First Families

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(this post was first published in “Worldwide Genealogy – A Genealogical Collaboration, 30 Jan. 2018)

 

photo of Amphill Plantation in Chesterfield County, Virginia–from Wikipedia Commons

This is the story of two plantations in Virginia, USA, which were both called Ampthill Plantation at one time.  More so, it is about the discovery of these two homes both still standing in Virginia today, and realizing that the owners and families involved were all wealthy, influential, aristocratic First Families of Virginia and all related at least distantly to this author.  How exciting to.find information like this, facts that breathe life into old homes and broaden our understanding of our ancestors. One of these homes has become a Bed and Breakfast—I can hardly wait to stay in it and experience the very atmosphere of my ancestors! 
While working on my family tree on Ancestry, I had come across a picture of the first Ampthill Plantation built about 1730 in Colonial Virginia by our Great Uncle Henry Cary, 1675-1749.  When I posted the picture on my family tree on Ancestry, a knowledgeable woman named Margaret wrote me a kind note letting me know there were two Ampthill Estates! I was very surprised to learn that there was another Ampthill Plantation House in Virginia, and even more sothat it had also been owned by more of our own family’s ancestors 
 
The Cary’s Ampthill Plantation was originally located in part of the Henricus Settlement of Colonial Virginia, which became Chesterfield County in 1749.  The house was built by Henry Cary Jr. our eighth great –uncle, whose father, Henry Cary, Sr. our 8th Great -Grandfather, was an architect who designed many famous buildings in Colonial Virginia, including the Capital Building at Colonial Williamsburg.  The Cary Ampthill home was inhabited for many years by Henry Jr.’s son, our first cousin and a Revolutionary War hero, Col. Archibald Cary among others of the well-known Cary family.  Later the house was physically relocated into the city of Richmond, Virginia near Cary Street named for the family. As a child growing up in Richmond, Virginia, my mother worked as a realtor in an office on Cary Street.  We often saw this first Ampthill Estate home on our local travels. Unfortunately, at that time we did not know of our kinship.
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This is what Wikipedia says about the Cary Family’s Ampthill Plantation:  
“Ampthill Plantation pictured above) was located in the Virginia Colony in Chesterfield County on the south bank   of the James River about four miles south of the head of navigation at modern-day Richmond, Virginia.[1] Built by Henry Cary, Jr. about 1730, it was just upstream of Falling Creek.[2] It was later owned by Colonel Archibald Cary, who maintained a flour mill complex and iron forge at the nearby town of Warwick.  Mary Randolph was born there in 1762. 
In 1929, Ampthill House, the manor house of Ampthill Plantation, was dismantled, moved to a site on Cary Street Road in the West End of Richmond, and reassembled where it sits today. Although it is not open to the public, Ampthill House is a noteworthy local landmark, and is marked by a Virginia Historical Marker.[4] 
The former plantation property on the James River near Falling Creek is occupied by the Spruance Plant and related industrial complex of the DuPont Company.”—from Wikipedia:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ampthill_(Chesterfield_County,_Virginiahttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ampthill_(Chesterfield_County,_Virginia)
Ampthill Estate in Cartersville, Virginia–from Wikimedia Commons
The second Ampthill Plantation is located in the town of Cartersville, in Cumberland County, Virginia.  I call it the second Ampthill because it wasn’t named Ampthill until the early 1800’s, almost 100 years after the Cary’s Ampthill Estate. However, the land began to be developed about the same time as the first Ampthill—in the early 1700’s.
According to Wikipedia,“Ampthill is a plantation located in Cartersville, Cumberland County, VirginiaUnited States, roughly 45 minutes west of Richmond, and just over an hour south of Charlottesville. The property is listed on both the National Register of Historic Places and the Virginia Landmarks Register.
In 1714 Charles Fleming took on a land patent of 670 acres (2.7 km²) with an intent to cultivate it. The land, however, “lapsed,” and was later granted to Thomas Randolph in 1722. This area was later included in a tract made up of 2870 acres (11.6 km²), which later came to be known as “Clifton.” But it was this initial purchase of the 670 acres (2.7 km²) that would form “The Fork,” known for its position on the James and Willis Rivers. It would later become Ampthill. In 1724, Randolph sold the site to Robert “King” Carter, then the wealthiest landowner in Virginia.
In his will dated 22 August 1726, King Carter willed the 2870 acre (11.6 km²) tract to his then unborn grandson, with the stipulation that the child carry the Carter name. Some time later, Anne Carter and Major Benjamin Harrison of Berkeley Plantation, christened a son, Carter Henry, who later become the owner of the property known as “Clifton,” in Cumberland County, Virginia.
Carter Henry Harrison moved to Clifton upon graduation from law school. There he raised his family and wrote the Cumberland Resolutions, which were presented to the community from the steps of the Effingham Tavern. These resolutions were later incorporated into the Virginia Resolutions, which were the basis for the Declaration of Independence, written by Harrison’s nephew, Thomas Jefferson.
Ampthill
Carter Henry Harrison died in 1793. In his will, Carter Henry willed Clifton to his son, Randolph, and The Fork to his son Robert. Robert sold The Fork to Shadrack Vaughan in 1804. Randolph later repurchased the property in 1815. The Fork was a clapboard structure of no more than three bedrooms. In 1815, the decision was made to add an addition to the existing manor. Randolph called upon his cousin, Thomas Jefferson, to design the brick addition that exists today. These plans exist today on file with the University of Virginia. The addition began its first phases of construction in 1835 and was completed in 1837. The two “houses” were separate for a number of years until a one-story passageway was built to connect the two. After the construction of the brick addition was completed the structure was renamed Ampthill.[3]
It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1972.
In 1998, the property was purchased by George Costen of Charlottesville. Beginning in 1999 and for a number of years that followed, Ampthill went under a major historic restoration.
Ampthill becamebed and breakfast and enjoys the prestige of being the only privately owned Jeffersonian property in Virginia. Her windows are the original glass. Ampthill exists today on 60 acres (240,000 m2) of the original 2870 acres (11.6 km²), is the home to 40 head of cattle and includes the manor house, four outbuildings and the barn, which dates to 1920, by far the youngest standing structure on the property.”  —https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ampthill_(Cumberland_County,_Virginia)
Wow, that is a lot of information, and it looks like the property moved through a lot of different families—however, let’s look a bit more closely through the eyes of a descendant, who is learning through genealogy!  Remember also, I have just learned of this estate, although it belonged to my ancestors, I never knew of it until recently.
Charles Fleming originally owned the land that became the second Ampthill Estate in 1714. The Wikipedia author states that Fleming’s grant lapsed and the land was then given to Thomas Randolph in 1722. However, I wonder if he realized  that Thomas Randolph’s wife was the daughter of Charles Fleming, Judith Churchill Fleming, 1689-1743!  She could not legally own property in Virginia, so I wonder if Charles Fleming willed it to his son-in-law perhaps. Thomas Randolph, 1683-1729 of Virgina, 2nd owner of the 2nd Ampthill, was my family’s ninth cousin. 
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–all family trees are the  personal work and property of Helen Y. Holshouser
 In 1726, only four years after receiving the land, Thomas Randolph sold it to the fifth Governor of Virginia, Robert “King” Carter, my family’s 9th Great Uncle!  Nothing like keeping it in the family! Thomas Randolph died in 1729, so he may have known he was not able to care for the land
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Robert “King” Carter, 1663-1732, Public Domain
Robert “King” Carter’s father, John Carter, was our 9th Great Grandfather. Robert “King” Carter willed the land to his grandson Carter Henry Harrison (our 2nd cousin), through Robert’s daughter Anne Carter (our 1st cousin) and her husband Benjamin Harrison IV, the grandparents of our 9th President of the US, William Henry Harrison! Carter Henry Harrison willed the land to his sons, Robert and Randolph Harrison.  Randolph Harrison (our 3rd cousin 7 times removed) ended up purchasing all of the property by 1815, where two clapboard houses stood, one  named the Clifton and the other The Fork. But wait– who was the wife of Carter Henry Harrison and the mother of Randolph Harrison?  None other than one Susannah Randolph, 1738-1779, our 10th cousin! Yes, she is related to us and is the niece of the original Thomas Randolph who owned the property on which the second Ampthill Estate was built!  Amazingly, she married a second time to Thomas Fleming, the grandson of the original owner of the 2nd Ampthill property, Charles Fleming!  Wow! In fact, Susannah Randolph’s father is Isham Randolph, who is the brother of Thomas Randolph, 1683-1729, the 2nd owner of the 2nd Ampthill. Isham and Thomas Randolph’s  parents were  William Randolph, 1651 of England who immigrated to Virginia, and his wife Mary Royall Isham.  
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That is not all of the important connections for this amazing family—and we haven’t even talked about their many roles in shaping the new country of the United States—but Isham Randolph b. 1685 and his wife Jane L. Rogers had eleven children including Susannah Randolph of course, and they also had her sister Jane Randolph, 1720, who married Peter Jefferson b.1708 and became the parents of our President, Thomas Jefferson, 1743-1826.  As you read above in the article from Wikipedia, Thomas Jefferson designed the second Ampthill Estate for his Uncle, Carter Henry Harrison who was also the Uncle of President William Henry Harrison!  Wow, simply amazing! As the article stated, the Ampthill Estate in Cartersville is the only privately-owned Thomas Jefferson designed home in Virginia and it is now a bed and breakfast! I can hardly wait to visit this home and walk and sleep where my ancestors slept and worked 200-300 years ago! 
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Thomas Jefferson in 1791 at 49 by Charles Willson Peale–Public Domain, Wikipedia 
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William Henry Harrison, Daguerreotype of an oil painting depicting William Henry Harrison, 9th President of the United States. Public Domain, Wikipedia
Albert Sands Southworth (American, 1811–1894) and Josiah Johnson Hawes (American, 1808–1901). Edited by: Fallschirmjäger –The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Accession number: 37.14.44. Search for “William Henry Harrison” on the museum’s site.
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Just to add other amazing discoveries (amazing to me) let’s look at the mother of Susannah Randolph b. 1738, for a minute. Married to Isham Randolph, her name was Jane Lilburnie Rogers, 1692-1760, and she was the 2nd great granddaughter of Thomas “The Pilgrim” Rogers, 1586-1621, who came to Plymouth Colony on the Mayflower! Not only is Thomas Rogers my own tenth great grandfather, he is my husband Max Holshouser’s eleventh great grandfather!  Yes, it makes us distant cousins! 
Other very interesting information about the Randolphs is that my sister Anne is married to Joseph Prince, who is also related to the same Randolph family of Virginia, making them distant cousins like Max and I are. What a small world native Virginians make! 
Through my DNA testing on ancestry, I have discovered other cousins also related to the Randolphs, Carters, Carys, Harrisons and Jeffersons.  One of the DNA cousins I met is Pam Maudsley Cooper, a dear cousin whom I have come to admire greatly, and who lives in Queensland, Australia!   I was born in Virginia, but have lived in the State of North Carolina in America since 1980. Thanks to the internet, Pam and I can work together often on the genealogy we both enjoy and enhance our cousinship! Different continents, but we share13th great grandparents in William Carter, 1475-1521 and his wife Alice Croxton, 1478-1525 of England. Again, I say totally amazing! 
Then there is this information tying the families of the two Ampthill Estates together:  the 3rd owner of the 2nd Ampthill in Cartersville, Virginia was Robert King Carter, fifth Gov. Of Virginia and our ninth great- Uncle, who received the land in 1726He willed the land to his daughter Anne Carter Harrison’s son Carter Henry Harrison—although it was not called Ampthill until 1835.  MeanwhileHenry Cary Jr. built the first Ampthill Plantation in Chesterfield County, Virginia about 1730. Henry Cary Jr.’s sister, Anne Cary, my 7th great grandmother, was married to Maurice Langhorne,whose mother, Anne Cary’smother-in-law, was none other than Rebecca Carter, our eighth great grandmother, and a member of the same Carter family of Colonial Virginia.  Even closer perhaps, Colonel Archibald Cary of Ampthill in Chesterfield County, married Mary Randolph, 1722-1781.  She belongs to this very same famous Randolph family
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If all of these intermarriages make you dizzy, I surely understand. However, as you get to know the individuals and the immense contributions they made to the founding of America, I imagine you will admire them as I do. There is a book written by Robert K. Headley, Jr. titled Married Well and Often, Marriages of the Northern Neck of Virginia, 1649-1800. While it is a book of valuable marriage records, the title always makes me smile especially when I read of the many inter-family marriages that were common in the colonial days of Virginia.  
 
I do love family history!  Until next time, I am wishing you the very best,  Helen Holshouser 

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